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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

TOWN 
OF 

CHELMSFORD 



Annual Report 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1995 




IN MEMORIAM 



1995 

RUTH DELANEY 

Assessor 

Housing Authority 

Town Meeting Represenative 



FREDERICK BURNE 

Planning Board 



CARL A. OLSSON 

School Committee 




. 



vio^ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 

Location 

County 

Land Area 

Population 1995 

Assessed Valuation Rate for 1995 

Tax Rate 

United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District .... 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Board of Health 

Building Department 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans' Agent 



May. 1655 
Town Meeting 



Coil 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 

on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles 

from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 

from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

32,107 

$1,897,997,000 (Real Estate) 

$47,691 ,458 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $19.27 

($19.04 Residential - $20.23 Commercial) 

Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Thursday 1:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 
Thursday - Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1 :00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1 :00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 1 :00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

'[Except June, July & August] 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



MEETINGS 

First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
Third Monday in October 
7:00 p.m. - Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m. - Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. - 2nd & 4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m. - 1st & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m. - 1st Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 
McCarthy Middle Sch. 
McCarthy Middle Sch. 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 

Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

Accounting 250-5215 

Assessor 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

Cemetery 250-5245 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5267 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Planning Board 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

School Administration 251-5100 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 251-0123 

Water Department 256-2381 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1 : Town Offices Gym 

Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 

Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 

Precinct 4: Westlands School 

Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6: Westlands School 

Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 

Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 

Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1-202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 
Boston, MA 02116 
362 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Martin T. Meehan 

1 429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, DC 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 1 67 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2692 

Home: 4 Arbutus Avenue 

Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 
Room 4136 State House 
Boston, MA 02133 
617-722-1572 

Middlesex County Commission 

Superior Courthouse 

East Cambridge, MA 02141 

617-494-4100 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
ELECTED OFFICIALS 

CEMETERY COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Jean R. McCaffrey, CHMN 
1996 James F. Dolan 

1998 Gerald L. Hardy 

CONSTABLE - 3 Yr Term 
1998 William E. Spence 

BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Peter Dulchinos, CHMN 

1997 Paul E. McCarthy, VCHMN 

1998 Paul J. Canniff, CLK 

HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 Yr Term 

1997 Lynn M. Marcella, CHMN 

1998 Robert L. Hughes, VCHRM 

1996 William P. Keohane, TREAS 
1998 Pamela Turnbull 

(Governor Appointed) 
2000 Mary E. (Lisa) Royce 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Nancy Knight, CHRM 

1997 Jaclyn Dolan Matzin, VCHRM 
1996 Elizabeth A. McCarthy, TREAS 
1996 D. Lorraine Lambert 

1996 Lynda Reid Warren 

1998 John W. Cutter, Jr. 
1998 Sarah L. Warner 

MODERATOR - 3 Yr Term 
1996 Dennis E. McHugh 



PLANNING BOARD - 3 Yr Term 

1998 James M. Creegan , CHRM 

1997 Kim J. MacKenzie, VCHRM 

1997 Tracey Wallace Cody, CLK 

1996 Eugene E. Gilet 

1996 Thomas E. Firth 

1997 James P. Good 

1998 Kevin D. Clark 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 Yr Term 
1998 Wendy C. Marcks, CHRM 
1996 Judith B. Mallette, VCHRM 

1996 Mary E. Frantz, CLK 

1997 Anthony V. Volpe 

1998 Angelo J. Taranto 

SELECTMEN - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Robert P. Joyce, CHRM 
1998 Peter V. Lawlor, VCHRM 

1997 William F. Dalton, CLK 

1997 Thomas J. Welch* 

*Roger Blomgrem resigned 7/28/95 

1998 Susan J. Gates 

SEWER COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 
1998 John P. Emerson, Jr., CHRM 
1998 Barry B. Balan, VCHRM 
1997 George Abely, CLK 
1996 Richard J. Day 
1996 Thomas E. Moran 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Jean D. Sullivan 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips 

Bruce Symms 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. (Ret.) 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 

TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

DPW DIRECTOR 

James E. Pearson 

FIRE CHIEF 

John E. Parow 

POLICE CHIEF 

Armand J. Caron 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

John Morrison, CHMN 

Harold Matzkin, VCHMN 

Marcia Dobroth 

Dwight Hayward 

Beverly Koltookian 

Charles Piper 

Barbara Skaar 

Michael McCall - resigned 6/95 



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14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




XSfflS^K 



(Front Row 1-r) Peter V. Lawlor, Vice Chairman; 
Robert P. Joyce, Chairman; Susan J. Gates 

(Back Row 1-r) Thomas J. Welch; William F. Dalton, 
Clerk 



15 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

At the April 4th Town Election Selectmen Peter 
V. Lawlor was re-elected for a second term and Susan J. 
Gates was elected to fill the seat vacated by Jeffrey 
Brem, who did not seek re-election. The Board 
re-organized for the year on April 6th, with Robert P. 
Joyce as Chairman, Selectman Lawlor as Vice 
Chairman and William F. Dalton as Clerk. Ms. Gates 
took the fourth chair and Roger A. Blomgren the fifth. 

At the end of July Selectman Blomgren 
unexpectedly resigned from the Board to take a job in 
Illinois. Board members will miss the knowledge and 
experience that he contributed during his years as a 
Selectmen. 

The Board voted to call a Special Election in 
October to fill Mr. Blomgren's seat and Thomas J. 
Welch was elected on October 17, 1995. At the same 
election voters overwhelmingly turned down a $6.7 
million dollar exemption for the expansion of the 
Adams Library. 

Discussions were held at many meetings with 
the Ambulance Study Committee and the Fire Chief and 
in June the Board voted to accept the recommendation 
that the Town stay with a private ambulance service at 
this time. 

Also in June the Board voted not to extend town 
Counsel James Harrington's contract and went out with 
Requests for Proposals. The Boston firm of Kopelman 
and Paige was appointed interim Town Counsel. After 
interviews with many applicants on September 7, 1996 



16 



the Board voted to appoint Kopelman and Paige as the 
new Town Counsel for Chelmsford. 

The Board voted to take the Apple Country Club 
by eminent domain for use as a Town golf course and 
recreational facility and at the October Town Meeting 
members voted to buy the property outright with the use 
of Free Cash. 

The Board negotiated and signed two very 
noteworthy contracts during 1995. Town Manager 
Bernard Lynch was offered and accepted a three year 
contract, based on his excellent performance ratings. 
The Board also signed a ten year contract with 
Continental Cablevision which should prove very 
beneficial to the Town. 

September saw the revocation of two All 
Alcoholic Common Victualer licenses by the Board for 
the first time in decades - The Princeton who violated 
several zoning by-laws and the Meadow Lounge for 
non-payment of taxes. Both establishments were sold at 
auction and will have new owners by the first of the 
year. 

In November the Board heard the report of the 
Tax Classification Committee recommending a gradual 
elimination of tax classification for businesses. 
Selectmen voted to start the process by going from 
105% to 104% this year. 

Individual Selectmen served as liaisons between 
the Board of Selectmen and various Town and regional 
boards and commissions during the year. The Board of 
Selectmen also actively participated in the 



17 



Massachusetts' Selectmen's Association, the Northern 
Middlesex County of Governments, the Middlesex 
County Advisory Board and the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative 
decisions have a great impact on Town affairs, the 
Board of Selectmen has maintained regular contact with 
Congressman Marty Meehan's office as well as with 
Senator Lucile Hicks and State Representative Carol 
Cleven. The Selectmen wish to express their gratitude 
to Congressman Meehan, Senator Hicks and 
Representative Cleven for their help and cooperation 
during the past year. 

The Selectmen wish to take this opportunity to 
express their sincere gratitude to the various Town 
boards and commissions for their accomplishments 
during the past year. It should be remembered that 
these boards and committees are composed of unpaid 
volunteers who take many long hours out of their free 
time to work on issues and projects that benefit the 
Town of Chelmsford. In closing, the Board would also 
like to thank the Town Manager and the competent 
office staff of Judy Carter, Marian Currier, Diane 
Darling, Jeanne Parziale and Geoff Buswick, our intern 
for their support and cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Robert P. Joyce, Chairman 
Peter V. Lawlor, Vice Chairman 
William F. Dalton, Clerk 
Susan J. Gates 
Thomas J. Welch 



18 



TOWN MANAGER 

The year that ended on December 31, 1995 was a 
positive year for the Town of Chelmsford as we 
continued to experience favorable economic and fiscal 
conditions. We also moved forward in several areas to 
position ourselves for a bright future. 

The fiscal highlight of the year was the $2.1 
million surplus at the end of FY94. This surplus 
occurred as a result of increased tax collections, greater 
than anticipated motor vehicle taxes, and various 
departmental savings. The surplus reflects the economic 
and managerial health of the Town and its government. 
The surplus was used to reduce property taxes, pay for 
one time collective bargaining buy-backs, avoid bonding 
the acquisition of the Apple Country Club, and add to 
the Town's financial reserves. The majority of these 
actions will benefit the Town over the long term and will 
enhance our financial stability. The one short term 
benefit is tax relief, resulting from solid waste savings. 

In the Spring of 1995 the Town acted to purchase 
the Apple Country Club through eminent domain. The 
cost of this endeavor was approximately $1,042 million 
including facility equipment. This action prevented any 
development of this site which would have generated a 
negative cash flow to the Town as service costs such as 
education, solid waste, and infrastructure maintenance 
would have exceeded potential tax revenues. Instead, 
the Town preserved open space and a recreational asset 
which should generate revenues that will ultimately pay 



19 



for the golf course and then provide needed funding for 
future recreational programs. Plans for the course 
include golf as well as a variety of winter activities. 

In the late Summer of 1995 a new contract was 
settled with Colony/Continental Cable for another ten 
years of cable service. The contract included provision 
for a system upgrade, a $300,000 equipment grant for 
our local cable channel, annual funding for local public, 
educational and governmental programming, additional 
local cable channels, and the installation of an 
Institutional Network which will link all municipal 
facilities for the transmission of data, audio and voice. 
Along with future enhancements to the residential and 
commercial cable connections the Town is poised to 
utilize the growing information technology of the 
Internet. 

Economic expansion continued during 1995 with 
businesses leading or expanding in Chelmsford. These 
businesses provide employment opportunities, tax 
revenue, and assist in providing residential tax relief as 
business values rise and replace the burden currently 
carried by Chelmsford homeowners. This year's 
economic development successes include Cisco Systems, 
Kronos, Brooks Automation, Whistler, Catalog Ventures 
and Continental Cablevision. 

In the Fall of 1995 voters rejected a Proposition 
2 1/2 exemption for the Library Project. Such a vote 
would have increased property taxes for the life of the 
project indebtedness. The Library facility continues to 
require attention to its accessibility, its parking and its 
space needs. In response I have advised the Library 



20 



Trustees to reduce the scope of the Library project and 
live within the existing means of the Town. To this end 
we expect to bring a scaled down version of the project 
forward in the future. This project will not require 
additional revenues and will meet our immediate and 
mid-term needs while allowing for future expansion as 
deemed necessary. 

The emphasis of Chelmsford Town Government 
during the early 1990's was maximization of services 
during a period of contracted revenues, and a restoration 
of financial stability. While an eye was kept on longer 
term needs and impacts the focus was clearly immediate. 
The Town's efforts were successful and in 1995 the 
Town found itself well poised to move forward and 
address an array of needs. In this regard our focus has 
shifted beyond the immediate to the future. Several 
1995 efforts illustrate this change in focus. The Fall 
Town Meeting of 1995 appropriated $50,000 to fund an 
update of the Town Mater Plan. This plan, which is 
typically updated every ten years, will consider an array 
of issues that will determine the type of community that 
Chelmsford will be in the year 2006 and beyond. These 
issues include land use patterns, economic development, 
traffic, public facilities, open space and recreation, 
demographics and utilities. When completed it will 
serve as a basis for future operational planning issues 
related to the provision of governmental services. The 
plan is scheduled to be completed in mid 1996. 

In 1994 I submitted to the Board of Selectmen a 
Five Year Plan which elaborated upon the five year 
fiscal forecast which is required under the Chelmsford 
Home Rule Charter. Upon its completion I conducted a 



21 



community dialogue to elicit public input on the 
direction of the Town. This input along with the 
improved fiscal condition of the Town have allowed for 
an update and expansion of this five year blueprint. 
The plan that was prepared at the end of 1995 for 
submission to the Board of Selectmen is more ambitious 
and robust; and continues the focus of moving the Town 
forward. While ambitious it is also realistic in its 
projections and expectations. Highlights of the plan 
include: expanded and improved library facility and 
police station, investment in parks and recreation 
facilities, enhanced capital investment in buildings, 
infrastructure and equipment, increased financial 
reserves and projected tax relief. This Five Year Plan 
does or can work hand in hand with annual and five year 
capital budgets, annual operational budgets, and the soon 
to be completed Master Plan. 

Over the last several years we have made 
important strides in professionalizing our local 
government through the selection of department 
managers and the institutions of various management 
practices. These steps have produced efficiency and 
improved effectiveness. However, the quality of life 
within in the Town is also dependent upon volunteerism 
and community commitment. Two examples from 1995 
reflect the importance of these efforts and they reflect the 
type of community that Chelmsford has been and 
continues to be as it moves to a new stage of 
development. In the Winter of 1995 the Town 
experienced the first annual WinterFest. Coordinated 
and produced almost entirely by volunteer groups this 
event brought the community together in a variety of 
activities and events. In the Fall of 1995 the long 



22 



awaited Friendship Park was built and opened to the 
excitement of youngsters throughout the Town. This 
project was coordinated and funded almost entirely 
through donations of money and time. Both of these 
projects attest to the commitment that residents have to 
the cohimunity. These types of efforts should be 
encouraged and promoted for the benefit of all. 

As I look to 1996 I expect further improvements 
in our Town finances and services. Major projects for 
the year will include plans for addressing traffic 
congestion in Central Square, an affordable 
improvement to the Adams Library, and greater 
utilization of information technology. I encourage the 
residents to provide me feedback on all of these efforts 
now or as more information becomes available. 

I want to thank the members of the Board of 
Selectmen for their direction and support during 1995 
including Roger Blomgren, Jeff Brem, Bill Dalton, 
Susan Gates, Bob Joyce, Peter Lawlor, and Tom Welch. 
I also want to thank the employees and Department 
Managers of the Town for their hard work and 
dedication. In particular I want to recognize the staff of 
the Executive Office including Judy Carter, Marian 
Currier, Diane Darling, Jeanne Parziale and Geoff 
Buswick who assisted me this year as an assistant and 
public management intern. 



23 



Finally and most importantly, I want to thank the 
residents for the opportunity to serve you as your Town 
Manager. I look forward to working with and for you in 
1996 and beyond to make Chelmsford an even better 
community. 

Sincerely, 



Bernard F. Lynch 
Town Manager 




24 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 





Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Assistant Town Clerk 






Janet M. Hart 
Senior Clerk 






Katherine M. Kalicki 
Part-Time Clerk 




Licenses: 

Sporting 

Dog 

Kennel 


1,004 

2,954 

9 




Birth In<? t 

416 


Deaths 
284 


Marriages 

206 


Intentions 
208 







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26 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Board of Health Members: 

Peter Dulchinos. Chairman 

Paul F. McCarthy, Vice-Chairman 

Dr. Paul J. Canniff, Clerk 

Health Department Personnel: 

Richard J. Day, Director of Public Health 
John P. Emerson, Asst. Director/Health Inspector 
Diana L. Wright, Departmental Assistant 
Judith Dunigan, R.N., Town Nurse 
Eric P. Kaplan, M.D., Town Physician 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1995 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement 
Program continued its effort to clean up our waterways. 
The Board of Health, with the advent of a central sewer 
system in the Town Chelmsford, is now embarking on 
certain enforcement activities to insure compliance with 
local By-Laws which will insure a safe water supply. 
Dye testing, water sampling and issuance of septic 
system permits will continue in all the non-sewered 
areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed 



below: 



Percolation Tests - 13 $ 650 

Deep Tests - 60 3,000 

Sewage Repair Permits - 53 1 ,325 



27 



Sewage Construction Permits - 26 1,300 

Miscellaneous Licenses & Fees 18.392 

TOTAL $24,667 

During 1995 five inspections were made at 
existing day care centers; two-hundred thirteen 
inspections were made for Chapter II Housing; eight 
school inspections; six-hundred twenty-three 
complaints received and checked; Camp Paul 
inspections; thirty bathing beaches inspections; five 
International Certificates of Vaccination, restaurants 
and retail food store inspections, one-hundred thirty 
establishments in town inspected twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater Program 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was 
reappointed by the Board of Selectmen as the Town's 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal 
Coordinator to enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for this 
Town. 

The Board of Health held two Household 
Hazardous Waste Collection Days this year which were 
held on April 22, 1995 and October 14, 1995. We 
properly disposed of the following quantities of 
materials: 

1. 66 barrels of Hazardous Materials 

2. 800+ Gallons of Automotive Waste Oil 

3. 150 Car Batteries 



28 



New Protocols for the Protection of the Public Health 

"Rabies" - 1995 was another productive year for 
the Board of Health. During this time frame the Board 
of Health continued its program to control the spread of 
Rabies. We held another rabies clinic to vaccine the 
unprotected cat and dog population in Town. Dr. 
Gruber and Dr. Holub ran our clinic. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were 
completed during 1995 for the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health: 



Campylobacter Enteritis 


12 


Cryptosporidiosis 


1 


E-Coli 


1 


Giardiasis 


1 


Hepatitis A 


1 


Hepatitis B 


7 


Hepatitis C 


1 


Kawasaki Syndrome 


1 


Legionella Disease 


1 


Lyme Disease 


2 


Pertusssis 


8 


Salmonella 


9 


Shigella 


1 


Tuberculosis - Active 


2 


Tuberculosis Control Pgm* 


25 


Yersinia 


2 



* Referrals received from Lowell Chest 
Clinic and Middlesex Community Hospital 
TB Clinic. 



29 



The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require 
certification of freedom from that disease is another 
responsibility of the Town Nurse. Two-hundred six 
Mantoux (TB) tests were given to persons as required 
for pre-employment and college and also to household 
contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 
Home visits and telephone calls are made to families of 
active and some inactive tuberculosis cases on a 
periodic basis to insure understanding of the illness and 
that adequate medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous 
medical records are kept and updated on residents who 
have a positive (TB) Mantoux test and are receiving 
medication prophylactically and being followed 
radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic and Middlesex 
TB Clinic. When necessary, TB testing is done at 
places of business if employees are exposed to an active 
case of TB. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics 
this year. One-hundred thirty-nine persons were 
immunized with pneumonia vaccine and one-thousand 
one-hundred twenty-five persons were immunized with 
flu vaccine at clinics. Additional doses were given to 
nursing homes, Adult Retarded Citizens, employees, ten 
home visits were made to handicapped or house-bound 
residents and fifty-five doses to McFarlin Manor and 
Chelmsford Arms residents. A total of one-thousand 
eight-hundred ninety-two doses of flu vaccine were 
administered in Town. 



30 



Two hundred forty-two immunizations were 
administered to adults and students in compliance with 
the Massachusetts Immunizations Laws and 
prophylactically to residents traveling to 
underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held 
the first Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at 
the Board of Health, Town Offices, six-hundred 
forty-two residents attended the screenings. 

Mammography Screening 

A mobile mammography screening was held 
and twelve residents attended. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Board of Health offers lead paint testing for 
children between the ages nine months and six years. 
Residents may call the Board of Health at 250-5243 and 
make an appointment with the nurse. Twenty-four 
children were screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Board of Health 
include cholesterol. Dates of these programs will be 
advertised in advance. 

World AIDS Day Event 

Each year around World AIDS Day, December 
1st, an event is held in Chelmsford to promote 
education and generate discussion among family 



31 



members with regards to HIV/AIDS. It is the 
committee's hope to encourage compassion, 
understanding and support for those infected and 
affected by HIV/AIDS. The committee for World 
AIDS Day in Chelmsford is in need of volunteers. If 
interested, call Judy Dunigan, RN, Board of Health, 
250-5243. 

A Health Fair will be held in conjunction with 
Westford every other year, finances permitting. The 
Health Fair is in Chelmsford, Saturday, March 30, 1996 
from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All Chelmsford residents 
eighteen years and older are welcome. It will be held at 
the Senior Center, Groton Road, N. Chelsmford. 



32 



CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control 
Project (CMMCP) currently provides its services to 28 
cities and towns throughout Middlesex and Worcester 
Counties. The town of Dracut became a member of the 
CMMCP as of July 1, 1995. We welcome them and 
look forward to providing our services. 

The project's headquarters is located at 1 1 1 Otis 
Street, Northboro, MA. Tours of the headquarters or 
visits to field work sites may be arranged by calling the 
office in advance. 

The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito 
Management (IMM), blending state of the art methods 
and techniques with expertise, experience, and scientific 
research to provide our member communities with 
modern, environmentally sound, cost effective mosquito 
control. 

During 1995 the project conducted four hundred 
and fifty eight (458) adult mosquito spraying operations 
in residential and recreational areas, and four hundred 
and twenty seven (427) larviciding operations. Eight 
thousand nine hundred and thirty two (8,392) catch 
basins were treated with larvicidal briquettes to control 
the mosquitoes that seek out these cool dark wet areas to 
breed. One thousand four hundred and forty nine (1,449) 
culverts were cleaned in an attempt to eliminate 
unnecessary standing water. This work was done in 
conjunction with cleaning, clearing, and digging of 
ninety six thousand nine hundred and thirty seven 
(96,937) feet of streams, brooks, and ditches. This 



33 



represents over eighteen miles of waterways which were 
cleaned and improved. 

Eight ponds were cleaned and redug during 1995 
to make them once again suitable for native fish, frogs, 
and other wetlands wildlife and vegetation. Our pond 
clearing projects have been extremely successful at 
reducing the mosquito breeding in these areas, while at 
the same time restoring the pond's value for fire fighting, 
agriculture, recreation, and/or aesthetics. 

The Mosquito Awareness program which we 
offer to elementary schools in our district has become 
very popular. Project staff meet with students and 
teachers to discuss mosquito biology, mosquito habitat, 
and control procedures. Much of the presentation is 
directed towards what the children and their families can 
do to prevent mosquitoes from breeding around their 
homes. Live samples of mosquito larvae are included 
with the presentation, and are left in the classrooms so 
that students can watch them develop. Slides, videos, 
handouts and coloring books help to make this an 
interesting program. 

As part of our effort to reduce the need for 
pesticides we continue to expand our water management 
program. By cleaning clogged and overgrown 
waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands 
are restored, and water quality is improved. Last winter 
we acquired and refurbished a wood chipper to be used 
by our water management division. A new dump truck 
and utility trailer were purchased this fall to replace our 
1 975 truck and trailer. 



34 



Bti mosquito larvicide is used to treat areas 
where mosquito larvae are found. We routinely check 
known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to 
notify us of any areas they suspect could breed 
mosquitoes. Our field crews will investigate all such 
sites and treat if needed. 

Our goal is to handle all mosquito problems with 
water management or larviciding but we recognize that 
there are times when adult mosquito spraying is the only 
viable solution. In such cases residential and 
recreational areas are treated with either handheld or 
pick-up truck mounted sprayers. 

The project's surveillance program monitors adult 
mosquito and larval population density and is the 
backbone for prescribing various control techniques. 
Rain gauges are set out and data collected by our 
surveillance crews in an effort to predict when mosquito 
breeding will occur. 

The project's video "Working for You" is 
available to anyone interested in learning about mosquito 
control and the services provided by the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 

We would like to thank you for the support you 
have rendered during 1995 and we look forward to 
helping you and your community with its mosquito 
problems in the future. 



35 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

Department Members: 

James E. Pearson, P.E., Director & Town Engineer 
George LeMasurier, Assistant Town Engineer 
Gail Loiselle, Principal Clerk 

The work of the Engineering Division can best 
be summarized by listing the engineering assistance 
given to other Town boards and departments. This 
year's projects included: 

PLANNING BOARD: 

- Reviewed seven (7) subdivisions and five (5) site 
plans 

- Inspected new construction on sixteen (16) streets 

- Prepared cost estimates for bonding new roadway 
construction and prepared bond reductions 

- Attended all regular meetings 

- Served on parking subcommittee 

- Prepared proposed amendments to the Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations which were adopted by the 
Board 

ASSESSORS: 

- Regularly updated Assessor maps 

- Calculated lot areas 

- Assisted in property line determinations 



36 



TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE: 

- Inspected streets & reviewed plans & legal 
descriptions for street acceptances of Peders Place, 
Omni Way and Scotty Hollow Drive 

- Inspected streets & prepared plans & legal 
descriptions for street acceptances of Adirondack 
Road, Boyd's Lane, Carter Drive, Burton Lane 

- Prepared maps for town meeting articles 

- Provided survey, layout, plan, and application for 
state curbcut at Vinal Square municipal parking lot 

- Inspected & responded to pole location requests from 
utility companies. 

- Prepared street light specifications 

- Prepared descriptions for renaming of Old Stage 
Road, Pendleton Road, Farley Brook, & Park Place 

- Provided research, survey & proposed easement plan 
at corner of Weide and Middlesex Street 

- Calculated perimeter of Apple Country Club 

- Inspected & responded to drainage, tree, and other 
miscellaneous complaints. 

HIGHWAY DIVISION: 

- Inspected and prepared cost estimates for the 
resurfacing of thirteen (13) streets 

- Provided grades and drainage analysis for fifteen (15) 
drainage projects 

- Provided layout & grades for Roberts Field 
playground and walkway 

- Provided layout of stop lines at major intersections 

- Inspected & responded to drainage and roadway 
complaints 

- Provided parking space layout at Roberts Field 

- Staked new curb cut for Vinal Square municipal 
parking lot construction 

- Assisted with the snow and ice effort 



37 



The sidewalk improvement project this year 
consisted of the construction of sidewalks on Old 
Westford Road, Pilgrim Road, and Steadman Street 
where layout, inspections, grading, drainage analysis, 
and curb elevations were provided by the Engineering 
Division. Project Engineer Jim Stanford has been busy 
designing the sidewalk improvements, preparing the 
easement documents, bid documents and overseeing 
construction. 

Payrolls, expense vouchers and budgeting for all 
divisions except Highway are performed in this office. 



38 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Department Members: 

John Long, Superintendent of Streets 
Lawrence Ferreira, Foreman 
Marie Burns, Principal Clerk 

Drivers Operators 

Todd Chase Gary Beaulieu 

David Irvine Audie Boudreau 

David Eacrett Joseph Eriksen 

David Palmer Dennis Greenwood 

Paul Winegar Raymond Maybury 

Mechanics Laborer 

John Ferreira, Lead Mech. Kenneth Burroughs 
Richard Jensen 

The Highway Division maintains and improves 
all the streets, culverts, catch basins and manholes, 
street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for 
approximately 200 miles of roadway. Additionally, the 
Highway Division clears the streets and public lots of 
snow and ice, and assists other departments with the 
division's equipment and expertise of the crew. The 
office maintains all financial records needed for the 
reporting, tracking and payment of all vouchers 
connected with the highway budgets - including, 
general expenses, salaries, snow & ice, road 
reconstruction or repair, streetlighting, and Capital 
expenditures. 



39 



Streets re-surfaced this year include: 

Amble Road Hitchinpost Road 

Burning Tree Lane Locke Road 

Canter Road Mill Road 

Country Club Drive Proctor Road 

Crooked Spring Road Rack Road 

De Wolf Drive Swain Road 

Draycoach Road Turtle Road 

Footpath Road Twiss Road 

Graniteville Road Wilson Lane 

All drains on the re-surfaced streets were 
reconstructed prior to the resurfacing. In addition, 
drains in the Westlands Area were reconstructed prior to 
the pavement overlay by the Sewer Commission. 

Handicapped ramps were installed at the Adams 
Library. Two handicapped parking places were 
installed at the beach area on Freeman Lake. The 
parking lot at Roberts Field was enlarged and paved and 
a handicapped ramp leading to the new playground area 
was constructed. 

During the winter, the Town received 
approximately sixty (60) inches of snow from 9 (nine) 
snowstorms, which were handled by the dedicated 
highway employees, assisted by sewer, parks and 
engineering personnel, and hired contractors. For many 
of the storms, this meant working for extended periods 
without sleep in order to maintain safe road conditions. 
The mechanics kept the equipment in proper operating 
condition, with few extended mechanical failures. 



40 



PARKS DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Edward Jamros, Groundskeeper 
Randy Boisvert, Part Time Laborer 

The Parks Division maintains all the parks, 
traffic islands, ballfields, playgrounds, and commons 
under the control of the Town. The grounds are 
groomed each Spring and prepared for the heavy use 
each area is subjected to during the year. The Division 
employees perform an exceptional job each year 
preparing the Town Common area for the annual July 
4th celebration. Equally important is the job of 
restoring the damaged areas resulting from the 
activities. 

Special projects this year included the 
construction and installation of benches at the East 
Playground, new fencing and a new playground at 
Roberts Field, and reconstruction of the basketball 
equipment at the South Row School. This Division 
worked with the Sewer Division in connecting the 
Westlands School to the Town sewer system. The 
Parks Division also follows up on all tree complaints; 
determining ownership, pruning, chipping and the 
hiring of a private tree company for the cutting down 
and removal of problem trees. 

Special recognition goes to Dick Codling, Red 
Wagon Landscaping, Dick Burkinshaw, Chelmsford 
Rotary, Chelmsford Garden Club, and Stott 
Landscaping for their continued participation in the 
"Adopt-a-Park" program. 



41 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Theodore Godfroy, Superintendent 
Gerald Johnson, Custodian 
David Grimshaw, Custodian 

This Division maintains all Public Buildings in 
the Town. Regular custodial duties, the updating of 
buildings to meet the ever-changing codes, and removal 
of snow during the winter months keep the staff very 
busy. 

This year's special projects at the Town Offices 
included: 

- The railing on the shipping dock was reconstructed 

- Electrical lines and outlets were added to all offices to 
comply with safety codes 

- An automatic door opener was installed at the 
handicap entrance to the elevator 

- Retrofit door levers were added to all doors to comply 
with ADA regulations 

- The walls of nine offices were painted 

- Light fixtures were replaced with energy-saver units 

and at the Old Town Hall: 

- Lights were converted to energy savers by 
Massachusetts Electric 

- The oil burner was converted to gas 

- A new chairlift was installed 

- The outside walls were insulated by Colonial Gas Co. 
as part of an energy savings program 

- The exterior was painted by Homer Construction 



42 



Utilizing the Senior Citizen Program 
administered by Marty Walsh of the Senior Center, the 
banisters and railings at the Town Offices were painted. 
Interior painting of common areas at the Old Town Hall 
was also completed. 



43 



SEWER DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Joseph Witts, Operations Supervisor 
James Casparro, Inspector 
John Kobelenz, Safety Plumbing Inspector 
Eric Newman, Maintenance Mechanic 
Evelyn Newman, Department Assistant 
Jacqueline Sheehy, Principal Clerk 
Michael Vosnakis, Maintenance Mechanic 

The Sewer Division continued to expand again 
this year with the addition of four (4) new pump 
stations located at Miland Avenue, Clinton Avenue, 
Fair Street and Brian Road. This brings the total 
number of pump stations to seventeen (17). On-line 
sewer users have increased by 660 over the past year for 
a total of 4, 160. 

With new sewer construction continuing to 
expand into additional areas of the Town the office staff 
keeps extremely busy preparing and processing the 
sewer betterment assessments, sewer user bills, safety 
plumbing permits, construction permits, the Sewer 
Commission agendas, meeting minutes, contracts, and 
general correspondence. 

With the addition of the new pump stations, 
personnel changes and additions have been made to 
keep up with the increased work load. Joe Witts was 
named Operations Supervision This position has the 
overall responsibility for the proper operation of the 
sewer system. Eric Newman was added as a full time 
maintenance mechanic. Eric brings a background in 



44 



electronics to assist us with the automated facets of our 
system. 

Thanks go to the three Water Districts, for their 
cooperation and assistance during the past year. Thanks 
also to the Fire and Police Departments for monitoring 
the pumping stations alarm system. Special thanks go 
to the Sewer Commission for their cooperation 
throughout the year. 

I would like to thank the entire staff for their 
cooperation, help, and flexibility. It was greatly 
appreciated. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Director of Public Works 



45 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Jean R. McCaffery, Chairman 
James F. Dolan 
Gerald L. Hardy 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report 
to the citizens of Chelmsford some major 
accomplishments and highlights of 1995. The 
Cemetery Department completed a number of 
improvements and beautification projects throughout 
the year including the following: 

At Fairview Cemetery, the Department staff 
constructed and painted two pairs of wooden entrance 
gates to replace the existing gates which had seriously 
deteriorated due to weather. The third pair of gates is 
scheduled to be replaced in 1996. 

At Pine Ridge Cemetery, the exterior of the 
garage and office building was completely repainted. In 
Section F, Pine Ridge, the staff took advantage of 
extremely dry summer weather and rehabilitated over 
600 linear feet of flagstone walkways at a minimal cost. 
This project has greatly enhanced the appearance of the 
area surrounding the Pine Ridge monument and has 
resulted in many compliments from lot owners and 
visitors. 

The Commission wishes to express its 
appreciation to the Middlesex County Sheriffs 
Department for their assistance in painting the fencing 
at Pine Ridge through their Community Work Program. 
During the early fall, inmates involved in the work 
release program scraped and painted over 800 linear 



46 



feet of iron fencing. This successful program resulted 
in a savings of over seven thousand dollars to the 
Department. 

At Forefathers Burying Ground, the 
Commission completed a project to replace damaged or 
missing Veteran's flag holders. A total of seventy flag 
holders were replaced including 34 Revolutionary War 
and 33 Civil War veterans. Last September, 
approximately 400 daffodil bulbs were planted in 
Forefathers Burying Ground in concert with the 
Chelmsford Garden Club's "Daffodils for Chelmsford" 
project. 

The Commission wishes to acknowledge Mr. 
Harry Mohla, Horticulture Dept. Head, Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School, and his students for doing an 
outstanding job planting the bulbs. Special thanks to 
Margaret Dunn for her assistance in coordinating the 
daffodil project and for volunteering to assist with the 
flag holder restoration project. 

During the year there were 140 interments. 
Cremation interments totaled 27 and accounted for 19% 
of total interments. There were 69 lots sold in 1995. 
The Cemetery Commission commends the department 
staff for their hard work and for continuing to provide 
the Town with professional service at one to the most 
delicate times of need. 



47 



Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa, Jr., Superintendent 

Jorge Caires, Working Foreman 

Kenneth Frazier, Backhoe Operator 

Patrick Caires, Truck Driver 

Eileen Johnson, P.T. Clerk 

Jose Teixeria, Seasonal Landscaper 
Claudio Caires, Seasonal Landscaper 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Jean R. McCaffery 
Chairman 



48 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Department Members: 

Jean Sullivan, Town Accountant 
Renee Young, Assistant Town Accountant 
Patricia Tucker, Principal Clerk 
Christine Dowd, Payroll Coordinator 

Fiscal Year 1995 was the first full year the 
Accounting Department utilized the Munis computer 
system. This enabled the Accounting Department to 
issue timely and up-to-date financial information to 
Department Heads, Division Directors, Town Manager, 
Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen. 

Along with the new computer system, the paper 
flow in the Accounting Department was organized to 
better retrieve and make accessible all accounting 
records for audit purposes. 

During fiscal year 1996 the Accounting 
Department will be working with the School Department 
in converting the school to Munis. This will necessitate 
a changeover in program language in the Accounting 
Department from Cobol to 4GL. This will be completed 
by fiscal year end 1996. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jean Sullivan 
Town Accountant 



49 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Board Members: 

Diane M. Phillips, MAA, Chief Assessor 
Bruce A. Symmes, CMA, RMA, MAA 

Eric R. Josephson, MAA, Assistant Assessor 
Nancy L. Maher, Administrative Assistant 
Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 
Elaine Myers, Principal Clerk 

This office was greatly saddened with the loss of 
Ruth K. Delaney who had been an Assessor from 1976 to 
1992. Ruthie was an exceptional lady who left her mark 
wherever she went. She was a friend and a mentor to all of 
us. Ruthie was also the last elected Assessor in 
Chelmsford. 

Assessor Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. retired this year, 
Mr. Shanahan had been with our office since 1992. The 
office staff wishes Joe a happy, healthy retirement. 

The year 1995 was a revaluation year. Although 
most of our values declined for this year, we are now 
starting to see a gradual increase in values, especially in the 
residential area. The commercial and industrial values have 
slowly started to stabilize, and our vacancy rate should 
show a marked improvement for 1996. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Board of Assessors 



50 



DATA PROCESSING 

During the year 1995, the Data Processing 
Department formed a Software Evaluation Team. This 
team evaluated two windows suites program that would 
be used Town-wide on all computers. After careful 
study the team choose Lotus SmartSuite to install onto 
the network for Town-wide use. Slowly individual 
departments are being upgraded to handle this new 
capacity of Windows and Suite work. 

Another project completed was the transfer of 
the Assessor's database to the IBM RS/6000 (UNIX) 
machine. This allowed the Assessor's Department to be 
more productive in their work, they are experiencing 
faster response time and not having to worry about disk 
space any longer. 

The Data Processing Department took on the 
task of printing the Sewer Department bills. This now 
frees up the Sewer Department's printer from an all day 
job to the Data Processing printer taking an hour for this 
same job. 

Ongoing upgrade and maintenance to the 
networks were administered throughout the year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Judy Dunn 

Data Processing Coordinator 



51 



TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 

Department Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, Finance Director & 

Treasurer/Collector 
Carol R. Lambert, Assistant Treasurer 
Bettie A. Osborne, Departmental Assistant 
Judith A. Olsson, Part-time, Legal Clerk 
Joan L. Garland, Data Processing Clerk 
Anna M. Griffin, Accts. Payable/Receivable Clerk 

Aided by an improved economy and conservative 
budgeting practices, the Town's financial position has 
improved significantly in fiscal year 1995. Property 
taxes provide the majority of revenues and current 
collections have increased in the fiscal year due to a 
continued aggressive collection procedure. In fiscal year 
1995, the percent of net tax levy collected was at a 
record of 98.2%. 

As of the end of fiscal year 1995, the General 
Fund balance increased $870,235. The General Fund 
budgetary revenue exceeded estimates by $557,388. 
This in itself is an indication of very positive economic 
activity in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town has made significant progress in 
building up reserves in fiscal 1995. Our strengthened 
financial position enables the Town to transfer $830,000 
in fiscal 1995, and $431,097 in fiscal 1996 into the 
Stabilization Fund for future capital projects. 



52 



The Town has improved its long-term financial 
position through the preparation and adherence to five 
year fiscal forecasts and strategic plan. This plan 
addresses operating costs, debt, facility needs, and 
financial reserves. 

Sincerely, 

Charles F. Mansfield 

Finance Director/Treasurer/Tax Collector 



53 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

This year has proven to be another busy year for 
the Chelmsford Fire Department. Emergency responses 
increased by 3.4% or 122 calls. Actual fire calls were 
up for the third year in a row, showing an increase of 
12% or 318 calls. Two areas of decreased activity were 
in false alarms and service calls. Fire Prevention issued 
over 2,000 permits in 1995, of which 987 were smoke 
detector inspection certificates. In addition, 1,920 open 
burning permits were issued. 

The Town of Chelmsford went on line, in June, 
with the Enhanced 911 (E-911) emergency calling 
system. This system has allowed for all residents of 
Chelmsford to utilize a three digit number for all public 
safety emergencies. Fire and Police dispatch were also 
consolidated this year in conjunction with E-911, 
relocating fire dispatch to the police station located at 
230 North Road. 

Improvements in the emergency medical 
capabilities of the department continued in 1995. 
Twenty (20) additional firefighters were trained to the 
Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) level bringing 
the total number of EMTS' to forty-four (44). 

The goals for the upcoming year are to complete 
the fire and police dispatch consolidation, increase our 
fire prevention effort, improve on firefighting and 
emergency medical in-house training and to institute the 
Student Awareness Fire Education (S.A.F.E.) program 
into the Chelmsford school system. The S.A.F.E. 
program is the fire safety version of the D.A.R.E. 



54 



program and will be taught by firefighters William 
Cady in Grades 1 and 2. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the 
Board of Selectmen and all other town departments, 
along with the members of the Chelmsford Fire 
Department and my office staff for their help and 
cooperation over the past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



John E. Parow 
Fire Chief 



55 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 

John E. Parow 

Deputy Chief 

James A. Sousa 

Captains 



James M. Spinney 
James P. Boermeester 



Walter F. Adley 
Martin Boermeester 
William V. Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
John Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
David Clancy 
Kevin Clarke 
Mark F. Conlin 
James F. Curran 
William Curran 
William Dalton 
John Depalma 
Michael Donoghue 
Bruce Donovan 
Donald A. Drew 
James J. Durkin 
Jesse Foster 
David Hadley 
William Hadley 
Paul D. Hayes 
Henry A. Houle 
William Jamer 
Peter Johnson 



W. Michael Burke 
Charles A. Schramm 
Michael F. Curran 

Firefighters 

Dennis Keohane 
William Keohane 
Raymond R. Kydd 
Cynthia Leczynski 
Emil Magiera 
Leo F. Manley 
Leo Martin 
Michael McTeague 
Leslie Merrill 
Richard Miller 
Edward J. Nolet 
Kevin O'Brien 
Donald E. Peterson 
Daniel T. Reid 
James F. Reid 
John E. Reid 
Michael Ridlon 
Arthur Rivard 
John Robinson 
Gary Ryan 
George E. Ryan 
Kevin M. Sheehy 
Joseph Spinazola 
Brian Stanton 
J. Daniel Ubele 
Dennis Vargeletis 

Department Assistant 

Martha A. DeSaulnier 

Senior Clerk 

Patricia A. Britton 

Mechanic 

James Keeley 



56 



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57 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information 
and review the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1995. 

At the present time, the Department is made up of 
53 permanent Officers. 

CHIEF OF POLICE I 

Armand J. Caron 

LIEUTENANTS 

Steven A. Burns James F. Murphy 

Raymond G. McCusker Francis X. Roark 

SERGEANTS 

Paul E. Cooper Timothy F. O'Connor 

J. Ronald Gamache E. Michael Rooney 

Francis P. Kelly John O. Walsh 

DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTOR 
LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

INSPECTORS 

James T. Finnegan Peter C. McGeown 

Jared S. Finnegan Brian F. Mullen 

CRIME PREVENTION OFFICER 

Gail F. Hunter 

D.A.R.E. OFFICER 

Todd D. Ahern 

JUVENILE OFFICER 

Kenneth R. Duane 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE OFFICER 

Daniel J. Ahern 



58 



Richard A. Adams 
Daniel J. Ahern 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 

Sgt. Scott R. Ubele 

Roland E. Linstad 
Paul E. Richardson 



COMMUNITY RESPONSE UNIT 

Jeffrey A. Blodgett Russell H. Linstad 

Colin C. Spence 

PATROL OFFICERS 



Jeffrey J. Bernier 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Patrick W. Daley 
Philip R. Dube, Jr. 
Francis J. Goode, Jr. 
Richard D. Hallion 
Martin W. Krikorian 
David F. MacKenzie, Jr. 
John C. McGeown 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
Edward F. Quinn 

Ernest R. 



John A. Roark 
John E. Redican 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Anthony Spinazola 
James M. Spinney, Jr. 
Edward F. Smith 
Michael M. Stott 
Francis P. Teehan 
David R. Tine 
Robert J. Trudel 
George A. Tyros 
William R. Walsh 
Woessner, Jr. 



FULL-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

William G. Amundson Timothy Goode 

Gloria Armstrong Frank C. Lane 

David DeFreitas Michael L. Taplin 

Richard Demers William Vaughn 
Federick F. Flynn, Jr. 

PART-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Sandra Langley Laura B. Raffaelo 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANT 

Mary Jane Grant 



59 



PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Marie K. DiRocco Donna Fox 

Lynne Tessier 

JUNIOR CLERK 

Margaret E. Greenhalgh 

MATRONS 

Donna Fox Laura B. Raffaelo 

Sandra Langley Carol Richardson 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 

1994 1995 

Photocopying Machines $ 

Firearms Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Firearms Identification Cards 

Court Fines Revenue 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 

Photographs 

Police Details - Service Charge 

False Alarm Fees 

Alarm Permit Fees 

Parking Fines 

Restitution 

Total Receipts Returned 

To The Town: $226,032.88 $322,801 .54 



3,352.00 


3,358.00 


3,780.00 


2,814.00 


1.50 


1.50 


442.00 


372.00 


27,092.00 


27,805.00 


136,749.00 


234,371.50 


720.00 


536.00 


28,003.38 


27,057.54 


1,300.00 


1,310.00 


8,525.00 


9,155.00 


14,795.00 


15,223.00 


1,273.00 


798.00 



60 



ARRESTS 

1994 1995 

Males Arrested 562 612 

Females Arrested 106 138 



Total Arrests 668 750 

BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 

1994 1995 

Adult Arrests 619 698 

Juvenile Arrests 49 46 

Whites Arrested 561 592 

Blacks Arrested 22 1 8 

Asians Arrested 1 5 20 

Unknowns Arrested 70 6 

Charges logged against those arrests 1,218 1,396 

CRIMES 

1994 1995 

Crimes Against Persons 1 49 154 

Crimes Against Property 186 141 

Crimes Against Public Order 883 878 



61 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 

1994 


1995 


Placed on Probation 




26 


32 


Suspended Sentence/Placed on File 




26 


21 


Placed on File 




11 


11 


Guilty Findings 






232 


Not Guilty Finding 




2 


6 


Continued without a Finding 






161 


Dismissed with Probable Cause 




30 


98 


Court Costs & Continued Without 
Finding 




34 


1 


Committed to Youth Services 
Board 




7 


5 


Committed to House of Correction, 
Billerica 




34 


21 



Cases Pending & Continued 

In Court 879 785 

Defaulted Appearances 151 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program 

(ASAP) 19 39 



62 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



Calls Answered by Cruisers 


22,012 


25,335 


Summons Served 


441 


566 


Licenses Suspended/Revoked 


1,184 


1,230 


Accidents Reports 


674 


565 


Fatal Accidents 


3 


1 


Personal Injury Accidents 


170 


159 


Mileage of Cruisers 


471,996 


568,350 


Station Lockups 


667 


750 


Citations Issued 


. 3,634 


6,201 


Parking Violations Issued 


530 


534 


Protective Custody 


92 


43 


Restraining Orders Served 


97 


104 



False Alarms Responded to 

by Cruisers 1,250 1,428 



TRAINING AND SCHOOLS ATTENDED 

1994 1995 

Patrol Officers Basic Police Acad. 7 5 

Infrared Breath Test Oper. Re-cert. 40 

Infrared Breath Test Re-cert. Instr. 1 1 

Identi-kit School 1 1 



63 



1994 1995 

Vehicle Accident Investigations 3 3 

Utilization of Technical Equipment in 

Police Investigations 2 

Training Instructor 1 1 

Occupant Protection Usage & Enforcement 

Training Instructor 9 

D.A.R.E. Training 1 

Due Process & Just Cause Employer/ 

Employee Rights 1 

Re-empowerment of Management 1 

Recreational Vehicle Laws 1 

Emergency Communications' Instructor 1 

Emergency Communications 2 

Emergency Medical Dispatch 1 

APCO Federal Dispatch Certification 10 

E-91 1 Statewide Emergency Tele. Course 10 

Oxygen Resuscitation 5 



64 



1994 1995 

Police Training on Clinic and Hospital Security 

and Access Issues 2 

Re-evaluating the Infrastruct. of Internal Affairs 1 

Commercial Motor Vehicle License Enforcement 4 

Commercial Motor Vehicle Stops 4 

Grant Writing for Policing 1 

Nat'l Assoc, of Bunco Invest. Seminar Prosecutors 

and Advocates Conference on Domest Viol 1 

Crime Watch Training Session 3 

Internal Affairs Investigation Seminar 1 

Dom. Violence Enforc. (Law,Practice,Theory) 3 

Armorers Course 1 

Impact of Recent Court Decisions on the Arrest and 

Prosecution of OUI Cases Seminar 2 

How Good Police Work Leads to Good Results 

In Court Seminar 2 



65 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Mission of the Chelmsford Police 
Department is to enhance the quality of life in the Town 
of Chelmsford by working cooperatively with the public 
and within the framework of the United States 
Constitution to enforce the laws, preserve the peace, 
reduce fear and provide a safe environment. 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

The Chelmsford Police Department has realized 
impressive achievements in the past 12 months and are 
listed as follows: 

1 . As a result of the Department's Community 
Policing Program and its Traffic Safety 
Program, Chelmsford is a safer place to live. 
The overall crime rate has dropped by 27% from 
the previous year, while our major crime 
clearance rate has increased to 34%. The Traffic 
Safety Program has accomplished a 66% 
reduction in fatal motor vehicle/pedestrian 
accidents and personal injury accidents have 
been reduced by 7%. The Town of Chelmsford 
has experienced an overall decrease in motor 
vehicle/pedestrian accidents of 16%. It is our 
belief that the crime and accident statistical 
decrease can be attributed to community 
education and an aggressive enforcement policy. 

2. The Chelmsford Police Department applied 
for and received the following Grants totaling 
$564,135.88 for 1995. 



66 



1. U.S. Department of Justice Crime 
Bill (COPS) Grant $450,000. 

2. U.S. Department of Justice 
Community Policing Grant (COPS 

' FAST) $75,000. 

3. D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse 
Resistance Education) Grant $17,678.73. 

4. Governor's Highway Safety 
Bureau Community Policing Grant 
$7,457.15. 

5. Governor's Highway Safety 
Bureau Selective Enforcement Grant 
$5,000. 

6. Governor's Highway Safety 
Bureau Equipment Grant $4,000. 

7. Governor's Highway Safety 
Bureau Pedestrian Safety Grant $3,500. 

8. Governor's Highway Safety 
Bureau Safety Mini Grant $1,500. 

2. The D.A.R.E. Program is functioning and in 
full swing. The first two classes will graduate in 
January 1996. 

3. One additional Patrol Officer was added 
under the COPS Fast Grant. 



67 



4. The Central Dispatching move was finalized 
in August of 1995. 

5. All Dispatchers were trained and certified in 
Emergency Medical Dispatch, E-911 Statewide 
Telecommunications and APCO Federal 
Dispatch. 

6. Formulated the Community Response Unit 
which includes the Community Bike and River 
Patrol. 

7. Formed a Domestic Violence Unit and 
selected a Domestic Violence Officer. 

8. A Domestic Violence Grant has been applied 
for and we are currently, awaiting a response on 
this proposal. 

9. A proposed project to formalize research 
collaboration between the UMASS-Lowell 
Criminal Justice Department and surrounding 
law enforcement Communities Policing Study 
has been applied for and we are currently 
awaiting a response on this proposal. 

GOALS 

1. Continue our fight against drugs, by 
expanding education with the help of the 
D.A.R.E. Program and coupled with a strong 
enforcement of the drug laws, to eradicate drug 
abuse. 



68 



2. Expand the Domestic Violence Unit. 
Domestic Violence will always be a priority 
with the Chelmsford Police Department 
realizing that the best efforts of the department 
are not enough to stop the pattern of abuse. Our 
department plans to reach out to other agencies 
to assist us with our efforts. 

3. Expand the Community Policing Program by 
conducting a citizen's police academy. The goal 
of the academy will be to dispel negative 
misconceptions of the police while enhancing 
community understanding and mutual respect. 

4. Police facility/renovation/addition. The first 
step in the planning of a new police facility is 
underway, this being a needs assessment study. 
When this is completed, it will take into 
consideration a new facility, its' square footage 
and available surrounding land, in defining our 
current and future needs. We will continue to 
work with the Engineering Group and the Needs 
Facility Consultants as well as all other 
committees appointed by the Town Manager 
and Board of Selectmen, to assist us in the 
completion of a building that will serve the 
current and future municipal needs of the Town 
of Chelmsford. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the 
Board of Selectmen, and all Town Departments for the 
cooperation they have given to the Police Department 
during the past year. 



69 



I would also like to express my appreciation to 
all the Auxiliary Police for their continued dedication 
and support and to all the Members of the Police 
Department for the professionalism and dedication 
exhibited during the past 12 months. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Chief Armand J. Caron 



70 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

The Auxiliary Police Department Members 
assisted the Regular Force at a number of events this past 
year, such as WinterFest '95, Memorial Day Parade, Flag 
Day Ceremonies, Chelmsford Fire Department's Bike 
Race, Chelmsford High School Graduation security, July 
3rd and 4th Festivities, Chelmsford Police Department's 
Bike Safety Rodeo, security for schools on Halloween, 
security at Chelmsford High School for the Thanksgiving 
Football Game, Veteran's Day Celebration, and the 
Holiday Prelude. The Auxiliary Officers also assisted the 
regulars with the search for a lost child in the Freeman 
Lake area. The Auxiliary also assisted with traffic and 
crowd control at fire scenes and at numerous motor vehicle 
accident scenes as well. The Officers of the Auxiliary 
donated a total of 8,803 man hours to the Town. 
Operation Property Check was a great success keeping 
vandalism to a minimum. The statistics were: 

1994 1995 



Vacant House Checks 


2,700 


1,200 


School Checks 


14,652 


15,265 


Town Property Checks 


16,200 


16.750 



Total 33,552 33,215 

This preventative patrol by the Auxiliary prevents 
malicious destruction to Town property and saves property 
owners and the Town thousands of dollars annually. The 
Auxiliary Unit continues to sponsor the Law Enforcement 
Explorers Scout Post #370. Officers of Auxiliary train 
these young men and women in traffic control, search 



71 



techniques, firearms safety and other related law 
enforcement activities. 

I would like to thank the members of the Auxiliary, 
the Scouts and their families for donating so much of their 
time. Your volunteer assistance continues to make 
Chelmsford a better place to live. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager for their support, the Police Chief, the 
Superior Officers and the Patrol Officers of the Police 
Department for all their assistance and support over the 
past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 

AUXILIARY ROSTER 

Director-Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



William G. Amundson 
Bernard Battle 
Timothy B. Bourke 
Mark Cianci 
Paul Dean 
Michael DiGiovani 
Eric Gordon 
Michael A. Houston 
David Irvine 
Vincent Kraft 



David M. Leo 
Peter D. LoPilato 
Robert M. Outwater 
Kevin Proulx 
Ralph Roscoe 
David Tyler 
Craig E. Walsh 
David W. Walsh 
Gary R. White 



72 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 
REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER FOR 1995 



Citizen complaints answered 


1994 

855 


1995 

1,153 


Dogs picked up and taken to pound 


46 


84 


Violation citations issued 


15 


13 


Value of citation fines 


$475.00 


$450.00 


Funds turned into the Tov/n for boarding 

and other fees collected $300.00 


$290.00 


Dead animals picked up from streets 


66 


85 


Stray dogs disposed of 


26 


14 


Dogs returned to owners 


20 


70 


Animal bite reports 


23 


24 


Total miles traveled 


12,930 


12,167 



It is a pleasure to report for 1995, the problem of 
rabid raccoons in the area has been reduced considerably. 
However, all wild animals should still be considered 
dangerous and not kept as pets. 

Two thousand, nine hundred fifteen dogs were 
licensed in Town. Overall, dog owners are doing an 
excellent job in keeping their pets under control and 
healthy. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Franklin E. Warren 
Animal Control Officer 



73 



INSPECTIONS DEPARTMENT 

There were 75 new single family dwellings, and 
three commercial buildings. A total of 2,878 permits 
were issued which includes permits for single family 
dwellings, additions, renovations, alterations, tenant 
fit-ups, electrical, plumbing and gas permits only. 

# of Permits Type of Permit Total Fees 

605 Building $135,642.50 

693 Electrical 30,110.00 

1,580 Plumbing & Gas 28.792.00 

Sub Total $194,544.50 

Plus Certificates of Inspection, 

Yard Sales, Signs, Weights & Seals 8.525.00 

Total $203,069.50 

I would like to thank Elaine Casey, Principal 
Clerk, Joseph Shaw, Local Inspector, Kenneth Kleynen, 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector, and Dennis Kane, 
Electrical Inspector. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Inspector of Buildings 



74 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




(Front Row 1-r) Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasuer; Lynda 
Warren, Chairman; Sarah Warner 

(Back Row 1-r) D. Lorraine Lambert; John Cutter; 
Jaclyn Matzkin, Secretary; Nancy Knight, 
Vice-Chairman 



75 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library and Children's House 
25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees: 

Nancy Knight, Chairman 

Jaclyn Matzkin, Vice-Chairman 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 

Sarah Warner, Secretary 

John Cutter 

D. Lorraine Lambert 

Lynda Warren 

Circulation and Interlibrary Loan 

During 1995, the library circulated 366,018 
books, periodicals, videos, audiocassettes and compact 
disks - a 4% increase over 1994. In addition, there were 
9,492 interlibrary loans - a 33% increase. The museum 
passes were borrowed 1,482 times. This demonstrates 
the cost effectiveness of public libraries. If residents 
purchased these items, they could have spent 
$7,320,360! 

Reference Department 

Over 20,000 people used the Reference 
Department in 1995. Reference libraries answered 
13,294 questions - a 29% increase. Several new 
CD-ROM titles were purchased and the library ventured 
out on the information highway by providing Internet 
access and an on-line magazine index. On a daily basis, 



76 



the reference staff worked to introduce and assist 
patrons with the new technologies and products. 

The Children's Library 

The Children's Library serves the library needs 
of children from pre-school through fifth grade. 
Approximately 1,500 children (and adults) attended 156 
storytimes and special programs. School and group 
visits were welcomed throughout the year. There were 
800 children who participated in the Children's Summer 
Reading Program. 

Anna C. MacKay Library 

The MacKay Library circulated 41,568 items - a 
29% increase. The Friends of the Library supported a 
series of children's programs at MacKay including 
music, storytelling, and magic. MacKay's Mystery 
Book Discussion group met for its tenth year. MacKay 
also sponsored weekly storytimes, adult programs, 
introduced knitting circles. 

Community Services Department 

The Community Service Department brings 
people together to appreciate the existing resources in 
their library and community through library 
programming and collaborating with other community 
departments and groups. Working with the Schools, 
Police Department, Community Services Council and 
Cultural Council, it participated in the Take a Pledge 
Campaign, World AIDS Day, the Annual Activities 
Fair, Health Fair, Common Threads, and WinterFest. 
The Organizations Handbook and two booklets of 
poetry, written by community members, were 
published. 



77 



Volunteers 

Twenty-six volunteers worked 3,038 hours 
assisting the library staff. The library staff is grateful 
for their help and looks forward to working with them 
during 1996. The Friends of the Library (Clifford 
Choquette, President) participated in the Fourth of July 
parade and festivities. The annual booksale in 
September netted record breaking sales. The Friends 
purchased computer equipment, museum passes, and 
books-on-tape. They sponsored a variety of programs 
for all library departments. 

Library Facilities 

On May 7, 1995, the Adams Library celebrated 
its centennial with an old-fashioned birthday party. 
Over 200 residents participated. As the library begins 
its second century serving residents, the Trustees will 
continue to work with the Town to develop a feasible 
solution to space and access needs. 

Acknowledgment is given to the Board of 
Trustees, The Library Building Committee, Endowment 
Committee, Friends of the Library, Library Staff, and 
all our library volunteers and patrons for making 1995 
successful. 

Statistical Reports 

Moneys deposited with the Town Treasurer 
from fines, lost materials, and fees: $ 17,093.95 

Circulation 376,992 

Added Materials 13,771 



78 



Personnel 

Director: Mary E. Mahoney 

Assistant Director: Nanette Eichell 

Head of Reference: Beth Decristofaro 

Head of Children's Library: Cheryl Zani 

Head of Circulation: Linda Robinson 

Head of Community Service: Katherine Cryan-Hicks 

Head of Technical Service: Laura Kulik 

Maintenance: JohnReslow 

Chelmsford Public Library Building Committee 

Margaret Marshall, Chair 

Roy Perry, Vice-Chair 

John Cutter, Trustee 

Sally Jo Bernard 

Carol Gallozzi 

Ralph Hickey 

Nancy Knight, Trustee 

Robert Kuehn 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Trustee 

Jaclyn Matzkin, Trustee 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Trustee 

Alfred Sidel 

Sarah Warner, Trustee 

Lynda Warren, Trustee 

Library Endowment Committee 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Chair 
Jaclyn Matzkin, Vice Chair 
Kathy-Cryan Hicks, Secretary 
Clifford Choquette 
John Cutter 
James Decker 
Richard DeFreitas 
James Doukszewicz 



79 



Eileen Dufify 
David Ferner 
William Gilet 
Gina Lynch 
Jean McCaffery 
Dorothy Morris 
Kathy O'Brien 
Shirley Pearlman 
Glenn Thoren 
Barbara Weisfeldt 
Sandy Wilson 



80 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




(Front Row 1-r) Adam DeYoung; Wendy Marcks; Dr. 
Richard H. Moser, Supt. of Schools 

(Back Row 1-r) Judith B. Mallette; Anthony V. Volpe; 
Mary E. Frantz; Anthony Taranto 



81 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Chelmsford School Committee at the end of 
the 1995 calendar year consisted of Mrs. Wendy 
Marcks, Chair; Mrs. Judy Mallette, Vice Chair; Mrs. 
Mary Frantz, Secretary; Mr. Tony Volpe, Member at 
Large; and Mr. Angelo Taranto, Member at Large. 
Central administration for the school department 
included Dr. Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools, 
Dr. Karen Mazza, Assistant Superintendent for 
Curriculum and Instruction; Mr. Bernie DiNatale, 
Director of Educational Technology; and Mr. Bob 
Cruickshank, Business Manager. 

The work of the Chelmsford School Committee 
during 1995 focused primarily on the development of a 
Chelmsford Citizen's Committee to assist in the 
development of a long range plan for the Chelmsford 
Schools. The Chelmsford Citizen's Committee has been 
comprised of eighty five teachers, administrators, 
parents, and community members organized around five 
planning subcommittees: Futures Subcommittee, 
District Instructional Council, Technology 
Subcommittee, Facilities Subcommittee and Finances 
Subcommittee. At the time of this writing the 
Chelmsford Citizen's Committee is nearing completion 
of its work. It is anticipated that a detailed long range 
plan will exist in key curricular, administrative and 
financial components of the school department. 
Strategies and action plans will guide our future in 
achieving the goal of providing the best possible 
educational program for our youth. 



82 



The State of Massachusetts has continued its 
program of education reform. The Chelmsford Schools 
had added time to the school day for the 1995-96 school 
year to meet the State's "Time and Learning" 
expectations. Curriculum frameworks have been 
developed in all academic disciplines. The purpose of 
the frameworks is to establish a directon for curriculum 
and instruction that provides standards for student 
success and, at the same time, flexibility for local 
school district initiatives. A major new initiative for 
1995 has been the expectation that each school district 
will develop a revised set of performance standards for 
our professional staff. The standards will outline the 
expectations for performance and set the tone for the 
restructuring of a professional evaluation system for all 
professional employees. 

Student enrollment in our schools has continued 
to grow at approximately one hundred students per year. 
Our elementary schools remain crowded in anticipation 
of Center School reorganization by 1999. The middle 
schools have completed their reorganization into two 
middle schools housing students in grades five through 
eight. Our high school has experienced minimal student 
growth, but it has become the new home of our central 
office. 

School councils have continued to provide an 
avenue for parent and community input into the 
operation of each school. Councils have developed 
improvement plans for each school. Their goals have 
been coordinated with the direction set by building 
principals and the efforts of our central administration. 



83 



The Chelmsford School Committee has 
appreciated the on-going efforts of parents, staff and 
community members in supporting the educational 
programs of our school system. The success of our 
students in the classroom, on our athletic fields and in a 
variety of extra curricular activities is due to the 
combined effort of many individuals and groups. We 
are proud of our schools and look forward to the 
completion of a successful school year. 



84 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL 
OF CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

As both the state and nation initiate reforms for 
public education, Chelmsford High School continues to 
demonstrate leadership through the achievements of our 
students and faculty while continuing the research new 
strategies to help all our students experience their full 
potential. The support of our community has allowed 
such efforts to be effective. 

In January, 1995, the Alternative Night School 
Program was initiated. This program allowed students 
who have continued to experience failure in our regular 
day program and some who had withdrawn from school 
to complete their academic program in smaller classes 
in the evenings while obtaining employment or 
undertaking community projects during the day. The 
program produced exceptional results with 80% of the 
enrolled students experiencing success, including five 
students completing the requirements needed to receive 
a diploma. The Alternative Night School, under the 
director of Mr. Thomas Sousa, provides a positive and 
effective education for these students at a fraction of the 
amount it would have cost to place one student in a 
similar program outside of our system. 

The School Committee recognized the need for 
more administrative support and approved the 
reopening of Emerson House. The administrative team 
opening the academic year 95-96 included Stephen 
Meidell, newly appointed principal, Allen Thomas, 
Dean Hawthorne House, Bernard Battle, Dean Whittier 
House, and Jeffrey Doherty, Dean of the Emerson 
House. 



85 



Our students continued to demonstrate 
exceptional efforts and achievement in classes, 
activities and athletics. We had 4 Merit Scholar Semi 
Finalists from the class of 1996. In the Northeast 
District Senior Festival, twenty two CHS students were 
selected for the District Festival and twelve students 
were recommended to audition for the All-State 
Festival. In addition, we had five students receive the 
highest score on their respective instruments and 
awarded First Chair for Orchestra, Band and Jazz Band. 
Chelmsford High was distinguished by having two 
students recognized by the National Council Teachers 
of English for Achievements in Writing, a unique 
achievement with only 15% of all applicants nationally 
being recognized. A majority of our students have 
performed exceptionally well academically as 
demonstrated by our school's profile on SAT, AP, 
Metropolitan Achievement, and the state MEAP tests, 
and by the number of students achieving Dean's List, 
Honors or High Honors status each term. 

During Spirit Week, the Class of 1996 placed 
first in all events, the first time a class has achieved "a 
sweep". In the competitive Penny Wars, our students 
raised over one thousand dollars for the Santa Fund. 
The Powder Puff game was expanded to include a JV 
game with the Class of 1998 defeating the Class of 
1999 and the Class of 1997 defeating the senior class in 
the annual rivalry. This high level of school spirit is a 
trademark of our athletes in interscholastic competition 
even where it is not a championship season, a fact 
which is a further measure of the fine character of our 
students. 



86 



Our faculty continues to be involved in 
professional development through workshops, 
conferences and course work. Several members of our 
staff have published articles in professional journals or 
been invited to present at regional and national 
conferences. The most meaningful achievements of our 
professional staff are the letters of appreciation received 
by graduates and the recognition for "making a 
difference" from colleges where our post graduates are 
attending. Our activity advisors and coaches continue 
to provide opportunities for our students to explore their 
full potential and talents - and for this they are 
recognized. Allen Thomas was elected to the Swim 
Coaches Hall of Fame. 

The future presents many changes for CHS. The 
School Management council developed a School 
Improvement Plan which has focused on studying 
alternative schedules. In looking at how learning time 
is divided during our academic day, the faculty and 
administration, with input from students and parents, 
hope to identify a schedule which will provide optimum 
conditions to serve all students with various learning 
styles. This will not only allow us to meet the state 
mandates on time and learning, but will also allow us to 
continue to develop effective teaching strategies to 
prepare our students for a changing world. 



87 



FROM THE PRINCIPALS 
OF THE CHELMSFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL 

This year, both middle schools are housing 
students in grades five through eight. As part of the 
organizational structure of the middle schools, students 
at all grade levels are grouped into instructional teams. 
This structure allows the staff, working as a team, to 
modify curricula to meet the individual needs of the 
students. 

Each school has completed the reorganization of 
the computer laboratory facilities. Each fifth and sixth 
grade classroom is scheduled into the computer lab 
during one-half of the year. Students receive instruction 
in word processing, databases and spreadsheets. At all 
grade levels, students are scheduled into the computer 
laboratory through their academic classes. Technology 
is utilized to support the classroom curriculum 
whenever appropriate. The students also utilize their 
technological skills to research information through the 
library centers for individual projects. 

This year for the first time, in cooperation with 
the Chelmsford Police Department, the drug abuse 
resistance education program (DARE) is being taught to 
all fifth grade students. Once a week for seventeen 
weeks Officer Todd Ahern meets with the children in a 
classroom setting. The students are taught to resist 
drugs in their lives and to make good decisions. The 
program is one that is both important and well received 
by the students. 



88 



Each middle school continues to develop and 
strengthen their peer mediation program. In this 
program, students working with staff members help 
other students to resolve issues and conflicts. Both the 
students and staff members have received training in 
helping to mediate problems between students. 

Throughout the year, staff members continue to 
work on committees to review and revise various 
curricula. Several staff members have been involved in 
portfolio and authentic assessment workshops. The 
administration and staff have worked to restructure the 
day to meet the new time and learning requirements. 

The administration and staff of the middle 
schools would like to thank the PTO and the School 
Councils for their continued support of the schools and 
programs. 



89 



FROM THE OFFICE OF 
STUDENT/COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Office of Student/Community Services 
(now located next to the Main Office at Chelmsford 
High School, 251-5151) continues to be extremely 
busy. Student/Community Services oversees the 
Guidance Department K-12, all child care programs, 
Community Education Night School and Summer 
School. 

Evening Community Programs run Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings three semesters per year, offering a 
variety of academic and special interest courses. Watch 
for our Fall brochure in late August and our 
Winter/Spring brochure in early January. 

Child care programs are flourishing and we offer 
preschool for 3 and 4 year olds, full-day 
kindergarten/child care; before- and after-school 
extended day, vacation and snow day programs, as well 
as a nine-week summer camp. 

Summer School continues to service the Greater 
Merrimack Valley and offers both enrichment and 
remedial programs to both students and adults during 
July and August. 

All programs run on a self-supporting/tuition 
basis. Information on all programs can be obtained by 
calling the Office of Student/Community Services at 
251-5151. 



90 



GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

The Chelmsford High School Class of 1995 
achieved many honors and awards, academically, in 
athletics, and in their extracurricular activities. The 
community should be proud of them. 

For three years in a row, over 90% of our 
graduates continue on with higher education. Average 
SAT scores of verbal 461 and math 501 for this class 
are above both the state and national averages. During 
May, 235 Advanced Placement (AP) examinations were 
given and 72% will receive advanced college credit. 

While we are proud of our students' success, we 
continue to work with all students' academic and 
personal concerns. Our dropout rate is less than 2% and 
we are instituting a variety of programs at both the 
middle school and high school. Student Assistance 
Programs, Alternative Night School and clinical 
psychologists have become part of our Student 
Services. 

The Guidance Department, staff and 
administration continue to support the needs of all 
Chelmsford students. 



91 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

The next couple of years represent a sizable 
investment in time, planning, testing, and 
implementation of a new computer platform to perform 
school administrative computer applications. This 
effort was seeded by a school capital improvement 
warrant of $150k. Starting with the move of our 
Central Office to the High School, there will be a total 
revamp of our hardware and software platform. The 
DEC 11/44 (15 years old) and VAX (13 years old) 
minicomputers will run parallel to the new system for 
approximately one year. At the end of that time we will 
reuse some of the peripheral equipment and resell the 
minicomputers on the used computer market or make a 
donation to the Smithsonian. 

Munis, the new financial system, will be 
implemented in the Spring of 1996. Munis is 
compatible with the Town financial software and will 
eliminate redundancy and increase our reporting 
capabilities. The financial package will require a 
parallel system until the Business Manager or Director 
of Data Processing signs off on the successful 
completion of each module. 

With the passage of the Education Reform Law 
in 1993, the school district is required to develop 
district and individual school technology plans. The 
school system has been working on this formidable 
technology project since the Spring of 1995. By the 
Summer of 1996 we hope to have a workable 
administrative and school technology plan which will 



92 



better prepare our students for success in life and the 
workplace. 

The administrative technology plan, although 
still in draft form, would lay out a scenario of a Novell 
local area network at each school with 486 or Pentium 
micro- computers with printer, fax, and modem 
capability. Each school will have a dedicated or a dial 
up line to communicate with the financial system on an 
IBM 6000. This UNIX based platform will interface to 
Novell and permit users to access a wide range of 
multi-vendor resources, such as work stations, LANs, 
applications, databases, printers, and other peripherals. 
A typical school would have a local area network with 
data and telecommunications which will enable 
administrative computing for: 

o financial management 

o electronic mail and/or fax 

o student information 

o personnel management 

o inventory and fixed assets 

o food service 

o transportation 

o special education 

o word processing 

o spreadsheet 

o databases 

o desktop publishing 

o schools information exchange 

o dedicated or dial up capability to: 
Dept. of Ed. 
Mass Ed. On-Line 
Internet 

Merrimac Education Center 
Town Information Exchange 



93 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

ENGLISH 

(GRADES 6 - 8) 

During the past year the Language Arts 
Department has been active in many spheres. There 
have been many programs involving the students, and 
staff have been very busy as well. 

We are still competing in the WordMaster 
program. Our eighth grade scored tops in the nation for 
the year; our McCarthy seventh graders scored seventh 
in the nation for the year. While the purpose of the 
program is to learn to deal with analogies more 
effectively, to learn about shades of meanings, and to 
tap the higher thinking skills, it's still exciting to know 
that our students scored as well. 

In the spring, our sixth graders were treated to a 
visit from Sharon Wooding author of The Painter's Cat . 
The program, funded by the McCarthy PTO, acquainted 
students with the writing process as experienced by a 
published author. The students and teachers used Ms. 
Wooding's presentation as a source for writing their 
own stories. 

Students at all grade levels and in both middle 
schools continue to attend various performances by 
different theater groups. These field trips proved very 
worthwhile in themselves but also because of the 
follow-up activities developed by the staff. 

The seventh and eighth grade language arts staff 
completed comparing and contrasting and piloting the 
new composition based language text. Approved by the 



94 



School Committee, the text was implemented for the 
opening of school in September. We are currently 
learning to use the text and all of the supplementary 
materials available to support both teacher and students. 
We are quite pleased with the selection. 

The department is also excited about having 
Macintosh computers in our classrooms at grades seven 
and eight. We look forward to developing several 
literary magazines of our students' works and to using 
computers to assist in instruction for enrichment and 
remediation. 

The staff is currently exploring the curriculum 
frameworks developed on the state level and supported 
by the Chelmsford Public Schools We are evaluating 
what we are currently doing in our classes and how our 
curricula reflect the frameworks. 

Finally, we have been working with members of 
other departments to develop interdisciplinary units and 
to incorporate the teaming concept at all grade levels in 
the two middle schools. 



95 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

ENGLISH 

(GRADES 9 - 12) 

Two new members were added to the English 
Department for the 1995 - 1996 school year. Mary 
Deislinger, a Magna Cum Laude graduate of the 
University of Massachusetts, Lowell, received her 
Master's Degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the 
same institution in 1994. Christopher Dangel, a 
graduate of Trinity College spent his junior year at York 
University in England and earned his Master of Arts in 
Teaching from Tufts University. In addition to his 
classroom responsibilities, Mr. Dangel is coaching 
junior varsity soccer. 

217 freshmen participated in the National 
Language Arts Olympiad, a test of achievement in 
reading, vocabulary, and English usage taken by 
students across the country. Chelmsford High School's 
overall score placed twelfth in the nation. In individual 
scoring Laura Burt was honored as one of our national 
student winners for 1995. Eight other freshmen 
received certificates and medals to mark their 
achievement. 

Dimitri Varmazis and Melissa Eckhardt, both 
members of the Class of 1996, were selected from more 
than 3,000 students nominated as outstanding writers by 
the high school English departments in the 50 states, the 
District of Columbia, Canada, and American Schools 
abroad as recipients of the National Council of Teachers 
of English Achievement in Writing Awards. 
Chelmsford is one of only two Massachusetts high 
school represented by two winners. 



96 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FINE ARTS 
(GRADES K-12) 

The Fine Arts Curriculum Review Committee 
was formed and then distributed a survey to parents to 
students in the schools as a basis for a report to be 
presented to the School Committee in early 1996. This 
analysis will provide the basis for the redesign of the 
entire curriculum which will be based upon the new 
Massachusetts Department of Education's "Arts" 
Frameworks document. 

In the music area of the Fine Arts Department, 
the Town-wide Choral Festival drew a capacity crowd 
to the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium in March 
to hear students from grades four through twelve 
display their performing abilities as vocalists. Each of 
the seven schools performed concerts for parents, 
relatives and friends in May and in December. These 
concerts featured bands, choruses, recorder ensembles, 
string orchestras and short musical and dramatic 
presentations. The high school musical, "Brigadoon", 
in May, once again drew "standing room only" crowds 
to the McCarthy Auditorium and the annual "pops" 
Concert at the Chelmsford Elks Hall was an outstanding 
display of the culmination of the entire year's work. 
The high school's marching band continued its growth 
in size and quality, performing at ten football games, as 
well as the annual Memorial Day and Fourth of July 
parades in Chelmsford. The marching band, through 
the cooperation of the School Department, the 
Chelmsford Friends of Music and donations from the 
community at large, received new marching uniforms in 
September. Additional performances of the band were 



97 



at the Hellenic College Graduation ceremonies in 
Brookline, as well as parades in Tewksbury and Salem, 
NH. 

On the visual arts side of the department the 
annual "Youth Art Month" exhibition at the Page 
Gallery in the Parker Middle School/Administration 
Building had student art work from grades one through 
twelve on display for the entire month of March. The 
monthly exhibitions in the gallery continued as well. 

Numerous individual arts students were honored 
through selection for various prestigious performing 
groups or exhibitions. Several visual arts students were 
chosen for the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Show and 
for Art All-State which is sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Art Educators Association. 
Additionally, two students had their work exhibited on 
the national level at the Scholastic Art Show in 
Washington, D.C. at the McCormack Gallery. Many 
music students were selected through rigorous audition 
processes for the All-State, Senior and Junior District 
Festivals sponsored by the Massachusetts Music 
Educators Association. One student from Chelmsford 
was chosen for the Eastern Division Music Educators 
National Conference (MENC) Chorus in Rochester, 
NY. That so many students from Chelmsford were 
among those selected for these prestigious awards and 
events speaks highly of the strength of the arts 
education programs in our schools. Through the Arts, 
students learn self-discipline and cooperation, two skills 
that will transfer to whatever vocation they choose to 
follow after completing their formal education. 



98 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(GRADES 7-12) 

Foreign languages and cultures were celebrated 
in the spring with activities at McCarthy, Parker and 
CHS. The middle school students participated in a 
variety of activities during Foreign Language week in 
March. Parents and staff at Parker were invited on 
Friday of that week to sample a variety of foods 
prepared by the French and Spanish classes. Several 
students participated in the poster contest sponsored by 
the Massachusetts Foreign Language Association; and 
two, Amy Meidell from Parker and Oliver MacLachlin 
from CHS, were awarded honorable mentions for their 
work. Mr. Tymowicz's students participated in his 
annual international food festival and Mrs. Deschene 
organized another successful exchange trip to Quebec. 
Foreign language students at CHS saved their 
enthusiasm and talents for Celebration of Learning in 
April, There were displays, video and live 
presentations, and all kinds of food items which were 
thoroughly enjoyed by all who attended. 

In September, the full language program, 
including 8th grade Spanish and French and FLEX, was 
implemented at Parker. The new French text already 
being used last year in the 7th grade classes was 
introduced into the 8th grade classes. At CHS, the 
French series adopted last year was also extended to 
French 2. 

More students than ever before took the French 
and Spanish Achievement Test with Listening. The 
College Board continues to offer this particular exam on 



99 



only one date in November. For the second year in a 
row, in September, Mrs. Davis' Latin 4 students 
participated in the Latin Contest sponsored by Boston 
University. Students who take this exam compete for 
substantial tuition scholarships to BU, ranging in value 
from $20,000 to $75,000. 

In December, an organizational meeting was 
held to establish the Curriculum Review Committee for 
Foreign Language. The committee will begin the 
research phase of its work in January of 1996. 



100 



FROM THE CURRICULUM SPECIALIST 

FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES K-8) 

The nature of Mathematics is one of 
diversification in curriculum and aptitude. It is the 
mission of the Math Department to assist each student 
in achieving his/her individual potential. We have 
incorporated the use of hands-on math manipulatives 
and alternative assessments in the classroom in all grade 
levels. Students have been introduced to open ended 
and open response questions. Many students are 
keeping Math Portfolios. Chelmsford is participating in 
The Massachusetts Mathematics Portfolio Project , a 
state pilot which focuses on raising standards for all 
students and Mathematics Portfolios. Some of the 
students' portfolios in grades 4 and 8 will be submitted 
for state and national review. 

The University of Chicago Mathematics Project, 
Everyday Mathematics, has been fully implemented in 
grades K-3. Grades 4, 5, and 6 have implemented a 
new Houghton Mifflin mathematics program which 
addresses the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics Standards. 

Our teachers, in addition to teaching regular 
classes, are actively continuing their education in the 
areas of mainstreaming, updating curriculum, and 
researching new programs through the successful 
In-Service Workshop programs. Many teachers are 
attending portfolio training workshops. Teachers also 
attend various conferences including the National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional 
Conference and the National Conference which was 



101 



held in Boston, conference using math manipulatives, 
cooperative learning, heterogeneous grouping, 
integration, and alternative assessment. 

With the emphasis on problem solving, we have 
successfully introduced several math competition 
programs at the Middle School level to challenge all 
students. Approximately 1 ,600 students compete in the 
Continental Math League and New England Math 
League Contests. The success of our program is 
evident in the accomplishments of several students who 
achieved perfect scores and received recognition for 
their participation in Continental Math League and New 
England Math League. Brad Sullivan an eighth grade 
student at McCarthy received national recognition for 
having all perfect scores on the five Continental Math 
League Competitions. Our Math counts team qualified 
for the state competition. Our results in National testing 
reinforces our belief that our goals are achievable and 
that our methods are productive. 



102 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics 
Department continues to strive to maintain the level of 
excellence that we expect of ourselves. 

In order to address the recommendation of the 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and 
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, the 
Mathematics Department is deeply involved with the 
process of reform. 

Last year we piloted Reform Calculus in our 
Calculus A level class. This textbook was co-authored 
by Andrew Pasquale, a member of our department. We 
found this publication to be so challenging and exciting 
that we adopted this text in both our Calculus A and AP 
level classes. This year we are currently piloting three 
new texts in our A level classes. Merrell Algebra One, 
Merrell Algebra Two with Trigonometry and Merrell 
Geometry. Early evaluations from the piloting 
instructors have been very positive and we will 
probably move to adopt these textbooks over the next 
two years. 

The Mathematics Teachers at Chelmsford High 
School continue to work toward professional 
development. Twelve of our sixteen teachers attended 
the National Convention of the National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics which was held in Boston in 
April of 1995. Also, many of our department members 
have attended numerous and various workshops on 
Cooperative Learning. Using the TI-82 graphing 



103 



calculator in the classroom, Portfolio Assessment, 
Mathematics Framework Curriculum Revision, 
Alternative Scheduling and Grantwriting. Rebecca 
Nordengren and John Mosto co-authored an article 
published in Computing teacher which detailed a lesson 
that combined Mathematics and Physics applications. 
Also, John Ramalho, John Mosto, Rebecca Nordengren 
and Barry Ware co-wrote a CESAME Grant. 

If approved, this grant would allocate $15,000 to 
the Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department. 
This grant is renewable for up to four years. The 
purpose of this grant is to integrate technology and 
science into the Pre-Calculus classes at Chelmsford 
High School. 

All of our extra curricular teams (Computer 
League, Mathematics League and Calculus League) 
continue to excel and achieve. Coaches Richard Olson 
and Joseph Ford are to be commended for their 
outstanding efforts. 

The Mathematics Department also officially 
welcomed Thomas Gallagher to a permanent part-time 
position. Tom is currently teaching Algebra One 
classes, is teaching the Mathematics class the 
Alternative Night School Program, and is also the 
co-advisor of the class of 1998. 



104 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

READING (GRADES K-12) 

LANGUAGE ARTS (GRADES K-12) 

CHAPTER I COORDINATOR 

The face of reading instruction has changed in 
many ways, yet the desired outcome remains the same. 
We have come to realize that fully integrated approach 
to reading, one which includes all the language arts - 
reading, writing, listening, speaking, spelling - allows 
the student to make the connections necessary for 
strong comprehension. The goal of the Reading 
Department is joyful literacy for all. 

The school year 1994-1995 was a busy year for 
the Reading Department. Beginning in September 1994 
through 1995 all kindergarten through grade 6 staff 
were involved in workshops, staff development 
seminars and curriculum development activities 
revolving around the implementation of the new reading 
/ language arts program. The elementary schools 
participated in a variety of motivational 
outside-school-reading-programs such as "Parents as 
Reading partners" or "Book-It". Middle and high 
school students were immersed in reading and 
responding to the literature. The reading specialists 
were able to attend a number of events outside the 
school such as the annual conference sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Reading Association where they had the 
opportunity to listen and meet the authors of the 
literature that their children are experiencing as well as 
the professionals who were reporting on the current 
developments in literacy research. Classroom teachers 
and specialists have had the opportunity to visit other 
classes and other communities. 



105 



Nationally acclaimed experts in 

reading/language arts were invited to Chelmsford to 
report on the most current research findings around 
good literacy instruction. Dr. Jeanne Paratore and Dr. 
Richard Allington were guest speakers and visited some 
of our schools. Staff development around good literacy 
behaviors continues with workshops by Dr. Paratore 
and Dr. William Harp as well as other outstanding 
teachers and authors. 

We are pleased to be able to offer supportive 
reading services to all of our students from the 
elementary grades through the high school. We have 
come to realize the value of continued instruction and 
emphasis in reading and that this should not stop at the 
end of the elementary grades. Children learn to read by 
reading and they improve their reading skills by reading 
more and more. 

All Reading Specialists are certified as such. 
Depending on the school, grade level and needs of the 
students, the Specialist can be involved in 'in-class' 
support, 'pull-out' programs, literacy or book discussion 
groups, tutorials, testing, special projects, consulting 
with classroom teachers and the SPED team and 
conducting in-service meetings with their schools. 

We are fortunate to have the ability to offer a 
full menu of assessment to our students. The reading 
department is currently reviewing our assessment 
program. Exploring a more authentic assessment 
package has led us to participate in workshops with 
leaders in that field as we begin to develop our own 
method of portfolio assessment. 



106 



Chapter I has been renamed Title I and 
continues to face the challenge of a decrease in its 
allotment. Most of the Grant allocation continues to be 
devoted to the acquisition of Computer Technology, 
and a CD-ROM reading program. Title I teachers and 
the Reading Specialists are working in tandem to meet 
the needs of students in reading. Students who are 
targeted for assistance receive support in both their 
classroom reading program texts and on a computer 
driven literacy program. Responding to what research 
says constitutes best educational practices in reading, 
good literature is at the heart of the program with 
interactive capabilities of CD-ROM. Books are sent 
home as part of a daily outline as home-school 
connections are vital. The program is highly 
individualized for the students. Part of the instruction 
time is spent in a small group situation. The program is 
primarily, but not totally, a pull-out model, determined 
by student needs and time constraints. Realizing that 
early intervention is the most effective way to prevent 
problems, it is at the early grades that the students are 
targeted. Title I tutors, reading specialists and the 
director attempt to provide a team effort incorporating 
all instructional services. The most important objective 
of Project Independence is to insure continuity between 
classroom instruction and Title I instruction. 
Conferences with classroom teachers, parents and Title 
I tutors continue to be a top priority. 

We can assess, challenge and attempt to 
strengthen student's reading abilities but, in reality, the 
most important gift any of us can give to a student is the 
love and value of reading. 



107 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

SCIENCE 

(GRADES 5-8) 

The major goal of the middle school science 
program is to use hands-on curricula to teach the 
students how to think critically. In order to do this, the 
curriculum is designed to develop organizational, 
listening, note-taking, experimental, logical thinking 
and problem solving skills. The science program 
consists of General Science in grade five using the 
Smithsonian Science and Technology for Children Kits 
on Electric Circuits and Ecosystems and a unit on 
Oceanography. The sixth grade General Science 
curriculum uses the 1991 Macmillan Science in Your 
World science kit and text program. Both Life Science, 
in grade seven, and Earth Science, in grade eight, use 
the 1991-1994 D.C. Heath programs which involve 
activities written by our science staff and D.C. Heath. 

Outside resources are used to enrich the science 
curriculum. Trips are taken to various science sites 
such as the Museum of Science, Plum Island, Owascoag 
Trail, the Whaling Museum, and the Stone 
Environmental Camp program at Cranes Beach. The 
science clubs are involved in the Merrimack Water 
Testing Program through the University of 
Massachusetts, Lowell and an environmental project in 
the McCarthy courtyard. The PTO has organized 
assemblies from many different scientific resources on 
such topics as the rain forest, electricity, and chemistry. 
Community input has come from Hewlett-Packard who 
has provided grant money for the installation of the 
WBZ Weathernet Computer Internet Equipment. In 
addition, Hewlett-Packard provides us with updated 



108 



science audio-visual materials through their Science 
Screen Report videos . 

Science teachers have been reviewing and 
implementing the new state Science and Technology 
curriculum Frameworks. To support the new state 
guidelines, Merrimack Education Center training is 
being provided to middle school science teachers in the 
PALMS . GEMS and Science and Technology Kit 
programs. In addition, science teachers are 

participating in conferences/workshops, courses and in 
service programs on such topics as cooperative learning, 
inclusion, national and state standards, assessment and 
science curriculum development. 



109 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

SCIENCE 

(GRADES 9-12) 

This past years has been a very busy one for 
Chelmsford High and for the science department. We 
were quite fortunate to find a physics major to fill a 
part-time position. Mrs. Elizabeth Nahas is not only a 
physics major but also enjoys working with the younger 
students in the 9th grade physical science program. 

Besides the in-house committees that have been 
formed to investigate the structuring of the high school, 
every member of the department has been involved in a 
project that directly affects what and how they teach. 
For a mature staff to realize that the status quo may not 
be good enough and be willing to investigate possible 
methodology alternatives is commendable. All of the 
biology, chemistry, and physical science teachers, along 
with Mrs. Nahas and Mr. Ford, have been to workshops 
specifically on cooperative learning in the teaching of 
science. Our own Mr. Dennis Hunt conducted a three 
day summer workshop for the chemistry and physical 
science teachers. 

Many of us have been involved with the grades 
6 through 12 science curriculum committee. Over the 
past school year we met several times, including four 
days during the summer, to review and enhance the 
curriculum. As a result of this review we have 
instituted an environmental science strand that is 
entwined in the science curriculum for grades 6 through 
12. Our next project is to create an energy strand for 
the same grade levels. We hope to have as many as 



110 



four or five of these themes to make the science 
curriculum a cohesive one. 

Mrs. Mower, Mrs. Steele, Mr. Luce and Mr. 
Turner, as members of the science curriculum 
committee, attended the National Science Teachers 
Convention in Philadelphia. Mr. Turner also attended a 
week long seminar, "Key Issues", in Keystone, 
Colorado. He was sponsored by the 3M company. 

Mrs. Mamalis spent a week at MIT at a New 
England Science Teachers Workshop in technology and 
education. Mrs. Steele spent a week in Ohio as a 
presenter at the Institute for Teacher Development 
Through Ecology. She was a participant last year and 
was asked back as a teacher who had successfully 
implemented many of the concepts introduced in the 
workshop. Her classes were involved in the collection 
of pH of rainfall data for a nation wide project via the 
Internet. 

Mr. Tate and Mrs. Swierzbin spent two weeks of 
the summer at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell 
with the REMS program. Chelmsford High School sent 
five students to participate in this unique electronic 
magnet science school for science and math. 

Mr. Mosto and Mrs. Nordengren published an 
article in Learning and Leading with Technology 
magazine. The article is titled "A Preview of the 21st 
Century Mathematics Classroom", and is based on a 
math and science cooperative project that these two 
talented teachers authored and piloted during the past 
school year. 



Ill 



This is just a brief synopsis of how involved the 
staff is in attempting to stay current during this very 
exciting time in science education. We all thank you 
for your continued support and look forward to seeing 
you at the Celebration of Learning and the next open 
house. 



112 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD OF 
SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 5-8) 

The Social Studies Department got off to a good 
beginning. The 3 year plan to provide tests for the 8th 
grade was completed. The new teachers were hired, 
Mr. Stephen Murray and Mr. Bradford Morgan both 
Chelmsford graduates. We are fortunate to have them. 
Deborah Monteforte, Mr. Morgan and Mr. Simorellis 
were ensconced at Parker, thus completing the 5-8 
grade allocation for both schools. 

The department is attempting to make certain 
that all social studies rooms have maps of the world and 
of the United States -also- the hope is to have maps in 
all core subject areas. The 5th and 6th grades continue 
to do exceptional projects with an interdisciplinary, 
hands on approach. Recently, all fourth grade parents 
were invited to an open house where examples of 
student work was available for parents to peruse. A 
good informative time was had by all. 

The Social Studies Committee to study the 
curriculum K-12 is well under way. There was no 
shortage of volunteers for this committee as the 
department has always looked and continues to find 
better and more productive ways to meet the needs of 
our students. 



113 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 
SOCIAL STUDIES (GRADES 9-12) 

The Social Studies Department at the High 
School presently consists of fourteen members who 
offer a broad selection of courses. Students may choose 
from Political Science, World History, United States 
History, Asian Studies, Legal Rights, Economics, 
Consumer Economics, International Relations, 
Psychology, Sociology, the Holocaust, American 
Studies, and Modern Problems. We also offer advanced 
placement courses in American History, European 
History, and American Government. 

This year the department is focusing on planning 
the implementation of the new curriculum frameworks 
for Social Studies. All members of the department have 
participated in professional development workshops 
that include the following topics: learning styles, 
cooperative learning, alternative assessment techniques, 
the Social Studies Frameworks, integration of 
technology in Social Studies classes, and instructional 
techniques for large block classes. Donald Benson, 
Denise Coffey, Robert Lemire, and Richard O'Donnell 
have volunteered to work on the K-12 District- wide 
Social Studies Review Committee. The committee is 
analyzing the present Social Studies curriculum to see if 
it meets the goals of the new Social Studies Curriculum 
Frameworks. 

Donald Benson advised a group of fifteen 
students who successfully participated at Model United 
Nations simulations at St. John's Prep, Bentley College, 
and Harvard University. Denise Coffey advised a group 
of thirteen students who compiled a 3-1 record in Mock 



114 



Trial Competitions. We were very fortunate to have 
Dennis McHugh and Brian Sullivan volunteer as 
Lawyer Coaches. 

In September, our former Department Head, 
Bernard Battle, was appointed the new Dean of Whittier 
House and Richard O'Donnell became Department 
Head. 



115 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (K-12) 

During the past year the Health and Physical 
Education Department has focused on promoting 
wellness by providing a variety of programs for 
students and teachers systemwide. At the elementary 
level, students were presented an educational and 
entertaining performance called "FOODPLAY" which 
promoted good eating habits. A nutrition workshop is 
currently being planned for teachers as a follow-up and 
a student safety program has been scheduled for this 
spring. 

In the middle schools, tobacco education has 
been strongly emphasized through participation in the 
"Great American Smokeout" activities, performances of 
"Up In Smoke", and a student and parent presentation of 
"No Butts About It" ~ both lively, interactive tobacco 
education programs. Additionally the peer mediation 
program is currently being expanded to include both 
middle schools and the "DARE" (Drug Abuse 
Resistance Education) program is in place in grade five. 

At the high school level, students participated in 
a poster design project related to tobacco education. 
Their posters were professionally reproduced and will 
be displayed townwide over the next year. An optional 
tobacco education/cessation program has been designed 
as an alternative to disciplinary action for a student 
found in violation of the school's no smoking policy. 
The Improbable Players presented "Passing It On" a 
play about drug abuse and HIV/AIDS on World AIDS 
Day. Programs that emphasize alcohol education will 



116 



take place this spring including "10 Seconds" (a 
motivational speaker against driving drunk) and the 
annual staging of a mock drunk driving simulation 
before the senior prom. 



117 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

The Chelmsford Public Schools see the 
successful integration of technology into the 
educational process as a means to help achieve their 
mission. The application of appropriate technology will 
make possible the aligning of students' learning needs 
with curriculum objectives, instructional methodologies 
and educational resources. Technology will also 
provide the necessary tools to support the management 
of the educational process and continuous support for 
the improvement of instructional effectiveness, 
efficiency and productivity. 

Student achievement is the primary focus of the 
application of technology in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools. 

It is important to note that technology is a tool 
of the learning process. Technology integration will 
provide the means to better manage the instructional 
process and thus provide the student an increased 
capability to access the curriculum and increase the 
ability to control his own learning, to foster the ability 
to think critically, to communicate effectively and to 
analytically solve problems. More student control over 
the learning process will better match educational needs 
with learning styles and rates. New technology will 
make possible learning opportunities not previously 
possible. 



118 



Many educational technology initiatives were 
undertaken during FY96 to support the educational 
process in our schools. The following is a summary of 
some of the completed and/or ongoing projects: 

o Expand the academic informational network at CHS 
to include the interconnection of all academic file 
servers and the distribution of the library resources to 
all workstations on the network. This includes the 
addition and distribution tuition of resources from 
multiple CD-ROM towers and the interconnecting of 
the academic networks. The goal is to extend network 
resources to all classrooms and instructional areas. A 
portion of the resources for this project was made 
available by a partnership with Hewlett-Packard Corp. 
of Chelmsford. The results of this project will serve as 
a model for other schools in the district. 

o The installation of an academic network 
infrastructure in both the Parker and McCarthy Middle 
Schools made possible by FY96 capital planning funds. 
The networking of our schools will continue over the 
next few years with a goal of having the academic 
network infrastructure in place by April, 1998. Our 
efforts and the provisions of the Cable Contract renewal 
agreement intersect April, 1998 with the completion of 
the Institutional Network which will connect our 
Municipal buildings. 

o The implementation of a pilot Internet connectivity 
project as a result of a partnership with Merrimack 
Education Center, Bay Networks and the Chelmsford 
Public schools. 



119 



o The implementation of new multiple platform 
(Windows & Mac) security software to be used on all 
academic workstations. Chelmsford was selected as a 
beta test site for this new product. 

o Additional multimedia computer workstations were 
added to all elementary schools as a result of the F Y96 
capital planning funds. Additional multimedia 
computer workstations were added to the Middle 
Schools made possible by a competitive state grant. 

o Professional development programs continue to be a 
primary focus. These programs are consistent with the 
Chelmsford Public School technology competence 
matrix. All offerings were oversubscribed and 
produced a waiting list. Our goal for FY97 will be to 
provide additional programs for the staff. 

o We are developing an integrated science application 
project by providing an on-line, real time weather 
station accessible from all schools in the district. This 
project is in collaboration with the Museum of Science, 
WBZ-TV and is sponsored in part by a partnership 
grant from Hewlett-Packard Corp. of Chelmsford. 



120 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
FOR ATHLETICS (GRADES 9-12) 

The Chelmsford High School Athletic 
Department during the 1994-95 school year fielded 31 
Varsity Programs, 24 Sub- Varsity Programs, and 3 
Seasonal Trainer Programs. An overall record from_185 
Varsity Contests was 241-129-15 with 1,076 Athletes, 
11 Team Managers, and 4 Student Trainers. The 
Varsity Girls Volleyball, Football, Boys Soccer, Field 
Hockey, Girls Indoor Track, Boys Swim, Hockey, and 
Boys Skiing Teams were Merrimack Valley Conference 
Champions. The Girls Volleyball and Field Hockey 
Teams were Division I North Sectional Champions 
while the Football and Hockey Teams were State 
Champions. 



121 



FROM THE FACILITATOR FOR 

PRACTICAL ARTS 

(GRADES 9-12) 

The Practical Arts Department at CHS consists 
of three unique areas; Business Education, Technology 
Education, and Family Consumer Education. 

In the area of Business Education a number of 
exciting events took place this past year. 

The Business Education Department introduced 
the use of computers in the Accounting classes. 
Preliminary work was done on Spreadsheets and 
relationship to Accounting problems. 

In addition, the Distribution Education Club of 
America at CHS distinguished itself at District 
competitions by monopolizing District Five by winning 
eight of the 14 marketing categories. At the State 
Competition six students from CHS qualified for 
National Competitions by finishing in the top three in 
their categories. At National Competition one CHS 
student finished in the top 10 in the nation. 

In the Industrial Technology Program the 
Engineering Drawing course is successfully using the 
Computer Aided Design system which will greatly 
benefit students who are planning to attend engineering 
programs in college. 

In the Family and Consumer Technology 
Department, Chefs classes prepare a variety of foods 
using the Basic 5 Food Guide Pyramid. Healthy menus 
are planned increasing the foods from the bread, cereal, 



122 



fruits, and vegetable groups while decreasing foods 
from the fats and sweets group. 

In the Family and Consumer Technology classes 
interior design and textiles and clothing construction are 
included as well. Decision making, value classification, 
cooperative learning, career exploration and individual 
expression are part of each course. 

This year the Exploring Early Childhood 
students have access to a wide variety of experiences 
working with children in the preschool, nearby 
elementary school, 2 special needs preschool classes 
and an extended day kindergarten now located at the 
high school. Students taking these courses learn child 
development theory and are able to see the growth and 
development of the young child first hand. Students 
develop age appropriate activities for the young 
children and explore future careers and job 
opportunities in teaching and working with children. 



123 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts' Chapter 66 and the Federal 
Government's Individuals with Disabilities Education 
Act (IDEA) were enacted to assure that all handicapped 
children have a free and appropriate education to be 
provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in 
Chelmsford is responsible for providing effective 
programs and services for children, ages three through 
twenty-two, who are found to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each 
handicapped student receives an education designed to 
meet his or her unique learning needs and to receive the 
services in the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1995, the Special Education 
Department had 850 students registered to receive 
special education services, which represents 15.9 
percent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of 73 special education personnel 
develop and implement the individual educational plans 
for these students. For those students with severe 
learning and/or emotional needs, Chelmsford provides 
for placement in private day or residential schools as 
approved by the State Department of Education. 

The department continues to expand and 
restructure its services in order to meet the diversified 
needs of the students. In partnership with the 
Merrimack Education Center, a Student Assistance 



124 



Program has been implemented at the McCarthy Middle 
School. This program is designed to assist students 
who require social/emotional support in order for them 
to progress effectively in their studies. 

The state's mandated new Individualized 
Educational Plan (I.E.P.) for students has been fully 
implemented. To accomplish this, all staff (Regular and 
Special Education) have had workshops on the writing 
and implementation of the I.E.P. 

Appropriate specialists at the middle school and 
high school levels have been involved in workshops to 
provide a specialized reading program for the students 
who require such a program. 

Staff are constantly being updated on new and 
improved methods of assessment and instruction. The 
department is currently replacing its computers in order 
for staff and students to take advantage of the computer 
program available to them. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department 
has a budget of $4,912,917 of which $356,310 is 
provided through grants by the federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue 
its quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs 
and services for the children we serve. 



125 



IN MEMORIAM: 

The Community and the School Department 
were grieved by the deaths of Allan Haley, Custodian at 
the Westlands School, and Carl A. Olsson, Chelmsford 
School Committee Member. They will long be 
remembered for their devotion to the children of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Submitted by: 

Richard H. Moser, Ph.D. 
Superintendent of Schools 



126 



IN CONCLUSION: 

The School Committee wishes to extend deep 
appreciation to the following staff members for their 
years of loyal and meritorious service and who have 
retired this past year: 



TEACHERS : 
Elizabeth Bastian 
Minni Collins 
Donald Eliasen 
Barbara Hines 
AnnMahan 
Marianna Renzulli 



Gr. 5 Teacher, McCarthy School 
Gr. 5 Teacher, Parker School 
Engl.Teacher, McCarthy School 
P.E. Teacher, Harrington School 
Gr. 2 Teacher, Westlands School 
Kinder. Teacher, Westlands 



NURSES: 
Lillian Cleary 
Maureen Perry 



L.P.N., Chelmsford High School 
R.N., Chelmsford High School 



SECRETARY: 
Jeanette Spang 



Executive Secretary to the 
Superintendent 



SUPPORT PERSONNEL: 

Margaret Theroux Instructional Support Personnel, 

Special Education Department, 
Chelmsford High School 



CUSTODIAN: 
Ernest Brown 



Head Custodian, Parker School 



127 



NASHOBA VALLEY 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The NVTHS District serves the towns of 
Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, Pepperell, Shirley, 
Townsend, and Westford. 



District School Committee 



Stratos Dukakis 


Chelmsford 


Charla Boles, CHMN 


Groton 


Irene Machemer 


Townsend 


Doug Morin 


Westford 


Samuel Polten 


Chelmsford 


Sharon Shanahan 


Chelmsford 


Robert Union, SEC 


Westford 


Augustine Kish, VCHMN 


Littleton 


Joan O'Brien 


Westford 


Garry Ricard 


Pepperell 


Benjamin Wales 


Pepperell 


Richard White 


Shirley 


Alternates 




Mary Jo Griffin 


Chelmsford 


Leo Dunn 


Westford 


James Nugent 


Littleton 


Al Buckley 


Pepperell 


Heidi Shultz 


Shirley 


Barbara Sherritt 


Townsend 



128 



Administration 



Fred H. Green 


Super- 


-Director 


David McLaughlin 


Assistant Dir/Princ. 


Victor Kiloski 


Academic Curr. Coor 


Robert O'Meara 


Special Ed/Student 




Service Coordinator 


Ralph Dumas 


Accounting Manager 


Student Council 




Nancy Antos 




Parent 


Richard Bye 




Parent 


Joseph Goldstein 




Teacher 


William Lekas 




Teacher 


Cindy Martin 




Parent 


David McLaughlin 




Admin. 


Len Olenchak 




Business 


Thomas Ryan 




Teacher 


Sharon Shanahan 




Parent 


Barbara Sherritt 




Parent 


Daniel Toombs 




Community 


Jessica Marcinkewicz 




Student 


Robin Smith 




Student 


MISSION STATEMENT 





The mission of Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School is to provide the highest quality academic and 
technical education possible to prepare our students for 
their future success in a technical world. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School was 
founded in 1965 by the towns of Chelmsford, Groton, 
Littleton, and Westford to provide an opportunity for 



129 



vocational education for the students of this area. The 
school opened in 1969 with nine vocational areas (shops) 
and an enrollment of 255 students. By 1979, the Nashoba 
District expanded to incorporate the three additional towns 
of Shirley, Pepperell, and Townsend. Having outgrown the 
original facility, Nashoba expanded as well, and opened in 
1980 with an enrollment of 771 students. 

The Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
enrollment, as of October 1, 1995, is as follows: 



Chelmsford 


119 


Groton 


36 


Littleton 


16 


Pepperell 


101 


Shirley 


56 


Townsend 


78 


Westford 


54 


Tuitioned 


37 


School Choice 


43 


TOTAL 


540 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is 
accredited by the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges, Inc. and provides it students with on-the-job 
training, saleable skills, a co-op program, a high school 
diploma, a trade certificate, an opportunity for further 
education, and job placement. 

Each year, qualified seniors may elect to take 
advantage of our Cooperative Training Program which 
allows senior students to work in industry or business and 
receive valuable training in their chosen fields as well as 
wages. 



130 



The following programs are offered at Nashoba 
Valley Technical High School: 

Technical Programs 



Auto Body Repair 
Automotive Technology 
Carpentry 

Culinary Arts & Baking 
Data Processing 
Drafting Technology 
Electrical Technology 
Electronics 



Graphic Arts 
Horitculture/Landscaping 
Machine Tool Technology 
Medical Occupations 
Metal Fabrication & Welding 
Painting & Decorating 
Plumbing & Heating 



Freshmen explore all vocational areas before 
making a final vocation selection mid-way through their 
first year. This exploratory program enables students to 
make realistic choices, reflecting their needs, interests, and 
abilities. Students who remain in their selected shops for 
their remaining three years at Nashoba Tech and complete 
required core competencies receive a trade certificate in 
addition to their diploma. 

Instruction is divided between the vocational and 
the academic areas. Students spend alternating weeks in 
academic and vocational classes. The academic areas 
consist of the following: 

Academic Programs 



MATHEMATICS 



ENGLISH 



Algebra I & II 
Computation I & II 
Plane Geometry 
Applied Math I & II 



Composition I,II,III,IV 
Literature I,II,II,IV 
Tech Prep 
Applied Comm. I & II 



131 



Business Math 
Trigonometry 
Consumer Math 
Special Education 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Civics 
Geography 
U.S.History 1,11 
Entrepreneurship 
Special Education 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



Special Education 

COMPUTERS 

Keyboard Skills 
Computer Basics 
Computer Apps I, II, III 

SCIENCE 

Biology 

Applied Biology 
Principles of Tech. 1,11 
Chemistry 
Applied Chemistry 
Environmental Science 
Special Education 



SCHOOL TO WORK TRANSITION 



Supportive services are provided for those students 
entering Nashoba Tech with special needs. Remediation is 
also available for those who require learning on a more 
individual basis. 

To qualify for a diploma from Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School all students must complete: 



Four Years of 

English Composition 
English Literature 
Mathematics 
Physical Education 
Vocational Program 



Three Years of 

Social Studies 
Science 

Two Years of 

Health Education 
Computer Apps 



132 



Tech Prep 

The Tech Prep program parallels the College Prep 
course of study and presents an alternative to the existing 
educational programs. It prepares students for high skill 
technical occupations and allows either direct entry into the 
workplace after high school graduation or continuation of 
study which leads to an associate degree in a two year 
college. It presents a rigorous body of knowledge in a 
contextual setting and relates it to personal or social 
situations relevant to the workplace. The Tech Prep 
program integrates academic and occupational subjects, 
placing heavy emphasis on articulation from secondary to 
post secondary education. To date, Nashoba Tech has 
marticulation agreements with Middlesex Community 
College, Johnson & Wales University, Essex Agricultural 
and Technological Institute, Wentworth Institute of 
Technology, Franklin Institute, Hesser College, and New 
Hampshire College. 

Athletics 

Athletics, as part of the overall high school 
program, includes the following: 



Baseball 
Cross Country 
Ice Hockey 
Track & Field 



Basketball 

Football 

Soccer 

Weight Training 



Cheerleading 
Golf 
Softball 
Wrestling 



Varsity, junior varsity, and some freshmen teams 
are available for students participation. There are NO 
USER FEES required for any sport, thus insuring that cost 
does not exclude any student. Nashoba also has a no cut 
policy giving more students the opportunity to participate. 



133 



Nashoba provides an array of extra curricular 
activities in addition to our athletic program. 

Annual Ski Trip Open House 

Class Activities Sr. Trip/Banquet 

Dances Yearbook 

Field Trips Student Council 

Homecoming Student Against Drunk 
Junior/Senior Prom Driving (SADD) 

Mentor Program Student of the Month Recog. 

National Honor Society State Outstand. Student Prog. 

National Vocational Vocational Industrial Clubs 

Honor Society of America (VICA) 

Adult and Community Education 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult and 
Community Education Program is open to anyone of high 
school age or over. A variety of evening classes in 
technical, academic, and special interest courses are 
offered. This year approximately 1500 students will have 
enrolled in our Adult Education Programs. 

Originally founded as a vocational education 
facility, Nashoba Valley Technical High School continues 
to provide the residents of the district an opportunity for 
technical training and educational advancement. 

Philosophy 

The philosophy of Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School is to provide an educational facility for residents of 
the district, where they will receive occupational training, 
academic education and cultural enrichment which will 



134 



assist them in developing their potential and contribute to 
their becoming productive members of society. 

Our basic objective is to provide an education for 
all students with skills suitable for immediate employment. 
It is the aim of the school that students become self-reliant, 
responsible citizens, having pride in their vocations, 
showing concern for others and an awareness of the world 
in which they live. 

The school provides the students with academic 
skills necessary for success in pursuing continuing and 
higher education. Students are encouraged to enroll in 
courses necessary for success in higher education. 

Our philosophy provides educational opportunities 
for area adults seeking to change their vocation, to upgrade 
skills in their current field, and/or to pursue recreational 
activities. 

Nashoba Tech provides for the individual concerns, 
abilities, and capabilities of all students by using various 
instructional methods, material, and programs. 

Administration, staff, district residents, advisory 
committees, and students are involved both formally and 
informally in identifying the challenges and changes within 
the industrial technology field. 



135 



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136 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members: 

Ronald Pare', Chairman 
Harold Organ, Vice Chairman 
Gustave Fallgren 
Eileen Duffy 
Karen Wharton 
Leonard Richards, Alternate 
Karen Karpawich, Alternate 
John Coppinger, Alternate 

The Board of Appeals in 1995 had a year similar 
to the previous year. The Board had 23 petitions for 
Variances and 19 petitions for Special Permits. Projects 
requiring Board of Appeals action ranged from small 
additions to existing buildings to approval of a 320 unit 
retirement facility in the Drum Hill area. The majority of 
hearings were for residential projects. 

The Board also heard two Section 8 appeals. The 
Section 8 appeals were both requests that the Board 
overrule a decision of the Building Inspector. It was the 
first time any Board members could remember a Section 
8 appeal being filed. 

Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 
Variances 23 19 4 

Special Permits 19 15 4 

Compre. Permit 

Sect.8 Appeals* 3** 1 1 1 



137 



* Under a Section 8 appeal a grant affirms the 

appeal and a denial sustains the Building Inspector's 
decision. 

** One Section 8 appeal was withdrawn without 
prejudice and subsequently refiled. 



138 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
James K. Gifford 
Robert Kelley 
David Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 

This past year was a very active year for the 
Committee, coordinating the 1995 Annual Fourth of 
July Celebration. Special thanks, for funding and 
organizing the Annual Parade to the Chelmsford Lodge 
of Elks No. 2310, the Chelmsford Lions Club for 
funding and organizing the Annual Country Fair, 
Chelmsford Art Society for the Art's Festival Fair, 
Chelmsford Community Band, Cultural Council for 
funding a Musical Event, other Volunteer Groups. 

We thank the efforts and assistance received 
from Department Heads and their personnel of the 
Police, Fire, Highway, Parks and Public Works 
Department. Special thanks to the many volunteer 
hours by members of the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police 
and Explorers Troop. Appreciation was expressed to 
Steve Chinetti for his many years of Service with this 
Committee. 

Celebration Committee is now in the process of 
planning for the 1996 Fourth of July Celebration, it's 
29th, Annual Celebration. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Chairman 



139 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

Members: 

Suzanne Donahue, Chairman 
Paul Logan, Vice Chairman 
Mary St. Hilaire, Treasurer 
Cathy Favreau, Secretary 
Sue Books 
Matt Caiazza 
Ralph Hickey 
Len Olenchak 

Former Members: 

Anne Donahue 
Carol Miller 

In 1995 the Commission elected a new Chairman, 
Suzanne Donahue, Former Chairman, Ralph Hickey was 
appointed to the position of Americans with Disabilities 
Act (ADA) coordinator. Working out of the Town 
Offices, Ralph has been better able to monitor access 
issues as well as the implementation of the 1994 common 
victualer's policy. The policy requires that common 
victualer license holders must provide access in 
accordance with the ADA. 

This common victualer policy has become a model 
in the State as a means to promote access improvements. 
It has made both the Town of Chelmsford and the 
Chelmsford Commission on Disabilities leaders in creating 
sensible solutions to architectural barriers. Several towns 
have requested information on this policy as well as the 
Commission's work. In response, the Commission 
developed promotional packages and access brochures. 



140 



In addition, the Commission continues to monitor 
access in town at those sites not covered by the common 
victualer policy. The commission began in 1 995 with 3 1 
on-going access projects. 16 new projects were begun in 
1995. Out of the 47 access projects worked on during 
1995, 20 were closed. The necessary access modifications 
were made. 25 were progressing. Steps have been taken 
towards improving access. More work, however, needs to 
be done. 3 were closed without access modifications. 



141 



COMMUNITY SERVICE COUNCIL 

Members: 

Kathy Cryan-Hicks, Library 
Kit Harbison, Cultural Council 
Holly Rice, Recreation 
Matt Scott, Cable Television 
Jeff Stallard, Historic Commission 
Marty Walsh, Council on Aging 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council 
was formed by the Town Manager, Bernard Lynch to 
coordinate and expand Chelmsford's recreational and 
cultural opportunities. By improving and expanding the 
delivery of these services we hope to enrich the quality 
of life in the Town of Chelmsford as well as increase 
our sense of community. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council 
continues to deliver over 13,000 copies of the 
Chelmsford Community Newsletter to Chelmsford 
residents. The Chelmsford Community Newsletter was 
designed to increase the awareness of the programs and 
services that Chelmsford offers it citizens. These 
programs may be educational, cultural, recreational or 
all of the above. In addition to being a guide for 
seasonal activities, the Chelmsford Community 
Newsletter will provide information about the how and 
why of town services to better understand government 
operations. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council 
continues to sponsor the annual WinterFest events. 
This was an extremely successful and fun-filled 
weekend. A full slate of both indoor and outdoor 



142 



activities will be provided for the entire community for 
WinterFest 1996. Numerous organizations in town 
sponsored specific events at various locations 
throughout Chelmsford. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Council 
also organized a Community Volunteer Board. Local 
business and organizations who have volunteer 
opportunities for Chelmsford residents can post 
positions on the Community Volunteer Board located 
on the second floor of the Town Offices. This was 
created to allow residents the opportunity to get 
involved in programs and organizations within theTown 
of Chelmsford. 

The Chelmsford Community Services Concil 
would like to thank all who supported the Community 
Newsletter and WinterFest event. 



143 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Members: 

John Smaldone, Chairman 

Lynn LeMaire, Vice Chairman 

Bob Greenwood 

David McLachlan 

Christopher Garrahan 

Susan Carter 

Michael Jasinski 

Andy Sheehan, Land Use Coordinator 

The Conservation Commission had one of its 
busiest years in 1995. As has been the case for many 
years the majority of the Commission's time was spend 
administering the Wetlands Protection Act and 
Chelmsford Wetlands Bylaw. The Commission held 
hearings on 30 Notices of Intent, an increase of 50% 
over 1994. The Notices of Intent are primarily for 
larger projects and new construction. In addition, there 
were 27 Requests for Determination of Applicability 
filed. The latter were mostly for smaller projects such 
as additions to existing buildings. The number of 
applications to the Commission was the most since 
1987. The Commission also continued to vigorously 
enforce the provisions of the Wetlands Protection Act 
and Bylaw, issuing fines and Enforcement Orders. The 
Commission also succeeded in winning Town Meeting 
approval of some changes to the Wetlands Bylaw to 
make it easier to understand. In keeping with past 
practice, the commissioners conducted sitewalks of 
proposed and on-going projects. The Commission was 
aided in its work by the appointment of Michael 
Jasinski, who filled a vacant seat. 



144 



The Commission also made progress in the area 
of reservation management. Three Boy Scouts 
completed projects related to Conservation to earn their 
Eagle Scout award. Nick Papadonis constructed a 
boardwalk at the Margaret Mills/Crooked Spring Brook 
Reservation; Dan Keegan built and installed 50 bluebird 
nesting boxes; and Ben Jhola constructed a message 
board and 7 wood duck boxes at the Lime Quarry 
Reservation. The Commission also received help in 
mapping the trails and boundaries of the Lime Quarry 
Reservation from local author and naturalist Tom Sileo 
and the Commission received assistance from the 
Massachusetts Highway Department in constructing a 
second fence to keep motorists from entering the Lime 
Quarry Reservation from the rest area on 1-495. 



145 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

In the course of a year, the Chelmsford Senior 
Center receives many visitors from across this state and 
country. They consistently praise the beauty of the 
facility, the energy and involvement of our seniors, the 
courteous and responsive attitude of staff and the wealth 
of caring that is manifest through our various programs. 
We appreciate the fact that it has been your financial 
support, understanding, commitment and enthusiasm 
that has brought us to where we are today. We realize, 
however, that the accurate measurement of any human 
service agency is its proactive plan for future challenges 
and positive growth. 

Daily, the center bustles with activities that 
provide exercise enrichment, nutrition, stimulation and 
socialization. Last year, for example, the Congregate 
Lunch Program served an average of 230 people daily. 
The Meals-on- Wheels Program delivered over 22,000 
lunches to shut-ins; and our transportation service, 
which received a new 16-passenger bus, provided over 
7,000 trips. Adult Day Care gave compassionate and 
quality programming to 45 clients. Respite Care 
provided supervision and companionship for 43 elderly 
clients and 1 1 ,729 hours of service. The Senior Tax 
Rebate Program, which received an award from the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association and has gained 
national attention, placed 25 seniors in 11 municipal 
departments. Numbers are impressive in terms of 
understanding the scope of vitality of our programs, but 
the truest evaluation comes from the people we serve. 
Their appreciation, their involvement, their desire to 
give back, all contribute to the total effectiveness of 
providing meaningful and compassionate service. 



146 



Total funding for the Senior Center and services 
annually amount to over a half million dollars. The 
Town provides one-third, the remainder comes from a 
variety of sources including state and federal funds, 
program income and the consistent generosity of "The 
Friends of the Senior Center". In 1995 the "Friends" 
donated over $80,000 to the Town for building 
maintenance, programs and services. Volunteers who 
number close to 250 people, also contributed 
significantly to the Center's day-to-day operations. 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging will continue 
to work with the director to develop effective and 
responsive programming in meeting the needs of our 
older population. We also wish to extend our sincere 
appreciation to Town residents and officials for their 
continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Martin J. Walsh, Director 

Council on Aging Members: 

Arlene Leman, Chairman 

Maureen Evans, Vice-Chairman 

Lilla Eaton, Clerk 

Rose Arakelian 

Walter Cleven 

Madelon Clough 

Elizabeth Marshall 

Robert Monaco 

Peter Pedula 

Verne Woodward 



147 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members: 

Susan Carmeris 
Cathy Clark 
Judy Fichtenbaum 
Pat Fitzpatrick 
Kit Harbison 
Winnie Liakos 
Jean McCaffery 
Pat Pestana 
Nancy Vinkels 

Meetings: 1st Monday of the month, twice a month 
during Arts Lottery reviews 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is comprised 
of interested residents appointed to inform the public, 
qualify applicants and dispense funds allocated by the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC), a state agency. 
The budget of the MCC is determined on an annual 
basis by the state legislature. The Local Cultural 
Council's (LCC) primary purpose is to regrant state 
funds for local, community-based programs in the arts, 
humanities and interpretive sciences. Grant award 
decisions are subject to final approval by the MCC. 

In 1995, the Chelmsford Cultural Council 
funded 25 grants totalling $13,460. Students in the 
Chelmsford Public Schools directly benefited from 1 1 
of these programs. 

Accomplishments this year: In addition to granting 
state funds, LCC may choose to produce other cultural 
programs for the benefit of the community at large. 



148 



During the past four years the Chelmsford Cultural 
Council has taken an active role in enhancing the 
quality of life in the Town by promoting a variety of 
cultural events. Additional programs presented during 
1995 included: Lottery distribution of 40 

complimentary tickets to Merrimack Repertory Theatre. 
Produced Performing Arts Series, including opening 
night concert for the first annual WinterFest. 
Represented the Cultural Council on the Community 
Service Council. Held annual Community Input 
Meeting in March. Represented Chelmsford at a 
Regional LCC meeting in May. Hosted "Arts on the 
Common", weekly demonstrations by local artists, 
during July and August. Sponsored a Grant Writing 
Workshop in September to aid prospective applications 
preparing for FY96 state funding cycle. October was 
proclaimed "Cultural Month in Chelmsford" by the 
Board of Selectmen in conjunction with a national 
proclamation. The Cultural Council produced 
"Common Threads: Celebrating National Cultural 
Month in Chelmsford", a month-long series of 
participatory workshops and performance, in 
collaboration with the Council on Aging and 
Chelmsford Public Library. All programs were free to 
the public and funded through a Collaborative 
Assistance Grant from the MCC and Chelmsford 
Cultural Council funds raised at a December 1994 
auction. A new annual award, "Angel for the Arts" was 
presented to Jones Farm and Laughton's Garden Center 
for their ongoing support of cultural programs in 
Chelmsford. 

The resignation of Edie Copenhaver was 
regretfully accepted. Joyce McKenzie was recognized 
for six years of outstanding service to the Council. 



149 



New members Cathy Clark, Winnie Liakos, and 
Pat Pestana were welcomed. 

Plans for 1996 include: Funding two performances for 
WinterFest 1996. Community Input Meeting on March 
4, 1996. Continuation of Performing Arts Series. 
Continued representation on Community Service 
Council. "Arts on the Common" during the summer 
months. Ongoing efforts to maximize cultural 
resources and opportunites to Chelmsford residents. 



150 



OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 
John Abbott 
Walter J. Adley, Jr. 
J. Bradford Cole 
George R. Dixon 

The Chelmsford Emergency Management 
Agency (CEMA) meets the first Monday of each 
month, preparing various reports for the Federal 
(FEMA) and Massachusetts (MEMA) Agencies. 

Many volunteer hours were spent by members at 
FEMA and MEMA Seminars on Natural and Hazardous 
Materials Disasters. 

CEMA personnel wish to thank the Town 
Manager, Board of Selectmen, all Department Heads 
and their Personnel for their continuing cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



151 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Members: 

John Morrison, Chairman 
Hat Matzkin, Vice Chairman 
Marcia Dobroth 
Dwight Hayward 
Bev Koltookian 
Chuck Piper 
Barbara Skaar 
Susan Olsen, Clerk 

The Finance Committee is composed of seven 
members who are appointed by the Town Moderator, 
Dennis McHugh, to terms of three years each. The 
Committee is the arm of the Town Meeting. As such it's 
primary mission is to study and make recommendations on 
articles that are considered at town meetings. The 
Committee meets every Tuesday and Thursday from 
January through March to hear, analyze, and discuss 
departmental budgets presented by independent boards and 
various department heads. These budgets form the basis of 
the Town Manager's budget which is considered at the 
April Town Meeting. Based on it's deliberations, the 
committee makes a recommendation to the Town Meeting 
representatives on each budget line item. Throughout the 
remainder of the year, the Committee meets about twice 
monthly. 

The Committee also meets with petitioners, 
proponents and other interested parties with respect to 
warrant articles that are to be considered at April and 
October Town Meetings. After due deliberation, the 
Committee makes recommendations to the Town Meeting 
Representatives on these articles. 



152 



The Committee communicates with the Town 
Meeting Representatives and other citizens throughout its 
warrant books which are published for spring and fall Town 
Meetings. In addition to it's recommendations, the 
Committee includes financial data and other useful 
information in it's report. Susan Olsen, Clerk is responsible 
for the majority of the work in preparing this report. 

Each of the members is a liaison to various town 
departments, committees, and boards on all of their budget 
matters. There is also a FinCom member (John Morrison) 
who is represented on the Capital Planning Committee. 

There are periodic joint quarterly meetings with the 
Selectmen, School Committee, Town Manager and 
Superintendent of Schools to discuss financial matters of 
the Town and specific subjects which are of mutual concern 
to all three committees. 

In October, the Committee attended the Annual 
Meeting of the Association of Town Finance Committees 
which is held in Framingham and consists of a range of 
seminars which vary from "Reorganization" to "Education 
Reform" to Revenue Sources". The 1994 Chelmsford 
Warrant Book was awarded the Best report of medium size 
Towns at this Annual Meeting. 



153 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members: 

Margaret Dunn, Chairman 
Steve Stowell, Vice Chairman 
Robert LaPorte 
Brenda Lovering 
Joseph Marcotte 
John Alden, Alternate 
Bruce Foucar, Alternate 
Clerk, (open) 

The H.D.C. functions as a regulatory commission 
for the benefit of the Town. A small area of the Town's 
center section is under the Commission's authority. The 
objective of the H.D.C. is to provide an expeditious 
application and review process relative to the physical 
modification to the residences and businesses within the 
District. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of 
each month at the Town Offices. 

During the past year, the H.D.C. accepted 17 
applications for review; held 4 public hearings and waived 
13 public hearings. Fifteen Certificates of 

Appropriateness were issued and 2 Certificates of 
Non-Applicability were issued. No applications were 
denied. 

Major accomplishments during the year include the 
recodification of the Review Standards and distribution of 
the Standards to all residences and businesses within the 
District; completion of photo-documentation project for 
the District; participated in the "Daffodil Project" by 
sponsoring the planting of 400 daffodil bulbs in 



154 



Forefather's Cemetery; and continuation of redesign of 
application forms and entering records on computer disk. 

The members of the Commission wish to thank 
Mary Caffelle for her 16 years of dedicated service as 
Clerk. 



155 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

The members of this Commission met with Jane 
Drury for a review of the procedures for inventorying 
houses. This is an on-going project of the historic 
documentation of a property and determines the 
qualification for a historic house sign that can be placed 
on the house if the owner so desires. 

A report was sent to Historic Massachusetts, Inc. 
(HMI) for their Most Endangered Properties Program 
on the Old Mill House, the Scoboria House complex, 
the Paul Dutton House and the North Town Hall. A 
meeting was held with the representatives of the Adams 
Library to review the revised plans for their building 
addition. 

Pictures were taken of two properties before the 
demolition of the buildings that were 100 or more years 
old in cooperation with the Building Inspector. A letter 
of support for a $5,000 matching grant was sent to the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission Preservation 
projects Fund toward restoration work in the 
Forefathers Cemetery after a meeting with John Sousa, 
Superintendent of Cemeteries. 

Permission to use the 1802 Schoolhouse by 
certain responsible groups was granted. One case 
involved three different groups of school children from 
the Westlands School and one from the Byam School in 
conjunction with a tour of the Forefathers Cemetery. 
Also the Middlesex Canal tollhouse was utilized by a 
responsible group for dispensing tourist information and 
the Community Band last summer. 



156 



The members of this Commission are: John A. 
Goodwin (Chairman), John C. Alden, Florence H. 
Gullion, George L. Merrill, Linda Prescott, Martha 
Sanders and Jeffrey Stallard. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

John A. Goodwin 
Chairman 



157 



HOLIDAY DECORATING 
COMMITTEE 

Committee Members: 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman 
Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 
Linda Emerson 
Jean Kydd 
Jacqueline Wenschel 
Carrie Bacon 
Marie Massota 
Gloria Shoen 
Iris Larssen 
Tink Nussbum 
Ruthann Burkinshaw 
Karen Ready 

Departmental Mission Statement: 

The Holiday Decorating Committee is a group 
of volunteers who arrange and implement the Holiday 
Lighting and Prelude Ceremony in Chelmsford Center 
the first Sunday in December. The Committee, with the 
help of several interested individuals and groups, 
physically put up and take down all the lights on the 
shrubs and trees on Chelmsford Common, the Old 
Town Hall and the Chelmsford Business District. In 
addition to the lighting, we also arrange the hayride and 
assist "Santa" with the more than 500 children who 
come to see him. 

Budget: 

While the Committee is sanctioned by the 
Town, we receive no funds and work from donations 



158 



given to us by several groups and individuals. This year 
our fund raising chairman, Jacqueline Wenschel, did an 
outstanding job and raised enough money to purchase 
additional lighting, add a second hayride and pay all our 
lighting and electrical bills. We sincerely thank all 
those who gave so generously. 

Goals and Objectives: 

Our goal in 1996 is to have continued success 
with our event and draw more and more of our residents 
to the business district. We have received help and 
cooperation from our Police, Fire and Highway 
Departments and could not hold this event without 
them. We feel fortunate to have so many residents 
support our efforts and thank all those who give so 
freely of their time and talents to make this once a year 
event possible. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Donna A. Johnson 
Chairman 



159 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The year of 1995 will surely be remembered as a 
year of great accomplishments and profound sadness. 
The Chelmsford Housing Authority received approval 
for an Asset Waiver on all State Aided Elderly units, 
allowing applicants to have $40,000.00 in assets 
compared to the $15,000.00 in 1994. In addition, 
Housing and Urban Development awarded the 
Authority an additional 13 Section 8 Vouchers. Mary 
"Lisa" Royce, the former Executive Director re-joined 
the Authority after the Spring elections as a 
Commissioner. With a deep sense of loss, the 
Authority mourned the loss of the Chairman, dear friend 
and mentor, Ruth K. Delaney in January. In June, the 
Authority rededicated Delaney Terrace remembering 
Ms. Delaney's commitment to the community of 
Chelmsford and erected a flagpole in her honor. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as 
of December 31, 1995 provided a total of 419 units of 
low income housing: 198 elderly, 199 family, and 22 
handicapped. Four of these programs are funded by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Executive 
Offices of Communities and Development under 
Chapter 667, Chapter 705, Chapter 689, and the 
Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program. Chelmsford 
Arms completed in 1974, has 56 regular units and 8 
handicapped units. The Middlesex Community 
residence for the mildly to moderately retarded was 
purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. Six, two bedroom 
condominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased in 
1981. McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981, has 43 
regular units, 3 handicapped units, and a four bedroom 
congregate unit which serves the semi-independent 



160 



elderly. Delaney Terrace, finished in 1990, has 48 
units, 3 of which are handicapped and one, 4 bedroom 
congregate unit for the frail elderly. These 
developments are funded under Chapter 667. Under the 
705 Family Program, 11 units are scattered around 
Chelmsford. The Chapter 689 program is able to serve 
up to 8 individuals in the facility based respite care 
development located on Groton Road. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, 
Executive Director, Linda Dalton, Administrative 
Assistant, Nancy Harvey, Leased Housing Coordinator, 
Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Maintenance Laborer, 
Michael Harrington, Full-Time Grounds Keeper and 
Manuel Mendonca, Full-Time Grounds Keeper. 
Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday each 
month. The Annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in 
May. All meetings are open to the public. The 
Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners would like to thank the residents of 
Chelmsford and Town Officials for their continued 
support and cooperation. 



161 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members: 

Angela Cosgrove 
Joe Dyer 
Charles Tewell 
James Sousa 

Jeanne Parziale, Personnel Coordinator 

The Personnel Board meets on the second 
Wednesday of each month at the Town Offices. Special 
work sessions are scheduled as necessary. The Board 
consists of five members (four are appointed by the 
Town Manager and one is elected by non-union 
employees). In December, Will Perry, Chairman, 
resigned. His position remains vacant. 

The Personnel Board completed job descriptions 
on all non-union positions with signed approval of 
Department Managers and the Town Manager. 

During 1995, the Board completed and proposed 
a Classification and Compensation System to the Town 
Manager. This System is being reviewed for 
implementation. The Board adjourned its meeting until 
April 1996. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Jeanne Parziale, 
Personnel Coordinator 



162 



PLANNING BOARD 




Front Row (1-r) Tracey Wallace-Cody, Clerk; James 
Creegan, Chairman; Kim MacKenzie, Vice-Chairman 

Back Row (1-r) Eugene Gilet; Kevin Clark; Thomas 
Firth, Jr.; James P. Good 



163 



PLANNING BOARD 

Committee Members: 

James M. Creegan, Chairman 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Vice-Chairman 

Tracey Wallace-Cody, Clerk 

Kevin D. Clark 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

Eugene E. Gilet 

James P. Good 

Rayann E. Miethe, Principal Clerk 

The Chelmsford Planning Board was faced with 
many challenges over the last year as economic 
conditions made it desirable to build, once again. In a 
balance act of preserving individual property rights 
against residents desire to preserve the character of their 
neighborhoods, the Board has taken a more proactive 
stance. 

A number of subcommittees were formed to 
address areas of concern. The Master Plan Review 
Committee determined that the goals for the future 
growth in the town must be reviewed and new goals 
implemented through the towns By-Laws and rules and 
regulations. A subcommittee on Cluster Development 
reviewed the benefits and disadvantages of such 
developments and concluded the benefits far outweigh 
any disadvantages. It also determined that the name 
should be changed to clear up any misconceptions to 
"Residential Open Space Developments". A 

subcommittee on parking regulations has resolved many 
issues with respect to congested parking areas, as well 
as, excessive pavement in certain locations. The Road 
Bond Committee has successfully cleared up many 



164 



unfinished roads left by failed or negligent developers 
at little or no cost to the Town of Chelmsford. A recent 
subcommittee was formed to properly regulate Adult 
Entertainment and insure the character of our Town is 
preserved. 

In 1995, we saw the departure of two long term 
members. Christine Gleason, following her marriage, 
moved to Seattle, WA and Jack McCarthy left to 
concentrate on his business concerns. The two new 
members include Tracey Wallace-Cody, a local attorney 
and a life-long resident of Chelmsford, as well as, 
Kevin Clark, a resident of North Chelmsford and a 
professional engineer at Textron in Lowell. 

At the reorganization meeting of 1995, the 
Chelmsford Planning board elected their new officers. 
Mr. James Good was voted to continue as the Board's 
representative to the Northern Middlesex Council of 
Government. Mr. Kim MacKenzie continues to 
represent the Board on the Affordable Housing 
Committee. Mr. James Creegan represents the Board 
on the Traffic and Safety Committee. 

At total of 36 Planning Board Meetings and 
Subcommittee meetings, and 4 (four) Site Walks were 
held. At these meetings, 1 8 (eighteen) Public Hearings 
were held, 5 (five) of these were hearings resulting in 5 
(five) subdivisions approved and 6 (six) site plan 
permits issued. In addition, the Board approved (20) 
twenty Subdivision Control Law Not Required Plans. 



165 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Members: 

Robert Hayes, Chairman 

Michael Ablove, Vice Chairman 

Harry Ayotte 

Robert Charpentier 

Mary Jo Griffin 

Paul Murphy 

James Young 

Holly Rice, Recreation Coordinator 

Like all Town Departments, Recreation again 
was challenged by the budget crunch. Our goal to 
maintain our recreation programs on a self-supporting 
basis in 1995 was realized. 

The Commission hired a very competent staff 
for the 1995 Summer season, with Dan Johnson as the 
Summer Director. Dan supervises an excellent program 
servicing children of all ages. Registrations for our 
1995 Summer program has increased enabling the 
Summer program to remain self-supporting. The 
Commission also hired Kathleen Mulgrew as the 
Waterfront Director at Freeman Lake Beach. Kathleen 
oversees and instructs all swimming activities at the 
waterfront. 

Our Summer program included swimming 
lessons, a water adjustment program for three and four 
year olds, tennis lessons, track and field, basketball, 
baseball, and volleyball camps, and a very successful 
day camp at Varney Park. Recreation again sponsored 
several other not-for-profit sports camps, including field 



166 



hockey, wrestling, football, basketball, Softball, youth 
and high school age soccer. 

The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another 
successful project for 1995. Thanks to the continued 
financial support from Sully's Ice Cream, personnel 
supplied by The Courthouse, and help from local 
runners, we were able to preserve a long standing 
Chelmsford tradition. 

Our workreation volunteer program was 
implemented in 1995 and again was a great success. 
These young volunteers assisted with beach 
maintenance, and also helped with children in the day 
camp and may of the other summer programs. They did 
an exceptional job and should be commended for their 
dedication. 

The Recreation Department in 1995 offered 
several new programs during the Winter, Spring, and 
Fall seasons. Some of the successful programs 
organized for the Winter/Spring Season include Okemo 
ski trip, New York City shopping, Boston Pops, Line 
Dancing, Swimming Lessons, Nashoba Valley Ski 
Program, CPR Course, Aerobics, Penn Dutch, 
Rollerblading, Horseback Riding, Craft Classes, Boston 
Flower Show, and much more. 

The 1995 Fall season was a great success for the 
Recreation Department. The programs planned during 
this past Fall include the Baby-sitting Course, Health 
and Wellness programs, Montreal, New York City 
Weekend, Pumpkin Carving, Art for Kids Programs, 
Acting Classes, Santa is Calling, and the very 



167 



successful Line Dancing Program. Several additional 
programs were planned and provided very successful. 

New Recreation Commission members James 
Young and Mary Jo Griffin were welcomed. 

The Recreation Department will continue to 
develop programming in response to the growing and 
changing needs of all populations within the Town of 
Chelmsford. Programs organized by the Recreation 
Department will be advertised in the Chelmsford 
Community Newsletter which will be delivered three 
times per year during the months of January, May and 
September. 

The Recreation Commission would like to thank 
all who helped to make 1995 such a great success. 



168 



SEWER COMMISSION 





Front Row (1-r) Evelyn Newman, Departmental 
Assistant, John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Back Row (1-r) Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman, George 
Abely, Clerk, Commissioners Richard Day and Thomas 
Moran 



169 



SEWER COMMISSION 

In 1995 sewer installation was completed in the 
Westlands and work began around Freeman Lake. 
Approximately 780 homes in the Westlands can now 
hook up to the sewer system. In 1996, work will be 
completed around Freeman lake and will begin in the 
North Road Area and in the Rainbow Avenue Area. 

When the sewer project as envisioned in 1984 is 
completed, 7872 homes and businesses (68% of town) 
will receive municipal sewer service. The remaining 
area scheduled to be sewered include: 

Northgate Road Area 
Westford Road Area 
Hart Pond Area 
East Chelmsford 

In 1995, changes were enacted to the State's 
sanitary code (Title 5) that have forced us to look 
closely at a sewer plan for the remaining 32% of 
Chelmsford. We have been studying conditions in these 
areas of Chelmsford and have learned that: 

Of the remaining 32% unsewered areas of 
Chelmsford, roughly 56% is within the town's 
aquifer protection district. 

Chelmsford's ground water is the source for 
100% of our drinking water. 

Inadequate and failing septic systems pollute our 
ground water and threaten our drinking water 
supply. 



170 



The average trouble-free operational life of a 
Chelmsford septic system is 8 years. 

The septic system failure rate in the remaining 
32% of Chelmsford prior to the new Title 5 
revisions enacted on March 31, 1995, was 25%. 

Since March 31, 1995, the septic system failure 
rate has been 35%. 

If we had not sewered the initial 68% of 
Chelmsford, we estimate that the failure rate in 
these areas would be as high as 85%. 

The typical cost to repair a Chelmsford Septic 
System (after 3/31/95) has been between $8,000 
and $25,000. The average cost has been 
$12,000. 

The Title 5 system inspection requirement at the 
time of home sale has effectively created two 
types of property values. If two similar 
Chelmsford homes in similar residential areas of 
Chelmsford were compared, the house 
connected to a public sewer will sell faster, and 
is worth more, than the house that is not. 

If a community makes a local financial 
commitment to build sewers, the state will 
waive the Title 5 requirement for system repairs 
required as a result of a system inspection at the 
time of sale for those homes scheduled to be 
sewered. 



171 



As a result of our study, the Commission intends 
to sponsor an article at the spring 1996 town meeting to 
extend municipal sewers to the remaining 32% of 
Chelmsford. Prior to town meeting, we will also be 
sponsoring a ballot question exempting the funding 
from the limits of Proposition 2 1/2. 

If you live in the 32% of Chelmsford that is 
currently not scheduled to be sewered, you may ask 
why you should support further sewer extensions. Our 
response is as follows: 

"Would you rather spend $12,000 to repair your 
septic system, which is an up-front, lump sum 
cost, with no guarantee that the septic system 
won't fail again, or would you prefer to invest in 
sewers, which is a permanent solution, and 
whose costs can be apportioned over 20 years?" 

If you live in the 68% of Chelmsford presently 
scheduled to receive sewers, you may ask why you 
should support further sewer extensions. Our response 
is as follows: 

1 . We all drink the same water and we all need 
to share the responsibility to protect it. 

2. No one wants to see their taxes increase. We 
have developed a plan to sewer the remaining 
32%> of Chelmsford that does not increase taxes. 

3. Cost control and reducing the impact on 
taxes have been our top priority since the project 
began. To date, we have successfully insured 
that all sewer betterment assessment and 



172 



privilege fee revenues were used to retire the 
sewer debt. You have our assurance that we will 
do everything within our authority to maintain 
this policy. 

4. Those in the 32% unsewered areas must 
collectively pay $20,250,000 in taxes over the 
life of the current sewer project to pay for the 
remaining 68% of Chelmsford to be sewered. 
Please, do not turn your back on your neighbors. 
They have supported you. Now they need your 
support. 

Also in 1995, the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission and the Tyngsboro Sewer Commission 
signed a formal agreement permitting Tyngsboro to 
transmit sewerage through Chelmsford to Lowell for 
treatment. Both Commissions worked cooperatively to 
formulate and execute the agreement. 

In 1995, Chelmsford purchased 3,010,000 
gallons of sewer capacity from the City of Lowell with 
the option to re-sell part of that capacity to Tyngsboro. 
The North Chelmsford sewer system was designed and 
constructed with additional capacity to accommodate 
flows from areas in Tyngsboro west of the Merrimack 
River. 

The agreement essentially sells Tyngsboro 
350,000 gallons of sewage capacity at a cost of 
$1,650,000 to Chelmsford. The $1,650,000 includes 
both principal and interest payments for Tyngsboro's 
share of the capital costs to convey its wastewater 
through Chelmsford and treat it in Lowell. 
Chelmsford's sale of 350,000 gallons to Tyngsboro does 



173 



not leave Chelmsford with a shortfall of capacity to 
serve future needs. 

The first partial payment by Tyngsboro of 
$100,000 was received by Chelmsford shortly after the 
agreement was signed in mid-November. All payments 
received by Chelmsford from Tyngsboro will be used to 
retire Chelmsford's sewer debt and will further reduce 
the impact of the sewer project on the Chelmsford tax 
rate. 

In 1995, the Commission completed 
negotiations with developers and commercial property 
owners in the Drum Hill Area to extend municipal 
sewerage to the area. The Dingwell Street Relief 
Interceptor was constructed in 1995 opening up the 
Drum Hill Area for sewerage flow. One hundred 
percent of all costs required to sewer the Drum Hill 
Area will be assigned to the commercial and industrial 
property owners, with no costs assigned to the residents 
of Chelmsford. 

The Commission would like to acknowledge our 
support staff, Evelyn Newman and Jacqueline Sheehy 
for their hard work, professionalism and patience. Their 
multifaceted duties are shared by the Sewer Division of 
the Department of Public Works, and they are the 
individuals who interface with the public on a daily 
basis. 



174 



Respectfully Submitted 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 
John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
George F. Abely, Clerk 
Richard J. Day 
Thomas F. Moran 



175 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Members: 

Norma Eisenmann, Chairperson 

Barbara Scavezze, Solid Waste Coordinator 

Allen Beebe 

Elizabeth Mattson 

Robert McCallum 

Peter Nelson 

The Town awarded a 1 year contract to Ogden 
Martin for solid waste disposal, and a 5 year contract to 
Waste Management for the weekly collection of solid 
waste, the biweekly collection of recyclables, and 
curbside leaf collections (held once in the spring and 
twice in the fall). The recycling program expanded in 
July to include (in addition to bottles, cans and 
newspapers): plastics #1-7, aseptic containers (such as 
paper milk cartons), mixed paper, magazines, catalogs, 
phone books, and cardboard (such as cereal boxes and 
packing boxes). 

The Solid Waste Advisory Committee held a 
brush drop-off (one in the spring and one in the fall), 
and instituted a drop-off for furniture, household goods, 
and metal items (one in the spring and one in the fall). 

SWAC produced and mailed a yearly 
informational flyer to all residents. The yearly flyer 
included the recycling schedule, and detailed the proper 
methods, timing and places for disposal of various types 
of recyclable material and solid waste. This type of 
information was also prepared for inclusion in the 
Community Newsletter. SWAC also participated in the 
4th of July activities with a float which highlighted the 
new recyclable materials. 



176 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

Director: William L. Hahn 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
residents of the Town of Chelmsford, the annual report 
of activities of the Department of Veterans's Services is 
submitted. 

In accordance with Chapter 115, M.G.L., 
veterans benefits were provided to eligible needy 
veterans for FY1995 at a cost of $83,276, of which 75% 
of that amount is reimbursed to the Town by the 
Commonwealth. Monthly caseloads averaged between 
10-15 during this period. In addition, 28 federal claims 
for pensions and compensation through the US Dept. of 
Veterans Affairs were filed, resulting in awards totaling 
$12,509. 

The District Office, located in the Old Town 
Hall, Chelmsford Center, serves veterans of the Towns 
of Chelmsford and Westford. The Town of Westford 
shares 40% of the operating costs and an unpaid District 
Veterans Advisory Board represents the veterans of 
both towns. 

This office has been greatly assisted by the 
membership of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American 
Legion, DAV, Merrimack Valley Vietnam Veterans, 
Chelmsford Veterans Memorial Park Committee and 
the Chelmsford Community Exchange. In addition, the 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager have been very 
supportive of the towns' veterans. 



177 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

During the year of 1995 the committee did not 
receive any applications for assistance from Veterans of 
World War II. Applications for assistance usually 
comes from the Veterans' Agent of the Veterans' 
Benefits Department. Assistance is given in the form 
of Material Grants and no cash payments have been 
made in the past. 

The fund now totals $20,012.86. It was 
established in 1947 and may veterans of World War II 
have been helped. The fund is now approaching nearly 
fifty years of operation. Present income is derived from 
interest on bank savings and certificate accounts. 

One of our longest serving members of the 
committee, Mr. George F. Waite, resigned due to ill 
health and later in the year passed on. Mr. Waite was 
an original appointee to the committee in 1947 and 
served faithfully until 1995. He attended every meeting 
during that long span of years. We now acknowledge 
his willingness to serve for nearly fifty years. 

Present members, one from each voting 
precinct, are listed as follows: 

Precinct 1: Steven E.C. Belkakis, DDS 

Precinct 2: Carl Lebedzinski 

Precinct 3: James J. Walker 

Precinct 4: John J. McNulty 

Precinct 5: Frederick M. Reid 

Precinct 6: Alfred M. Coburn 



178 



Precinct 7: Alan E. Greehalgh 
Precinct 8: Neal C. Stanley 
Precinct 9: Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 

The committee extends it appreciation to the 
various town officials who have assisted the committee 
over past years. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFOD 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 



179 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager 

January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 



Balance on Hand as of 1/1/1995: 
Add Receipts: 



$19,220.29 



The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $438.12 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $354.45 



Total Interest Received: 
Balance on Hand as of 12/31/1995: 



$792.57 



$20,012.86 



ASSETS 



MassBank for Savings, Acct. #91 1287909 
MassBank for Savings, Acct. #922055696 
Total Assets 



$13,703.24 

$6,309.62 

$20,012.86 



LIABILITIES 



Total Liabilities 



$ None 



Total Assets, less Liabilities, as of 
December 31, 1995 



$20,012.86 



Respectfully Sumitted: 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



180 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN ELECTION APRIL 4, 1995 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
VIZ: 

Precinct 1 : 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 



181 



On Tuesday, the 4th day of April 1995 being the first 
Tuesday in said month at 8:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years; 

Two School Committee Members for three years; 

Two Public Library Trustees for three years; 

One Board of Health Member for three years; 

Two Planning Board Members for three years; 

One Planning Board Member for unexpired two 
year term; 

Two Sewer Commissioners for three years; 

One Housing Authority Member for five years; 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years; 

One Constable for three years; 

and to vote on the following question: 

QUESTION 1 

THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule 
Charter under part III, Section 3-2 (c), Board of 
Selectmen Appointment Powers such that the Board of 



182 



Selectmen shall have the power to appoint Policy 
Advisory Committees to assist their decision making 
process? 

Yes/No 

and to bring in their votes for the following: 

Fifty-four Representative Town Meeting 
members; six representatives per precinct for a three year 
term. 

Two Representative Town Meeting Members for 
an unexpired two year term in Precinct 1 . 

One Representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired two year term in Precinct 2. 

One Representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired one year term in Precinct 9. 

The polls will be open from 8:00 a.m. until 8:00 
p.m.; and will meet in the Senior Center, Groton Road, 
North Chelmsford on Monday, the twenty-fourth day of 
April, at 7:30 p.m. in the evening, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



183 



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185 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 24, 1995 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 
7:40 PM, at the Senior Citizen Center by the Moderator 
Dennis J. McHugh. The Moderator recognized the 
presence of a quorum, there were 155 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. The Moderator pointed out the 
fire exits. He went over the Town Meeting rules and 
procedures and made a few public announcements. 

The Moderator then requested a moment of silence 
in honor of two former elected officials. Selectman and 
School Committee member, Daniel Hart, who passed away 
November 14, 1994. Assessor, Housing Authority 
Chairman, and Town Meeting Representative, Ruth 
Delaney, who passed away January 25, 1995. He also 
requested because of a bombing which had taken place on 
April 19th at the Oklahoma Federal Building in Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma, a moment to remember those who died, 
and their families. 

The Moderator then asked for permission to allow 
the following non residents and/or department heads to 
address the body when articles required their input. Mary 
Mahoney, Library Director and Philip Seibert, Architect 
for the Library, Bernie Di Natale and Robert Cruickshank, 
of the School Department. Motion carried. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Robert P. 
Joyce welcomed to the meeting newly elected Town 
Meeting Representatives and Selectman Susan Gates. The 
body responded with a round of applause. 



186 



Selectman Peter Lawlor then read two 
proclamations. This week April 24th to April 28th is to be 
known as Student Government Week. The week of May 
1 st to May 5th is to known as Government Week. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

The Moderator announced that Representative 
Carol Cleven and Senator Cecile Hicks were present and 
would each give a brief report on their activities. 

Representative Carol Cleven came forward and 
gave a brief summary of two bills. One was concerning 
State aid for Education. The other was State funding for 
sewers. Now with the new title five being in effect, 
sewering will be an important factor in the future. 

Senator Cecile Hicks discussed the proposed 
Library funding and grant process being offered by the 
State. She said that Chelmsford's was in an excellent 
position for funding. She addressed briefly the Raytheon 
Company's issue concerning the requested tax breaks 
needed to maintain the Company in Massachusetts. The 
final item mentioned was an update on the State's budget. 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce, moved to waive the 
reading of the Constable's return service and the posting of 
the warrant be waived. The Motion carried unanimously, 
by a show of hands. Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved 
that the reading of the warrant be waived. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



187 



The Moderator requested that Leonard Doolan III 
come forward and present to the body a report of the 
Voting Procedural Committee, which had been appointed 
at the 1994 Spring Annual Town Meeting, under article 
16. Leonard Doolan gave his report. He explained that the 
Committee had been appointed and charged to recommend 
a solution to the present voting procedure presently being 
followed by the Town Meeting Representatives. Currently 
there is no means of accountability except through the 
present method of a roll call vote. The Committee sent 
surveys to the following surrounding cities/towns with 
representative style government: Adams, Amherst, 
Lexington, Natick, Reading, S. Hadley, Stoughton, 
Walpole, Webster, and Winchester. The results were the 
same, there was no actual method of recording individual 
votes. The voting methods used were hand counts or voice 
votes. As a result a debate took place among the 
Committee members. After a majority vote, it was 
decided that a tally card be designed and used during 
regular and special town meetings. A warrant article has 
been submitted and will be discussed and voted on at some 
point during this scheduled annual meeting. The 
Moderator asked that the body accept this report by way of 
show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 The Moderator explained 
the procedure he would follow during this article. He was 
going to read the budget figures shown in the grey area of 
the warrant book first. These are the total figures for the 
departments listed. He would then read the departments 
and their budget figures, at which time questions and 
discussions would be entertained. A final vote would be 
taken at the end, which will be the figured needed to raise 
and appropriate. 



188 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch gave a presentation 
explaining certain increases within the departmental 
budgets and why the recommendations were made. The 
total budget has an increase of 2 1/2 % with an expected 
shortfall of $90,000.00. This is due to a decrease in School 
Aid. He felt confident that the receipts were coming in at a 
good level, and would be able to close the gap by the time 
the tax rate budget certification is set in the fall. He felt 
that it is a good budget and that it reflects the progress that 
has been made over the years of maintaining a good 
quality of life for the Town. 

The Moderator began reading the figure's under 
Municipal Administration. Under the Selectmen's Budget 
a question was asked by John Wilder, concerning an 
increase. The Town Manager explained that this was due 
to the increase in personnel services. Non-union personal 
and the increase in his compensation. The Moderator 
continued to read from Town Manager through the 
Conservation Commission. John Wilder asked for an 
explanation of the increase. The Town Manager explained 
that the position of Land Use Co-ordinator has increased 
hours to become a full-time position due to the use of 
Conservation Commission and the DPW. The Moderator 
continued to read from Board of Appeals through Planning 
Board. John Wilder asked what the increase was. The 
Town Manager explained that the personnel services have 
increased from part-time position to full time at the 
Planning Board's request. The position had been cut back 
previously but now due to the requirement of more plans 
etc an increase in hours is justifiable. The Moderator 
continue reading up to the School Department. Michael 
Sockol asked for Dr. Moser to come forward and give an 
explanation. Dr Richard Moser, School Superintendent, 
went over the handout that was made available, which 



189 



explained the requested additional funding. John Wilder 
questioned the status of the Center School Project. Robert 
Cruickshank, Business Manager explained that it will be at 
least another year before State funding will be made 
available. The Moderator read the Public Safety budget 
figures. John Wilder questioned the increase in the Police 
Department's personnel budget. The Manager explained 
that this increase is due to all the dispatchers now 
appearing under the Police Department's budget. The 
Moderator continued reading from the Dog Officer 
through the Town Engineer's budget. John Wilder 
questioned the increase. The Town Manager explained 
that a clerical position had been shifted from the Sewer 
Department to the Engineer's Department. The Moderator 
continue reading to the Board of Health where the Town 
Manager moved to increase the Budget by $1,760.00 
under Personnel Services, for a total line item figure of 
$176,223. Which will reflect a total budget of $191,723. 
The Moderator continue reading under the Library budget 
through the Total Budget line item. 

The Moderator asked for the total budget figure. 
The Town Manger gave the total figure of $52,173,202. 
He then explained that at the Special Town Meeting this 
figure would be reduced by $1,150,000.00 with Sewer 
Betterment money and a $2,000.00 transfer of Wetland 
Protection Act money to the Conservation budget. 
Bernard Lynch further explained that the total budget 
figured is $54,470,272 minus the total nonappropriated 
expenses, minus the warrant articles to be voted on, and 
minus the sewer user fee offset. Barry Balan moved that 
the body accept the total budget as presented. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the figure of 
$52,173,202. motion carried, unanimously. 



190 



The budget article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $52,173,202 
to defray Town charges for the fiscal period July 1, 1995 
to June 30, 1996. 

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION 

1. Personnel Services $ 1,438,631 

2. Expense 385,298 

3. Out of State 4,500 

4. Outlay 3,200 

5. Legal Services 18.000 
TOTAL $ 1,438,631 

EDUCATION 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

6. Total Budget $ 27,703,325 
NASHOBA VALLEY TECH SCHOOL 

7. Total Budget $ 511,072 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

8. Personnel Services $ 5,526,656 

9. Expense 474,493 

10. Out of State 4,100 

11. Outlay 47.250 
TOTAL $ 6,052,499 



191 



PUBLIC WORKS 

12. Personnel Services $ 1,11 5,498 

13. Expense 2,587,595 

14. Out of State 1,500 

15. Outlay 12,500 

1 6. Snow and Ice 350.000 
TOTAL $ 4,067,093 

SEWER COMMISSION 

17. Expense $ 15,000 

18. Out of State 

TOTAL $ 17,500 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



19. Personnel Services 

20. Expense 

21. Out of State 

22. Outlay 
TOTAL 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 



23. Personnel Services $ 351,865 

24. Expense 148.018 
TOTAL $ 499,883 

LIBRARY 

25. Personnel Services $ 641,439 

26. Expense 214,332 

27. Out of State 1.500 
TOTAL $ 857,271 



192 



$ 


169,136 




14,925 




500 







$ 


184,561 



UNDISTRIBUTED EXPENSES 

28. TOTAL $ 5,392,620 
PEBT & INTEREST 

29. Principal $ 4,242,826 

30. Interest 1.889.805 
TOTAL $ 6,132,631 

GROSS OPERATING BUDGET $ 54,470,272 

Warrant Articles 364,570 

Art 21 Non Appropriations 1,248,616 

(5/8/95 - defeated) 

Sewer Offset Receipts 683,884 

R&A $ 52,173,202 

See Art 15 STM 5/4/95 Wetld. Spec Rev 2,000 

See Art 1 6 STM 5/4/95 Sewer Bents 1 , 1 50,000 

R&A $ 51,021,202 

Plus: Art 21 Non Appropriations (+) 150,000 

TOTAL R&A $ 51,171.202 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$1,100,000.00 for the following capital projects: 

DEPART. ITEM BUDGET 

FIRE Reburbish fire Truck $ 60,000 

Station roof repair 1 5,000 



193 



POLICE Cruiser replacement $ 

Police facility .plan/engin.. study 
Police facility security surveillance sys 



DATA PROCESSING 

Computer upgrades 

DPW One ton truck - sewer 

Old Town Hall repairs 
Drainage 
One ton truck 
Vehicle for highway Superintendent 



$ 



$ 



100,000 
20,000 
12,000 



30,000 

30,000 
35,000 
50,000 
30,000 
25,000 



DPW/SCHOOL SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION 

Sidewalk design & construction $ 300,000 

SCHOOL 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Cafeteria tables $ 7,000 

HVAC 28,000 

Microscopes 3 0,000 

MCCARTHY 

Cafeteria tables & chairs $ 7,000 

PARKER 

Student desks & chairs $ 20,000 

Library/computer furniture 20,000 

Intrusion alarm 1 5 ,000 

Telephone system 24,000 

HARRINGTON 

Intrusion alarm $ 15,000 



194 



WESTLANDS 

Intrusion alarm $ 15,000 

TECHNOLOGY 

Workstations $ 102,000 

Network School System 1 00,000 

MAINTENANCE 

Backflow systems $ 10,000 

TOTAL: $ 1,100,000 

and to borrow the sum of $1,100,000.00 to fund these 
obligations. 

The Town Manager explained the article. The 
Moderator asked for any questions. Hearing none, he then 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, 
the sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a Reserve Fund at 
the discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General laws Chapter 40, Section 6. 

The Town Manager explained that this is to be 
used by the Finance Committee in the need of emergency 
funds. This figure has been used for the last six years, and 
has proved adequate. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 



195 



recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$12,500.00 from the sale of the Graves and Lots to the 
Cemetery Improvement and Development Funds. 

The Town Manager explained the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $19,500.00 to engage a private accounting firm 
to prepare an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

The Town Manager explained that due to the Town 
receiving Federal Funds an audit must be done. The Town 
has a policy of annually conducting an audit of all it's 
books. The cost of the service is by comparable bid, of 
$19,500.00. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of funding the sand 
lease approved by the Town under Article 12 of the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting. 



196 



The Town Manager explained that this is the 
seventh year of a ten year lease of the land behind the 
Highway Department's garage on Richardson Road. It has 
been very beneficial to the town. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen to sell pursuant to 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
30B Police Cruisers and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000.00 from funds received from said sales towards 
the purchase of communication radios for the police 
department. 

Town Manager explained that in previous years the 
radios were kept and stripped for parts. Times have 
changed and the cost effective way is to sell these radio's 
at auction and use the funds to purchase new equipment. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the town in a certain parcel of land 
on Shore Drive, shown as lots 35 & 36 on Assessor's Map 
45, containing 6700 square feet and 4638 square feet more 
or less respectively; and more fully described in a deed 



197 



recorded in the Middlesex North district Registry of Deeds 
in Book 6258, Page 149 and Book 3041, Page 53. 

Rather then withdraw this article, The Town 
Manager requested that the article be defeated. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee supported the 
motion to defeat. The Board of Selectmen also supported 
the motion to defeat. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$40,000.00 for the purpose of paving Mallory Street to 
Town specifications and to assess betterments to the 
residents benefited by the paving of Mallory Street 
pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 80 for a percentage of the 
amount expended under this article. 

The Town Manager explained that this is a new 
program. Due to this being a public way, which is not 
accepted the Town would do the necessary work. The cost 
is $40,000.00. and the provisions must be accepted by the 
four residences on Mallory Street before any work is to be 
done The Town would pay 25% which is $10,000.00 and 
the residents pay 75%, which is $30,000.00, which will be 
divided among them and attached to their taxes as a 
betterment fee. Due to the ongoing maintenance cost of 
grading the road over the years the Town will save 
$10,000.00. Questions were asked. John Wilder wanted 
to know if this will set a precedent, and how many roads 
are like this throughout the town. The Town Manager 
explained that this is a new program and if all the residents 
on a street accept the provisions it may be used in the 
future. There are approximately fifteen streets. John 



198 



Emerson of the Sewer Commission added, that any of the 
dirt roads in the Freeman Lake area slated for sewage in 
the future will be paved after sewage is put in. The Town 
Manager explained that Mallory Street was not one of 
these roads. Discussion took place. Dennis Ready asked 
who owned the land if the road is not acceptable, the Town 
or residents? Town Counsel James Harrington came 
forward and explained that because it is a public way and a 
passable way the four landowners own the land up to the 
roadway. The Town does not own the legal title to the 
property. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. Dwight Hayward, 

Chairman of the Finance Committee said that the Board 
did support the article, however, due to the cost being 
higher than originally anticipated, the Board will not make 
any recommendation at this time. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 1 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 

moved that the Town vote to accept the following 

mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen 

and shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 

Town Engineer: 

1. BoydsLane 2. Carter Drive 

3. Adirondack Road 4. Omni Way 

5. Peders Place 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met; vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple, with 



199 



trees thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
road improvements, and to vote to raise and appropriate, 
the sum of $5.00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land 
and for paying any damages which may be awarded as a 
result of any such taking; and vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

The Town Manager explained that these are 
roadways that have gone through the Planning Board's 
subdivision process and are now in the opinion of the 
Town Engineer and Board of Selectmen ready to be 
accepted. Burton Lane which was on the original motion 
has been dropped due to legal questions at this time. The 
five mentioned with the exception of Peders Place, which 
is a new subdivision, are from old subdivisions and for one 
reason or another have not been accepted until now. He 
said that all the roads meet the Town's standards. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Leonard Doolan III, moved 
that the Town vote to adopt a means of recording the votes 
of Town Meeting Representatives on each Town Meeting 
Article. Said record will be in the form of a Town 
Meeting Representative Voting Record Card which shall 
be distributed, collected, and maintained by the Town 
Clerk. The Voting Record Card shall include precinct 
number, representative name, session and year, article 
numbers with yes, no or abstain voting boxes, and 
signature line declaring that the votes recorded are true and 
correct. 



200 



Leonard Doolan requested that a Representative 
from each table come forward and pick up enough of the 
samples of the voting card for each Representative at each 
table. Leonard Doolan then explain that this is the tally 
card/voting record that each Representative will receive 
when checking in. Each Representative is to mark their 
vote on each article. It will show a Representative's 
attendance and allow the voter's to view how a 
Representative voted. The card may stay on file for 
perhaps five years. It is a relative easy system to follow. 
The thoughts were that only actual votes be recorded and 
not the procedural votes. It would not be a mandatory 
system. Many questions were asked. Glenn Thoren 
questioned what method would be considered the legal 
vote count. The actual tally done by the Moderator or the 
count done after viewing the cards? What if there is a 
wide difference. The Committee didn't think that there 
would be a major difference. The Moderator explained 
that the actual count taken would be the official count, not 
what is recorded on the cards. Glenn Thoren asked for 
Town Counsel's opinion on what the legal ramifications 
could be. Town Counsel James Harrington said that the 
actual hand count would be the official controlling count. 
It could be questioned after viewing the cards, however the 
official count would be the one conducted by the 
Moderator at the time. Brad Emerson asked if this was to 
be a voluntary procedure. Leonard Doolan explained that 
there is nothing in the article nor is there a by-law that 
states that a official individual tally be kept. This would 
strictly be a volunteer effort. If a Representative didn't 
want to pass in a tally card that was his or her choice. 
Cheryl Warshafsky spoke in favor of the tally card for 
accountability purposes, would it be published? She also 
questioned why didn't the committee make it a mandatory 
process? Or just enforce the roll call procedure. Leonard 



201 



Doolan said that as far as publication, the records would be 
made available to whoever. Roll call votes could still be 
requested at any time, this would not eliminate them. More 
questions took place. Kathleen Fitzpatrick questioned the 
Town Clerk, Mary St.Hilaire as to how many requests had 
there been to view the previous roll call votes? Her 
response was none. How do other committee's record their 
votes. Selectman Joyce explained that different 
committee's record the individual member's votes in their 
minutes of there meeting. Dolores Blomgren questioned if 
the card had been shown to the Town Clerk, or if any input 
had been sought from her. The Town Clerk had not been 
consulted one way or the other. The Moderator asked for 
the Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen did not recommend favorable action. A 
discussion took place. Michael Sockol wanted to amend 
the article. Town Counsel, James Harrington said that his 
motion was out of order. John Coppinger didn't like the 
Committee's recommendation at all. He felt that more 
should have been done for modifying the process. He felt 
that precinct captain's should be appointed and that 
Representatives sit together in precincts. He urged that this 
article be defeated and that another article be resubmitted 
which would address force actual organization and voting 
procedures of the Representatives. Town Clerk Mary 
St.Hilaire spoke against the article. It is to loosely written 
because it is not a mandated method of recording votes. 
She felt that it could put her office in a situation if a 
Representative chooses not to return the tally card and is 
later questioned, for accountability on an article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion defeated. 



202 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 Library Trustee, Elizabeth 
McCarthy, moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
design, construction and original equipping of a new 
library facility to be constructed as an addition to the 
existing Adams Library and appurtenant town owned 
properties, and further to authorize the Board of Library 
Trustees, Board of Selectmen, and/or Town manager to 
apply for any State and/or Town Manager to apply for any 
State and/or Federal funds which might be available to 
defray all or part of the cost of the design, construction and 
original equipping of the addition to the Adams Library to 
the Adams Library and to authorize the Board of Library 
Trustees to accept and expend any such funds when 
received without further appropriation under the 
supervision of the Town Manager. 

The Town Manager explained that this article 
would allow the opportunity for the Library Trustee's to 
apply for a State grant in order to expand the Adams 
Library. This Library was last added onto thirty-five years 
ago. Satellite operations have been built up by purchasing 
adjacent properties, and other areas in Town. It is the 
second most utilized library in this region. It needs to 
expand. To create a larger space for selection, meeting 
rooms, make handicap accessible, and to meet the needs of 
the twentyfirst century in technology. Members from the 
Library Building Committee as well as the Architect of the 
proposed new Library expansion, were present for 
questions. Edward Cady asked how many personnel 
currently work at the Library, and how many new 
personnel would need to be hired. There are 22.1 full time 
employee's. Three more full time employees would be 
needed. What is the difference between an exemption and 
an over-ride. The Town Manager explained that an 
override is built into the tax base, where an exemption is 



203 



needed only for as long as it takes to pay the bond for a 
proposed project. David McLachlan questioned the 
language of the article. Bernard Lynch explained that the 
State provided the wording for the article. It was asked 
what the proposed cost for the project would be. For the 
average taxpayer if would be $50.00 for the first year in a 
ten year bond. Working it's way down to approximately 
$36.00 in the last year of the bond. The Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee's recommendation. Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, Dwight Hayward explained 
that this would allow the Trustee's to go ahead and seek 
grant money that is available. A few years ago this body 
voted an extra $950,000.00 for the School Budget. The 
Town is going to be paying $950,000.00 plus 2 1/2 % each 
year indefinitely. This project if it goes ahead at 
maximum would be approximately $800,000.00 down to 
$0.00 in a ten year period. It should be a serious 
consideration and the Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator asked for the Selectmen's recommendation. 
Selectmen Joyce said that the four who are present 
recommended favorable action. The Moderator asked for 
a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend the Traffic 
Rules and Orders Article VI. STOPPING, STANDING 
AND PARKING by adding the following: 

Section 27A All Night Parking Prohibited It shall 
be unlawful for the operator of any vehicle to park said 
vehicleon any street between the hours of midnight and 6 
A.M. of any day from December 1st to March 31st. 



204 



The Town Manager explained that this had been a 
long standing by-law and had been discontinued about 
eight years ago. The problems cited were lack of available 
parking in certain neighborhood areas of North 
Chelmsford. It was felt that perhaps once sewage went 
through, driveways could be put in where the septic 
systems had been and the parking problems would be 
eliminated. Surrounding cities and towns have parking 
bans. Plows and emergency vehicles can not get by on 
certain roads and it has been requested by the Police and 
DPW that the overnight ban be reinstated. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article. The Board 
of Selectmen did not recommend the article. Jeff Stallard 
spoke against the article. He said that this would have an 
significant impact on the village of North Chelmsford. 
There are many narrow roads and it would propose a 
hardship. Bernard Lynch said that it is because of the 
narrow roads that this is all the more reason that there be 
no parking in order to allow emergency vehicles can get 
through the streets. Tom Christiano questioned the Board 
of Selectmen on their vote on the article. Robert Joyce 
spoke against the article. Peter Lawlor said that he was the 
only Selectman in favor. He felt that safety was the main 
issue, no matter how inconvenience a parking situation is. 
Susan Gates spoke against the article. She viewed the Gay 
Street area and is aware of the lack of parking spaces 
adjacent to the properties. Roger Blomgren said that when 
the snow emergency ban is declared then use the tow 
trucks to remove any problem vehicles. Bill Dalton said 
that when he was a landlord in the area he did install a 
driveway, however, he know's first hand what the parking 
problems are. It would be hard on other landlord's who 
want to rent their property if an overnight parking ban is 



205 



put back into effect. John Emerson spoke in favor of the 
article. As a past Selectman he traveled with the drivers of 
the plows and it is a tremendous safety hazard when plows 
can not get down a blocked street. A lengthy discussion 
took place. James Pearson DPW Superintendent spoke in 
favor of the article. Many questioned the need for a full 
time ban from November till April if there is only an 
average of a few snow storms per year. Rather than create 
a hardship for people for four months, the snow 
emergency ban should be enforced. Jeffrey Stallard 
moved the question. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. He asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion defeated. 

Selectman Robert Joyce, moved to adjourn the 
meeting until Monday May 1st at 7:30 PM. The Finance 
Committee did not recommend the article. They wanted to 
continue on with the meeting. Philip Currier felt that the 
meeting should adjourn until the night of the scheduled 
Special Town Meeting of Thursday May 4th. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
adjourn, motion defeated and the meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to appoint a Harbor Master whose duties shall 
include the regulation of navigation and recreational 
boating on the Merrimack River to insure the safety of the 
boating public. The Harbor Master subject to the approval 
of the Town Manager shall be responsible for establishing 
rules and regulations and fee schedules for the use of the 
public launching ramp on Wotton Lane. The Harbor 
Master or his designee as approved by the Chief of Police 
shall police the operation of the public launching ramp and 
Merrimack River with the Town of Chelmsford and shall 



206 



collect all fees and fines as provided in the rules and 
regulations. Subject to the approval of the Town Manager, 
the Harbor Master shall be authorized to apply for any 
State and/or Federal Funds or grants which might be 
available to defray all or part of the costs of establishing or 
maintaining this position and further to authorize the 
Harbor Master, under the supervision of the Town 
Manager to accept and expend any such funds without 
further appropriation. 

Town Manager explained that the purpose of this 
article is to control the boat traffic on the Merrimack 
River. The Town would work with the City of Lowell and 
the Town of Tyngsboro. Patrols would be put into place 
that would make people abide by the rules and regulations 
established by the Commonwealth. Fee's could be 
collected at boat ramps. Due to public access regulations, 
the Town couldn't limit the public access. A fee could be 
charge pending approval from the Commonwealth. Town 
residents could be charged a different rate than 
non-residents. This would allow a mechanism for control. 
Currently people do not abide by the rules. The 
consumption of alcohol is a big factor while driving on the 
river. There have been accidents and deaths as a result of 
the abuse. Steve Hadley questioned the amount of fee to 
be charged. The Town Manager said perhaps $4.00 or 
$5.00 a launch. A discussion took place. Representatives 
spoke for and against the article. Chief Armand Caron 
spoke in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee supported the article due to public safety. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. Steve 
Hadley wanted a sticker for Town residents to be 
established. Bernard Lynch and Armand Caron agreed. 
Both expressed that this proposal will be addressed and 



207 



pursued but must be approved by the State. Susan Gates 
spoke about the Quinn bill that had just been past by 
Legislation. It is a direct result of a fatal boating accident 
that had taken place within the last few years. She felt that 
the issue is public safety and urged for passage. George 
Ripsom spoke against the article. The Moderator asked 
for any further discussion. Hearing none he asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands on the article. Motion 
carried. 

Philip Currier moved to adjourn the meeting until 

the conclusion of the Special Town Meeting, scheduled for 

7:30 PM Thursday May 4th, at the Senior Citizen Center. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

The meeting adjourned at 1 1 : 10 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



208 



WARRANT FOR 

THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 4, 1995 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the Town meeting 
representatives of said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior 
Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Thursday, 
the 4th day of May, at 7:30 p.m. o'clock in the evening, 
then and there to act upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



209 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 4, 1995 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
7:30 PM, at the Senior Citizen Center by the Moderator 
Dennis J. McHugh. The Moderator recognized the 
presence of a quorum, there were 155 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator made some public announcements. 
The Adams Library will be celebrating it's hundred year 
birthday on this Sunday May 7th from 2-4 PM., and 
invited the public to attend the celebration. 

Friday, April 28th was Student Government Day in 
the Town. He read the list of the Students and the 
positions that they participated in. They are as follows. 



State Senator 



Scott Richard 



State Representative 



Debra Sheehan 



Selectmen 



James Rines 
Erik Olsson 
Michael Harrington 
Jason Hanscom 
Melissa Eisenmann 



Board of Health 



Sewer Commission 



Matthew Gannon 
Matt Sager 
Tony Silvia 

Tom Peal 
Jessica Loyer 
Brian Mycko 



210 



Cemetery Superintendent Chris Wu 



Cemetery Commission 



Housing Authority 



Matthew Tevlin 
Mark Wahley 

Kerri Dixon 



School Committee 



Jeremy Davis 
Carolyn Bleck 
Kevin Curtin 
Lisa Gibson 



Planning Board 



Jennifer Pattison 
Rebecca Ann Morse 
Sean Scanlon 



Library Trustee 



Jonathan Quimby 
Dave Crow 



Town Accountant 



Kerri Dufresne 



Police Chief 



Danielle Demers 



Ass't Police Chief 



Tov Birke-Haveisen 



Fire Chief 



Chad McMurrer 



Ass't Fire Chief 



Nick Holleman 



Superintendent of Streets Barry Clegg 

DPW Dir./Town Engineer Koi Birke-Haveisen 



Building Inspector 



Connie Adams 



211 



Super, of Public Bldgs 



Katrina Thompson 



Superintendent of Schools James Davis 



Town Manager 



Mike Jarasitis 



Ass't Town Manager 



Lisa Azzalina 



Council on Aging Director Jennifer Andrade 



Finance Committee 



Stephen Woodbury 
Jaime Tousignant 
Bill Allen 



Town Clerk 



Jennifer Fleming 



Treasurer and Tax Collector Dave Dickieson 



Board of Assessors 



Courtney Leary 
Michael Langtagne 
Christina Tsandikos 



Land Use Coordinator 



Chris Gennell 



Recreation Coordinator 



Katie Morrison 



Data Processing 



Jeff Stander 



Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to waive the 
reading of the Constable's return service and the posting of 
the warrant be waived. The Motion carried unanimously, 
by a show of hands. Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved 
that the reading of the warrant be waived. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously by 
show of hands. 



212 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
3 OB for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town in a certain parcel of land 
on Main Street, shown as Lot 33 on Assessor's Map 194, 
containing 4850 square feet more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
district Registry of Deeds in book 787, Page 328. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
this was the old fire station building located on Main 
Street in West Chelmsford. The minimal bid would be 
$18,000. Jeff Stallard questioned if provisions would be 
made to provide storage for the groups who use the facility 
now. The Town Manager said provisions would be made. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the town in a certain parcel of land 
on Bentley Lane, shown as Lot 49 on Assessor's Map 204, 
containing 39,000 square feet more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2153, Page 301. 

The Town Manager explained that a resident was 
interested in purchasing this property from the Town. 
According to the Building Inspector the lot was left over 
from a subdivision that had been developed in 1959. At 



213 



that time the building lot requirements were 30,000 sq ft, 
therefor this is considered grandfather and is a buildable 
lot. There is a wetland issue which must be addressed prior 
to any building taking place. The lot had been assessed 
previously with a value of $7,400. Now that it's been 
deemed a buildable lot it's value is $60,000. A number of 
questions were asked. John Hickey who has been an 
resident on the street since the street was developed and is 
a abutter to the lot, questioned why after all these years is 
the lot considered buildable, even though there is a brook 
going through the property? The Town Manager 
explained that sewage will be coming into the area within 
the next three to five years. Once this happens, a septic 
system will not be required, which is part of the reasoning 
of why the lot was considered non-buildable. As for the 
brook running through the property, the wetland bylaw 
addresses the distance a building must be in order to 
comply with the bylaw. There is enough room on the 
property to build and stay within the law. Robert Troy an 
abutter who lives next to another lot that the brook runs 
through, and has no water problems now, asked what 
guarantee would the Town give him that he would not 
have a water problem even if everything is done correctly? 
Town Counsel James Harrington said that he could bring 
suit against the builder if he could prove that the problem 
was caused by the construction. Shirley Lindsey an 
abutter who's property is right next to the lot in question 
says the brook runs through the back part of her property, 
and was concerned about it flooding. During the spring 
the Brook does rise, and felt that it would all end up on her 
property. Leonard Doolan asked if the land could be sold 
but not built on? An amendment could be made 
specifying this request. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee supported the article. The Board of Selectmen 



214 



supported the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen to sell pursuant to 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
30B self propelled asphalt paving machine and 1987 Ford 
Crown Victoria automobile and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000.00 from funds received from said sales towards 
the purchase of a hydraulic catch basin cleaner for a 
Department of Public Works truck. 

The Town Manager explained the article. The 
Finance Committee supported the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, for the property located in the town of 
Chelmsford Massachusetts and further described and 
shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of Sidewalk 
Easements, Pilgrim Road, Chelmsford, Ma prepared for 
the Town of Chelmsford, April 1995." by Town of 
Chelmsford Engineering Division, and "Plan of Sidewalk 
Easements Old Westford Road, Chelmsford, Ma prepared 
for the Town of Chelmsford, April 1995," by Town of 
Chelmsford, Engineering Division, said plans to be 
presented at Town Meeting, for the purpose of 
constructing and maintaining sidewalks and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 



215 



The Town Manager explained that this was an 
annual article regarding the sidewalk project. Its funding 
is in the Capital Improvement article. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Peter Dulchinos moved to 
dismiss this article. The Town Manager explained that the 
Attorney representing the land owner requested that the 
article be dismissed. The Finance Committee supported 
the motion to dismiss. The Board of Selectmen supported 
the motion to dismiss. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. A portion of the article appears 
below: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing town of 
Chelmsford Zoning Map by changing the following 
described property from a Special Industrial District (IS) 
to a Single Family Residential District (RB): 

The land of Oak Hill Road, Chelmsford, containing 
48.6 acres and further described as follows: 

Legal Description of Proposed Re-Zoning of 
Property Adjacent to Oak Hill Road, Chelmsford 

A certain parcel of land situated in Chelmsford and 
being shown with a plan entitled "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan of Land" Oak Hill Road, prepared for Altid 
Enterprises Limited Partnership, dated October 12, 1994 
prepared by LandYTech Consultant, Inc. and bounded and 
described as follows: 



216 



(note: SEE ACTUAL WARRANT ARTICLE ON 
FILE IN TOWN CLERK'S OFFICE, TOWN 
MEETING RECORDS FOR DESCRIPTION). 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend the vote 
passed under Article 3 at the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, 
authorizing the borrowing of $6,093,399 for the Center 
School renovation project, by adding the following clause: 
"provided that the Town may incur debt for planning and 
other preliminary expenses at any time after the Town's 
application for a state construction grant has been included 
by the State Department of Education on its published list 
of project applications, showing the priority assigned to 
the project." 

The Town Manager explained that the language 
that had been inserted into the article last year has 
restricted the process for submitting the necessary plans 
for obtaining funding. Bond Counsel has advised that the 
article be submitted as stated in article. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. A 2/3's vote is 
required. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend the vote 
passed under Article 16 at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting 
authorizing the borrowing of $281,254. for the library land 
acquisition, and to rescind the balance of the authorized 
but unissued debt in the amount of $1 19,998. 



217 



The Town Manager explained the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. This article 
requires a 2/3 's vote. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer the following 
sums within the fiscal year 1995 budget. 

1 . Line Item 28. Undistributed Expenses to be 
reduced by $209,700. 

2. Line Item 30. Interest to be reduced by $90,300. 

3. Line Item 8. Public Safety Salaries to be increased 
by $290,000. 

4. Line Item 19. Cemetery Salary to be increased by 
$5,000. 

5. Line Item 23. Community Service Salary to be 
increased by $5,000. 

The Town Manager explained that this was a 
modification to the FY95 budget. Monies will be 
transferred from surplus funds in budgets to be used in the 
budgets who need the money. Glenn Thoren questioned if 
these figures had been available prior to this meeting? 
Bernard Lynch said that they were at the forum he held 
two weeks ago. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws 
Article VII MISCELLANEOUS by adding the following: 



218 



Section 13 Licensing of Fortune Tellers 

1. No person shall tell fortunes for money unless a 
license therefore has been granted by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

2. Licenses shall be granted only to applicants who 
have resided continuously in the Town for at least 
twelve months immediately proceeding the date of 
the application. 

3. Licenses issued under this section may not be 
transferred or assigned. 

4. The fee for each license granted under this section 
shall be fifty dollars. 

5. Violation of this By-Law shall be punishable by a 
fine of $100.00 for each offense. Each day that 
such violation continues shall constitute a separate 
offense. 

Lieutenant Francis Roark from the Police 
Department came forward and explained the purpose of 
the article. There has been problems in the past with 
elderly people being taken advantage of. In order to be 
able to enforce a By-Law has to be on the books. David 
McLachlan questioned the reasoning. Lieutenant Roark 
said that the main purpose was to be able to enforce a 
twelve month residency requirement prior to receiving a 
license. Susan Gates asked wasn't it easier to prove a 
person guilty of not having a license rather then 
committing fraud? Lieutenant Roark said exactly. The 
Police would be able to enforce the By-Law if there was 
no 



219 



license. The Finance Committee supported the article. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Dennis Ready moved that 
the reading of the article be waived. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
the motion. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. Lieutenant Roark explained that the main 
purpose of this By-Law was to be able to enforce control 
and monitoring of the selling of jewelry to second hand 
dealers in precious and or old metals. By having the 
requirement of a license the licensee will be subject to 
abiding to all the provisions of the By-Law. Edward Cady 
questioned the need for this type of By-Law. Lieutenant 
Roark explained that due to the amount of housebreaks in 
the area, the requirement of lists being made available will 
enable the Police to identify stolen items. A number of 
Representatives asked questions concerning the fee, the 
lack of co-operation if any from shop owners, and the 
procedure required. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. Dwight Hayward, 
Chairman of the Finance Committee said that they didn't 
want to make any recommendation on the article. The 
Selectman recommended the article. A lengthy discussion 
took place. Edward Cady felt that this would impose a 
hardship on the shop owners. Barbara Ward questioned if 
this would include antique or jewelry store owners where 
they deal in estate jewelry? These stores would also be 
required to be licensed. More discussion took place. 
James Good moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands. This left the Chair 
in doubt. The following tellers came forward, Lucy 
Simonian, Patricia Plank, Dorothy Frawley, John Maleski. 
The Moderator attempted a show of hands once again, 



220 



motion carried to stop debate. He asked for a show of 
hands on the article, which left the Chair in doubt. He 
asked the tellers to take a hand count. The result of the 
hand count was: Yes 73 No 65, motion carried. The article 
reads as follows: 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce, moved that the Town 
will vote to amend the General By-laws Article VI Police 
Regulations by adding the following: 

Section 24 Licensing and Regulation of 
Second Hand Precious Metal Shopkeepers 

1. The Board of Selectmen may, upon petition, 
license such person as they deem suitable to be 
second hand dealers in precious and/or old metals 
and keepers of shops for the purchase, sale or 
barter of such article, pursuant to the law within the 
Town. Such licenses shall be valid to protect the 
holders thereof in a building or place other than 
that designated in the license, unless consent to 
removal is granted by the Board of Selectmen. All 
licenses thus granted shall contain a clause that the 
person thus licensed agrees to abide by and be 
subject to all the provisions of this By-Law or any 
By-Law which may be adopted by the Board of 
Selectmen relating to dealers in or keepers of shops 
licensed for the above purposes. 

2. Applications for such licenses shall be examined 
and reported upon by the Chief of Police or his 
designee (s). The Chief of Police shall report 
whether or not he is of good reputation, can read 
and write the English language intelligibly, (but 
inability to do so shall be grounds for denial of said 



221 



license) has ever held a similar license and if such 
license was revoked, suspended or surrendered, the 
reason therefore. 

3. Applications for new licenses under this By-Law 
may be filed at any time. Applications for the 
reissue of licenses already existing should be filed 
at least thirty days before the expiration of such 
license. All licenses issued under the By-Law shall 
expire annually on the first day of May except that 
licenses may be issued in April to be valid for 
twelve months beginning the next succeeding first 
day of May. Persons whose licenses have expired 
and have not been reissued will be liable to 
prosecution for engaging in any business for which 
the license is required. 

4. When a licensee has failed to use his license for a 
period of thirty days in the business and at the 
place for which he was licensed, the Chief of 
Police through his designee will so report with 
such reasons for the failure as the licensee may 
give. 

5. As used in this By-Law, precious metals shall 
mean any object constructed of or electroplated 
with Gold, Silver, or Platinum, regardless of its 
form, weight or appearance. 

6. Every such shopkeeper shall keep a book in which 
shall be written, at the time of every purchase of 
any such article, a particular description thereof 
and the name, date of birth, and residence of the 
person from whom, and the day and hour when, 
such purchase was made. The shopkeeper shall 



222 



also require positive (picture) identification to 
confirm that the above information is accurate. The 
shop of such shopkeeper, and all articles of 
merchandise therein, and such book shall at all 
times during business hours be open to inspection 
of the Board of Selectmen, Police Officer of the 
Town or any persons authorized by the Board. 

Every such shopkeeper shall require a person from 
whom he makes a purchase to provide positive 
identification (positive identification shall mean 
any picture identification card issued by a 
governmental agency) and to sign his name, date of 
birth, and address on a card, the style and size of 
which shall be approved by the Police Department. 
In those transactions where precious metals and/or 
gems, regardless of form, weight or appearance, are 
purchased, said positive identification together 
with the items of precious metal and/or gems and 
each transaction sheet shall be photocopied. In the 
event that such person is unable to write, the 
shopkeeper shall fill in the name, date of birth and 
address obtained from the positive identification 
required above on such card, together with a 
notation stating that such person was unable to do 
so. 

Such card shall be retained permanently in an 
alphabetical index filed by the licensed shopkeeper 
in precious and/or old metals. Every such 
shopkeeper shall, at the time of making any 
purchases, attach a number to EACH article 
bought, traded or bartered and shall make entry of 
such number in the book described above. 



223 



If the articles obtained by the second hand precious 
and/or old metal shopkeeper through purchase, 
trade, or barter are of precious metals or gems, the 
shopkeeper shall also list in said book as described 
above and on said card as described above, the 
weight and current market value of each article 
obtained. 

7. Any Police Officer of the town, as a designee of 

the Board of Selectmen, may, during business 
hours, enter upon any premises used by a licensed 
second hand precious and/or old metals shopkeeper 
to ascertain how he conducts his business, and 
examine any and all article taken in trade or kept or 
stored in or upon said premises and all books and 
inventories relating thereto, and all such article, 
books and inventories shall be exhibited to any 
such Officer whenever a demand shall be made for 
such exhibition. Refusal to permit said viewing 
shall constitute a violation of this By-Law. The 
Officers actions shall at all times conform to the 
established Policy and Procedures of the 
Chelmsford Police Department pertaining to 
inspections of licensed premises. 

Such book shall be of a size and style to be 
approved by the Chelmsford Police Department, 
shall be legibly written in the English language, 
and shall show the amount paid for each article and 
the number attached to each article in accordance 
with the above requirements. No entry in such 
book shall be erased, obliterated or defaced. 



224 



Every such shopkeeper shall make out and deliver 
to the commanding officer of the Bureau of 
Investigative Services, Chelmsford Police 
Department, every business day before the hour of 
10 o'clock A.M. a legible and correct list 
containing an accurate and detailed description of 
all articles purchased during the preceding business 
day, the respective numbers of such articles as 
required above, the prices paid therefore, and the 
time when such articles were purchased, and with 
regards to the purchase of items containing 
precious metal, and/or gems, either the original 
photocopy or a copy thereof which shows the 
positive identification legibly, the items purchased 
and the transaction sheet, as described above. 

The Commanding Officer of the Bureau of 
Investigative Services will designate an Officer of 
his command who will review each Police report 
received listing lost/stolen property and also ensure 
that a report is received from all precious and/or 
old metals shopkeepers for the purpose of 
identifying any article that is like or similar to one 
which has been reported lost or stolen. Should 
this situation occur, a "stop order" shall be issued 
by the Chief of Police or his designee, to the 
shopkeeper prohibiting the resale of the particular 
article (s) until it can be determined whether the 
particular piece (s) is in fact that which has been 
reported lost/stolen. If it is determined that the 
particular article is not reported lost/stolen, then the 
"stop order" shall be lifted forthwith. 



225 



8. Every such shopkeeper shall post in a conspicuous 
place in his shop a copy of the By-Laws relating to 
dealers in precious and/or old metals, to be 
furnished by the Police Department, and shall put 
in some suitable and conspicuous place on his shop 
a sign having his name and occupation legibly 
inscribed thereon in large letters. 

No such shopkeeper shall have his shop open for 
the transaction of business, nor shall he purchase 
any precious and/or old metals, except between 
sunrise and 9 o'clock in the evening of any week 
day except Saturday, on which day such shop may 
be kept open and such articles purchased from 
sunrise until 10 o'clock in the evening. 

9. No person licensed under this By-Law shall, 
directly or indirectly, either purchase or 
receive by way of barter or exchange any precious 
and/or old metals or gems from a minor, or 
apprentice knowing or having reasonable cause to 
believe him to be such. 

No such shopkeeper holding a license as a dealer in 
precious and/or old metals or gems, shall permit to 
be sold any article purchased or receive by him 
until at least a period of thirty days from the date of 
its purchase or receipt has elapsed. 

10. Any person who acts as a dealer in or keeper of a 
shop for the purchase, sale, or barter of precious 
and/or old metals without a license, or in any other 
place or manner than that designated in his license 
or after notice to him that his license has been 



226 



revoked, or violates any such rule, regulation or 
restriction of this By-Law, shall forfeit two 
hundred dollars for each such violation. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate $14,355. from the sale of Land Special 
Revenue Account for the purpose of purchasing 
playground equipment for Roberts Field under the 
supervision of the Town Manager as recommended by the 
Friends of the Park. 

The Town Manager explained that this would be a 
joint effort by volunteers to replace existing playground 
equipment at the Roberts Field playground for a total cost 
of $70,000. There has been $40,000 raised already by the 
volunteers. He wanted to transfer the money from the sale 
of town owned land account to the project which will 
allow the project to be completed within the next six 
months. Jeffrey Stallard questioned what the maintenance 
costs would be within a five year period? The Town 
Manager thought $1,000. The Town would go out on 
competitive bid for replacements. Christopher Garrahan 
requested that more equipment be provided for the Varney 
Playground. The Town Manager agreed that there is a 
need there and other area's in Town, East Chelmsford 
Field and the Mill Road Field all have requested 
equipment. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. The Board of Selectmen are in favor of the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire in fee simple the land together with 



227 



any appurtenant rights or easements along with the 
buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent domain, 
or otherwise, for the property known as the Apple Country 
Club located at 66 Park Road in the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts; shown as lot 16 on Assessor's Map 164, 
containing 31.50 acres more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2399 Page 194; and 
shown as lot 18 on Assessor's Map 164, containing 9148 
square feet more or less and more fully described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 2399 Page 194; and shown as lot 19 on 
Assessor's Map 164, containing 3,950 acres more or less 
and more fully described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 5602 
Page 134; and move that the Town vote to borrow the sum 
of $1,250,000 to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land 
and for a paying any damages which may be awarded as a 
result of any such taking. 

Selectman Robert Joyce said that the entire Board 
of Selectman supported the article. He had provided a 
slide presentation that showed the area. Selectman Peter 
Lawlor made a verbal presentation to the Body. He 
addressed the issues concerning the reasoning and cost of 
obtaining this track of land. It is a one time opportunity 
for the Town. In order to keep the land undeveloped the 
Town must take the land by eminent domain. The assessed 
value is $1,700,000. The Town allowed the current owners 
to pay on an assessed value rate of $1,1,000.00 provided 
that they keep the land as recreational use. The Board had 
the land appraised, the figure is $1,250,000. It will take 
out a ten year bond which will cost $166,000. per year and 
remain a golf course that would be town owned. If no 



228 



action is taken then the land will be sold to a developer. 
The total land in question could be subdivided into 
twenty-eight house lots. The Town Manager came 
forward and gave a financial analyst. This covered the 
debt, operation and lost tax revenue. Total Operational 
cost per year would be $210,000. The total lost in tax 
revenue if twenty-eight homes were to be developed 
would be $165,000. per year. The yearly estimated 
revenue is $346,000., which includes plans for a possible 
added driving range and increase the fees. Most 
importantly there will be the protection of open space. If 
the proposed twenty-eight homes are built the potential 
costs with 1.5 students per home is $223,400. He listed 
six other municipal owned courses and their revenue and 
expenses. The Moderator asked for questions. Karen 
Ready wanted to know if this site would be available for 
the annual winterfest activities? Yes it would be used in 
the winter and the recreation commission would take 
advantage of it during the rest of the year. Robert Hayes 
Chairman of the Recreation Commission stated that the 
Recreation Commission was in full support of this article 
and urged for the body to pass the article. A number of 
Representatives asked questions concerning the eminent 
domain process, the possibility of re-selling it in the 
future. The Manager said that the cost would be $14.00 
per year on a home assessed at $177,000. The Finance 
Committee supported the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. Joseph Shanahan who 
represented clients whose interests were in the 
development of the land. He had the land appraised and 
based on the proposed development of twenty-eight lots 
the value is $1,800,000. If the Town wanted to amend the 
article to read up to $1,530,000. his clients would sell the 
land and thus avoid a land damage claim. James 
Harrington, Town Counsel said that the Town's figure of 



229 



$1,250,000 was a good and fair price. It's based on the 
current conditioned of the land, not what could happen in 
the future if developed. George Ripsom spoke in favor of 
the article. He reminded the Representatives about the 
Roberts Field property that the Town purchased over 
twenty years ago, and what the alternative results could 
have been if a development went in. Henrick Johnson 
moved the question to stop debate. Motion carried, 
unanimously, by a show of hands. The Moderator asked 
for a vote on the motion by a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Michael Sockol moved to adjourn the meeting due 
to the lateness of the hour. The Moderator explained that 
the next two articles were going to be withdrawn and there 
were only a few more article to act upon. He requested that 
the business of the Special meeting be completed then a 
motion to adjourn be made. Michael Sockol withdrew his 
motion to adjourn. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Wendy Marcks, Chairman 
of the School Committee moved to withdraw this article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the withdrawal. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the motion to 
withdraw. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

The article read as follows: 

Chairman of the School Committee Wendy Marcks 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws 
Article VII MISCELLANEOUS by adding the following: 

Section 14 Town of Chelmsford Education Fund 



230 



A. PURPOSE 

The Town of Chelmsford Education Fund is 
established in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. 
Chapter 60, Section 3C as amended by the Acts of 1993 to 
provide supplemental educational funding for local 
educational needs. 

B. DEFINITIONS 

1. Local educational needs shall be defined as the 
needs of those schools and students which are 
under the jurisdiction of the Local Education 
Agency (LEA) which is the Chelmsford Public 
Schools. 

2. Supplemental educational funding shall be defined 
as that which adds to or enhances the educational 
opportunities provided by the Local Educational 
Agency and funded by the Town of Chelmsford. 
Supplemental funding cannot 

a) take the place of funds requested in the 
Chelmsford School Committee's annual budget 
request which support the essential curriculum and 
programs of the Chelmsford Public Schools; 

b) create new ongoing programs which cannot be 
supported in the future by the Chelmsford Public 
Schools; or 

c) provide for the continuation of programs which 
the Chelmsford Public Schools no longer support. 



231 



C. THE CHELMSFORD EDUCATION FUND 
COMMITTEE 

1 . There shall be established a Chelmsford Education 
Fund Committee to administer the Chelmsford 
Education fund and to authorize the expenditure of 
its funds. 

2. Members of the Chelmsford Education Fund 
Committee shall be the Superintendent of Schools 
and five residents of the Town, appointed by the 
Selectmen. 

3. Appointment of three year terms will be made in 
accordance with the statute. Upon initial formation 
of the Committee, terms of members will be 
arranged so that the terms of as nearly an equal 
number of members as is possible shall expire each 
year. 

D. MEETINGS 

1. The Chelmsford Education Fund Committee shall 
meet quarterly and at other times as are deemed 
necessary and appropriate for the conduct of 
Committee business. 

2. A quorum for purpose of transacting business shall 
consist of four members, decisions shall be based 
upon the vote of a majority of the members 
present. 

3. The Town Treasurer shall provide the Committee 
with quarterly financial reports on the status of the 
Chelmsford Education Fund. 



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E. PROCEDURES 

1 . Written proposals requesting supplemental funding 
from the Chelmsford Education Fund shall be 
submitted to the Chelmsford Education Fund 
Committee at least two weeks before a meeting and 
shall be presented according to the format specified 
by the committee. 

2. Application for such funds may be made by the 
Chelmsford School Committee through the 
Superintendent of Schools, by a School Council (as 
established under M.G.L. Chapter 71, Section 59C) 
by members of the professional staff employed by 
the Chelmsford Public Schools. 

3. All requests for supplemental funding must support 
the mission and beliefs of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools and be in accordance with Chelmsford 
School Committee policy. 

Section 15 TOWN OF CHELMSFORD SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND 

Prior to establishing a Scholarship Fund pursuant 
to M.G.L. Chapter 60, Section 3C the Town shall adopt a 
comprehensive By-Law governing its administration. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Wendy Marcks, Chairman 
of the School Committee moved to withdraw this article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the withdrawal. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the motion to 
withdraw. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 



233 



The article read as follows: 

Chairman of the School Committee Wendy Marcks 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 60, Section 3C as 
amended by the Acts of 1993 relative to providing for 
financial aid donations accompanying municipal or motor 
vehicle excise tax payments. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer $2,000.00 
from Conservation fees under Wetlands Special Reserve 
Fund to reduce the Conservation Commission Budget 
Fiscal Year 1996. 

The Town Manager explain the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer $1,150,000. 
from Sewer Betterments, Special Revenue, to reduce the 
exempt portion of debt and interest in the Fiscal Year 1996 
Budget. 

The Town Manager explain the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 



234 



Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
Michael Sockol moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 
10:50 PM. The Moderator reconvened the Annual Town 
Meeting. Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to adjourn 
the annual meeting until Monday, May 8th to the Senior 
Citizen Center on Groton Road. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to adjourn, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Meeting adjourned at 10:55 PM 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



235 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 8, 1995 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called 
to order at 7:30 PM, at the Senior Citizen Center by the 
Moderator Dennis J. McHugh. The Moderator recognized 
the presence of a quorum, there were 132 Town Meeting 
Representatives present. 

The Moderator asked that the Town Meeting Body 
have an moment of silence in honor of the fifty year V E 
Day celebrations that were going on all over the world. 
He asked that the body remember those who served and 
those who gave their lives. He thanked the body, and the 
meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Dennis Ready moved that 
the Town vote that the Town Manager under reports of the 
Town Officers and Committee shall give a brief report on 
the outcome or status of each article passed by Town 
Meeting at an Annual or Special meeting held ten or more 
months prior. The Manager will not be required to report 
on zoning or budget articles. 

Dennis Ready explained that this would require 
that the Town Manager give a brief report on the articles 
that were past at the previous year's meeting. It should be 
brief, perhaps no longer than five to ten minutes, and it 
would be given under article 1, which is where all the 
reports if any are given. 

He asked that the Town Manager come forward 
and give a quick report on the Senior Citizen rebate tax 
program. Bernard Lynch explained that this is a yearly 
article. It will be addressed under article 20 on this 



236 



warrant. It allows a one chance time for Senior Citizens to 
do a hundred hours of volunteer work and once completed 
receive a credit towards their tax bill. Chelmsford has 
been chosen as a model town with this project. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the reading of this article be waived. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Town Counsel James Harrington, explained that the Town 
Clerk had requested this article in order to simplify the 
tracking of the write-in votes during the annual Town 
elections. At times, names are written in as candidates 
under the write-in section on a Town ballot. A record 
must be kept and in the event of an opening, if the next 
person in line is tied in votes with another person then the 
remaining representatives must meet and break the tie. By 
having a rule that only those names that receive ten votes 
will be considered actual candidates, and appear on the 
reserve list. It will end any confusion. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under 
Part II Legislative Branch/Representative Town Meeting, 
Section 2.5(d) Filing Vacancies by deleting the following: 
(d) Filling Vacancies 



237 



Any vacancy in the full number of town meeting 
members from any precinct shall be filled by the person 
receiving the highest number of votes among the defeated 
candidates at the last election. In the absence of such 
candidate, the vacancy shall be filled until the next annual 
town election by the remaining town meeting members 
from the precinct, from among the voters in said precinct, 
(d) Filling Vacancies. 

Any vacancy in the full number of town meeting 
members from any precinct shall be filled by the person 
receiving the highest number of votes among the defeated 
candidates at the last election. In order to be eligible to fill 
a vacancy as a defeated candidate a write-in Candidate 
shall have received at least TEN (10) votes in the most 
recent election. In the absence of such candidate, the 
vacancy shall be filled until the next annual town election 
by the remaining town meeting members from the 
precinct, from among the voters in said precinct. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Christopher Garrahan of the 
Conservation Commission moved that the reading of this 
article be waived. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. Christopher Garrahan 
addressed the body. He explained that this was basically 
the same bylaw that is presently on the books. It was felt 
that the wording in certain areas needed to be user 
friendly, or clarified slightly more. It would be easier to 
understand, and he asked for support on the article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



238 



The article reads as follows: 

Christopher Garrahan of the Conservation 
Commission moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article XI General Wetlands By-Law by 
deleting the existing Article XI in its entirety and replacing 
it with the following article XI: 

ARTICLE XI 
GENERAL WETLANDS BYLAW 

S E CT ION 1 PURPOSE 

The purpose of this Bylaw is to protect the 
wetlands of the Town of Chelmsford by controlling 
activities deemed to have a significant effect upon wetland 
values, including but not limited to the following: public 
or private water supply, groundwater supply, flood control, 
erosion control, storm damage prevention, water pollution 
prevention, fisheries, shellfish, wildlife, recreation and 
aesthetics (collectively, the "interests protected by this 
Bylaw"). 

SECTION 2 JURISDICTION 

Except as permitted by the Conservation 
Commission or as provided in this Bylaw, no person shall 
commence to remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, 
discharge into, or otherwise alter the following resource 
areas: any freshwater wetlands; marshes; wet meadows; 
bogs; swamps; vernal pools; banks; reservoirs; lakes; 
ponds of any size; rivers; streams; creeks; beaches; lands 
under water bodies; or lands within 100' of the aforesaid 
resource areas; lands within the 100 year floodplain, either 



239 



calculated or mapped; (collectively the "areas subject to 
protection by this bylaw"). Said resource areas shall be 
protected whether or not they border surface waters. 

SECTION 3 PROVISIONS 

The construction of any building, as defined herein 
on any lot having an area of 40,000 square feet or more, or 
any parking lot containing 10 or more parking spaces, 
shall be prohibited within 50 feet of any resource area. 

Construction of a building shall not include any 
reconstruction, alteration, extension or structural change to 
a building existing on October 15, 1990. 

The Commission shall be prohibited from issuing a 
permit for any parcel where at least eighty (80) percent of 
the lot area required by the Zoning By-Law Section 2600 
Intensity of Use Schedule, Minimum Lot Requirements, is 
not contiguous land other than that under any water body 
or bog, swamp, wet meadow, marsh, or any other wetland 
as defined in MGL Chapter 131 Section 40; 

If any provision of this bylaw shall be determined 
to be invalid, the validity of the remaining portion of the 
bylaw shall not be affected thereby. The commission may 
waive the 50 feet construction prohibition contained herein 
where the Commission specifically finds that literal 
enforcement of the prohibition would involve substantial 
hardship, financial or otherwise to an applicant and that 
desirable relief may be granted without substantial 
detriment to the public good and without nullifying or 
substantially derogating from the intent or purpose of this 
By-Law. 



240 



SECTION 4 CONDITIONAL EXEMPTIONS 

This bylaw shall not apply to the following types 
of projects: 

A. Work required for the maintenance, repair or 
replacement, but not the substantial changing or 
enlarging, of an existing and lawfully located 
structure or facility used in the service of the public 
and used to provide electric, gas, water, telephone, 
telegraph and other telecommunications services; 

B. Emergency Projects as defined in MGL Ch. 131, s. 
40 which are necessary for the protection of the 
health and safety of the citizens of the 
Commonwealth and to be performed or ordered to 
be performed by an agency of the Commonwealth 
or of the Town. An emergency project may be any 
project certified to be an emergency by the 
Commission or its authorized agent. 

C. Work performed for normal maintenance or 
improvement of lands in agricultural use at the 
time the work occurs. 

SECTION 5 DETERMINATION OF APPLICABILITY 

Any person may request the Conservation 
Commission to make a determination as to whether or not 
this Bylaw applies to a particular area of land. 

This request shall be sent by certified mail or hand 
delivered to the Commission or its authorized 
representative. If the applicant is other than the owner, the 



241 



applicant shall send a copy of the request to the owner. If 
the applicant hand delivers the request to the Commission, 
he/she shall be given a dated receipt. 

The Commission shall determine, within 21 days 
of receipt of such request, whether this Bylaw does apply 
to the particular area of land. The Commission will send 
to the applicant a Determination of Applicability. 

The Determination of Applicability will be sent to 
the applicant by certified mail. If the applicant is other 
than the owner, the Commission will send a copy of the 
Determination to the owner by certified mail. 

SECTION 6 NOTICE OF INTENT 

If the particular area of land is subject to this 
Bylaw, then the applicant must file a Notice of Intent. 
This Notice will be on a form available from the 
Commission. Said Notice shall include plans and 
specifications as required of an applicant under G.L., Ch. 
131, Section 40, as of July 28, 1978 and as amended, and 
such other information as the Commission may require. 
These plans will clearly show the location of wetland 
boundaries and numbered wetlands flags. Said numbered 
flags shall correspond to flags in the field. 

The Notice of Intent may be filed before other 
permits, variances and approvals required under other 
Town Bylaws, Subdivision Control Law or regulations 
have been obtained. 



242 



The Notice of Intent shall be accompanied by a 
check for the amount of the filing fee (see Filing Fees). 
No filing fee is required when the Town of Chelmsford 
files a Notice of Intent. 

Each Notice of Intent shall be sent by certified 
mail or shall be hand delivered to the Conservation 
Commission or its authorized representative. A person 
delivering a Notice of Intent by hand shall be given a dated 
receipt. 

Notice of the public hearing shall be sent by the 
applicant by certified mail to all parties in interest. Parties 
in interest shall mean the petitioner, abutters, owners of 
land directly opposite on any public or private street or 
way, and abutters to abutters within 300 feet of the 
property line of the petitioner or the boundary of the 
wetland area under consideration, whichever is greater all 
as they appear on the most recent applicable tax list, not 
withstanding that the land of any such owner is located in 
another city or town. 

SECTION 7 PUBLIC HEARING 

The Commission shall hold a public hearing on the 
application within 21 days of the filing of the Notice of 
Intent. Notice of the date, time and place of the hearing 
shall be given by the Commission, at the expense of the 
applicant, not less than five days prior to the hearing, by 
publication in a newspaper of general circulation in 
Chelmsford and by mailing a notice to the applicant, the 
Board of Health, Board of Appeals and Planning Board. 
Such hearing may be held at the same time and place as 
any public hearing required to be held under G.L., Ch. 
131, Section 40. If the Commission determines that 



243 



additional data or information is necessary, the hearing 
may be" continued to a future date. 

SECTION 8 BURDEN OF PROOF 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by 
preponderance of the credible evidence that the work 
proposed in the application will not harm the interests 
protected by this Bylaw. Failure to provide adequate 
evidence to the Commission supporting a determination 
that the proposed work will not harm the interests 
protected by this Bylaw shall be sufficient cause for the 
Commission to deny a permit or grant a permit with 
conditions, or, in the Commission's discretion, to continue 
the hearing to another date to enable the applicant or 
others to present additional evidence upon such terms and 
conditions as seems to the Commission to be reasonable. 

SECTION 9 ORDER OF CONDITIONS 

If after said hearing, the Conservation Commission 
determines that the land on which the proposed work is to 
be done is significant to the interests protected by this 
Bylaw, it shall, by written order, within 21 days or such 
further time as the Commission and applicant shall agree 
upon, impose such conditions reasonably necessary for the 
protection of interests described herein and all work shall 
be done in accordance therewith. The Conservation 
Commission may impose such conditions on any proposed 
removing, dredging, filling or altering as it deems 
necessary to protect and preserve the interests covered by 
this Bylaw. Such Order of Conditions shall be in writing 
and may be subject to the same constraints as any such 
order issued by the Chelmsford Conservation Commission 
under the provisions of G.L. 131, Section 40, or successor 



244 



statutes, and shall be issued within 21 days after the Public 
Hearing. Such Order of Conditions shall expire 3 years 
from the date of issuance. The Conservation Commission 
may extend an Order of Conditions for one or more 
periods of up to three years each. The request for an 
extension shall be made to the Conservation Commission 
in writing at least thirty (30) days prior to expiration of the 
Order of Conditions. The Commission may deny the 
request for an extension and require the filing of a new 
Notice of Intent for the remaining work. No proposed 
work governed by an Order of Conditions shall be 
undertaken until all permits, approvals, and variances 
required by the local Bylaw have been obtained and all 
applicable appeal periods have expired. 

If the Commission determines that the area which 
is the subject of the application is not significant to the 
interests protected by this Bylaw, or that the proposed 
activity does not require the imposition of conditions, it 
shall issue a permit without conditions within 21 days of 
the public hearing. The applicant and all others who have 
received notice of such hearing by mail shall be notified of 
such determination within 21 days after said hearing. 

SECTION 10 DENIAL 

The Commission is empowered to deny permission 
for any removal, dredging, filling, or altering, on subject 
lands within the Town, if, in its judgment such denial is 
necessary to protect the interest of this Bylaw. 



245 



SECTION 1 1 RELATIONSHIP TO CHAPTER 131. 
SECTION 40 AND 3 1 OCMR 

The Commission shall not impose additional or 
more stringent conditions pursuant to Chapter 131, Section 
40 of the General Laws than it imposes pursuant to this 
Bylaw, nor shall it require a Notice of Intent pursuant to 
Ch. 131, Section 40 to provide materials or data in 
addition to those required pursuant to this Bylaw. All 
reference in the bylaw to Chapter 131, Section 40 shall 
include the provisions of regulations promulgated pursuant 
to said statute as codified in 31 OCMR 10.00. 

SECTION 12 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

At any time up to the closing of the hearing, the 
Commission may require such additional information from 
the applicant as the Commission reasonably deems 
necessary. 

SECTION 13 ENTRY UPON LAND 

The Commission, its agents, and employees may 
enter upon privately-owned land for the purpose of 
performing their duties under this Bylaw. 

SECTION 14 RECORDING 

Both the original Order of Conditions and a 
statement of compliance with this order shall be recorded 
with the Registry of Deeds in Lowell for the property 
defined in the order. Evidence certifying that recording 
has been done must be returned to the Commission before 
work begins. 



246 



SECTION 15 PRE-ACOUISITION VIOLATION 

Any person who purchases, inherits or otherwise 
acquires real estate upon which work has been done in 
violation of the provisions of this Bylaw or in violation of 
any permit issued pursuant to this Bylaw shall forthwith 
comply with any such order to restore such land to its 
condition prior to any violation; provided, however, that 
no action, civil or criminal, shall be brought against such 
person unless commenced within three years following the 
date of acquisition of the real estate by such person. 

SECTION 16 LEGAL ACTION 

The Board of Selectmen shall, upon the request of 
the Conservation Commission, instruct Town Counsel to 
take such legal action as may be necessary to restrain a 
violation of this Bylaw, and enforce the orders of the 
Commission hereunder and the Town Counsel shall 
forthwith comply with such instructions. 

SECTION 17 REGULATIONS 

After due notice and public hearing, the 
Commission may promulgate rules and regulations to 
effectuate the purposes of this Bylaw. Failure by the 
Commission to promulgate such rules and regulations or a 
legal declaration of their invalidity by a court or law shall 
not act to suspend or invalidate the effect of this Bylaw. 



247 



SECTION 18 FEE SCHEDULE 

Rules: 1.) Permit fees are payable at the time of 
application and are non-refundable. 

2.) Town, County, State or Federal projects are 
exempt from fees. 

Fees: The Commission may adopt and impose project 
review charges in accordance with regulations 
promulgated pursuant to its authority under 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

In addition, if the Commission deems it necessary 
to obtain an independent engineering review, the cost of 
obtaining adequate engineering and environmental 
information shall be borne by the applicant. This cost 
must be paid by the applicant prior to the issuance of an 
Order of Conditions or the Commission will render the 
application incomplete. 

SECTION 19 DEFINITIONS 

The following definitions shall apply in the 
interpretation and implementation of this Bylaw: 

a) The term "person" shall include any individual, 
group of individuals, association, partnership, 
corporation, company, business organization, trust, 
estate, the Commonwealth or political subdivision 
thereof to the extent subject to town bylaws, 
administrative agencies, public or quasi-public 
corporations or bodies, the Town of Chelmsford, 
and any other legal entity, its legal representatives, 
agents or assigns. 



248 



b) The term "applicant" as used in this Bylaw shall 
mean a person giving Notice of Intent to build, 
remove, fill, dredge or alter. 

c) The term "alter" shall include, without limitation, 
the following actions when undertaken in areas 
subject to this Bylaw: 

1 . Removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, 
gravel or aggregate material of any kind: 

2. Changing of pre-existing drainage 
characteristics, flushing characteristics, salinity 
distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns 
and flood storage retention characteristics; 

3. Drainage or other disturbance of water level or 
water table; 

4. Dumping, discharging, filling with any material 
or other activity which may degrade water quality 
in or out of the Town of Chelmsford; 

5. Driving of piles, erection of buildings or 
structures of any kind; 

6. Placing of obstructions whether or not they 
interfere with the flow of water; 

7. Destruction of plant life, including cutting of 
trees; 

8. Changing of water temperature, biochemical 
oxygen demand or other physical or chemical 
characteristics of the water. 



249 



d) The term "banks" shall mean that part of land 
adjoining any body of water which confines the 
water. 

e) The terms "marsh", "freshwater wetland", swamp", 
"wet meadow", and "bog" as used in this Bylaw 
shall be defined as defined in G.L. Chapter 131, 
Section 40. The Commission may adopt additional 
definitions not inconsistent with this Section 16 of 
this Bylaw. The boundary of these wetlands is the 
line within which fifty (50) percent or more of the 
vegetation consists of wetland plant species as set 
forth in Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 131, Section 40 and in situations where a 
dispute exists the line within which the soil 
conditions meet the technical criterion of a hydric 
soil as defined by currently approved Army Corps 
of Engineers delineation manual. 

f) The term "building" as used in this By-Law shall 
mean a structure enclosed within exterior walls or 
firewalls, built, erected, and framed of a 
combination of any materials, whether portable or 
fixed, having a roof, to form a structure for the 
shelter of persons, animals, or property. For the 
purpose of this definition, "roof shall include an 
awning or any similar covering, whether or not 
permanent in nature. 

g) The terms "land under water bodies or waterways", 
"vernal pool habitat", shall be defined as defined 
in 310 CMR 10.04. 



250 



h) The term "lower floodplain" shall mean the area of 
land within the statistical 10 year flood or within 
100 feet of the bank or boundary vegetated 
wetland, whichever is further from the waterbody 
or waterway. 

i) The term "wildlife" shall mean all mammals, birds, 

reptiles, amphibians and all vertebrate and 
invertebrate animal species, except domesticated 
species. 

j) The term "wildlife habitant" shall mean those areas 

subject to these "By-Laws" which due to the plant 
community composition and structure, hydrologic 
regime, or other characteristics provide important 
food, shelter, migratory travel or overwintering 
areas or breeding areas for wildlife. 

k) The term "rare species" shall mean those vertebrate 
and invertebrate animal species officially listed as 
endangered, threatened, or of special concern by 
the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife under 321 CMR 8.00 and those plant 
species listed as rare, threatened, or endangered by 
the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program. 

1) The term "abutter" shall include owners of property 

immediately adjacent, across a road or water body, 
and in another municipality if within 300' of the 
boundary of the property where work is proposed. 

m) The term "areas subject to protection" shall include 
the resource areas described in Section 2 of this 
bylaw. 



251 



n) The term "buffer zone" shall mean that area of 
uplands within 100' horizontally outward from the 
boundary of a resource area. 

o) The term "interests protected by this bylaw" shall 
include public or private water supply, 
groundwater supply, flood control, erosion 
control, storm damage prevention, water pollution 
prevention, fisheries, shellfish, wildlife habitat, 
recreation and aesthetics. 

p) The term "resource areas" shall mean the same as 
areas subject to protection. 

The Commission may adopt additional definitions 
not inconsistent with this Section 19 of this bylaw. 

SECTION 20 SECURITY 

The Commission may require, as a permit 
condition that the performance and observance of other 
conditions be secured by one or both of the following 
methods: 

a) By a bond or deposit of money or negotiable 
securities in an amount determined by the 
commission to be sufficient to secure performance 
of conditions and observance of the safeguards of 
such Order of Conditions and payable to the Town 
of Chelmsford upon default; 

b) By conservation restriction, easement or by a 
covenant, executed and duly recorded by the owner 
of record, running with the land, whereby the 



252 



conditions and safeguards included in such Order 
of Conditions shall be performed before any lot 
may be conveyed other than by mortgage deed. 

SECTION 21 ENFORCEMENT 

Any person who violates any provision of this 
Bylaw or of any conditions of a permit issued pursuant to 
it shall be punished by a fine of not more than $300.00. 
Each day or portion thereof during which a violation 
continues shall constitute a separate offense. This Bylaw 
may be enforced by a Town police officer or other officer 
having police powers. Upon request of the Commission, 
the Board of Selectmen and Town Counsel shall take such 
legal action as may be necessary to enforce this Bylaw and 
permits issued pursuant to it. 

SECTION 22 INVALIDITY 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this 
Bylaw shall not invalidate any other section or provision 
thereof, nor shall it invalidate any Order of Conditions 
which have previously become final. 

SECTION 23 WILDLIFE HABITAT EVALUATION 

1. Measuring Adverse Effects on Wildlife Habitat 

a. To the extent that a proposed project will alter 
vernal pool habitat or will alter other wildlife 
habitat such alterations may be permitted only if 
they will have no adverse effects on wildlife or 
vernal habitat. Adverse effects on wildlife or 
vernal habitat shall mean the alteration of any 
habitat characteristic such as food, shelter, 



253 



migratory breeding and overwintering areas, 
insofar as such alteration will, follow 2 growing 
seasons of project completion and thereafter (or, if 
a project would eliminate trees, upon the maturity 
of replanted saplings) substantially reduce its 
capacity to provide important wildlife and vernal 
habitat functions. Such performance standards, 
however, shall not apply to the habitat of rare 
species. All projects that may impact on rare 
species must apply through the Massachusetts 
Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program 
at least 90 days prior to the filing of a Notice of 
Intent. 

b. An evaluation by the applicant of whether a 
proposed project will have an adverse effect on 
wildlife habitat beyond permissible thresholds shall 
be performed by an individual with at least a 
masters degree in wildlife biology or ecological 
science from an accredited college or university, or 
other competent professional with at least 2 years 
experience in wildlife habitat evaluation. 

c. Any wildlife habitat management practices 
conducted by the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife, and any wildlife management practices of 
any individual or organization if reviewed and 
approved in writing by said Division, shall be 
presumed to have no adverse effect on wildlife 
habitat. Such presumption is rebuttal, and may be 
overcome by a clear showing to the contrary. 



254 



2. Wildlife Habitat Characteristics of Inland Resource 

Areas: 

a. Banks. The topography, soil structure, and 
plant community composition and structure of 
banks can provide the following important wildlife 
habitat functions: food, shelter, migratory wildlife, 
breeding and overwintering areas of wildlife. 

b. Land Under Water Bodies or Waterways. The 
plant community and soil composition and 
structure, hydrologic regime, topography and water 
quality of land under water bodies or waterways 
can provide the following important wildlife 
habitat functions: food, shelter, breeding areas and 
overwintering areas for wildlife. 

c. Vernal Pool Habitat. The topography, soil 
structure, plant community composition and 
structure, and hydrologic regime of vernal pool 
habitat can provide the following important 
wildlife habitat functions: food, shelter, migratory, 
breeding, and overwintering areas for wildlife. 

d. Lower Flood Plans. The hydrologic regime, 
plant community, and soil composition and 
structure, topography, and proximity to water 
bodies and waterways of lower floodplains can 
provide the following important wildlife habitat 
functions: food, shelter, migratory, overwintering 
and breeding areas for wildlife. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to release all right, title 
and interest in a portion of a drainage easement date June 



255 



11, 1977 and recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds Book 2312 Page 248. The easement 
area to be released contains approximately 1,118 square 
feet of land and is further described and shown as 
"Easement Area Released" on a Plan to be presented at 
Town Meeting, a copy of which is on file in the office of 
the Town Engineer and is incorporated by reference. 

The Town Manager explained that a house had 
been built on an easement. The easement wasn't 
discovered until after the construction. This would allow 
the owner to obtain a clear title. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $12,500.00 for the purpose of providing Senior 
Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for services 
rendered, pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by the 
Council on Aging and approved by the Town Manager. 

The Town Manager said that he had explained this 
article previously, and asked for support. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen supported the article. The Moderator asked for 
a vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $150,000.00 for labor contract settlements 
regarding collective bargaining matters. 



256 



The Town Manager explained that this was a new 
concept for the Town. This was suggested by bond 
counsel as a possible way to have monies available 
immediately when contracts are settled. By having this 
reserve account, other departments wouldn't have to cut 
back within their budgets when funding is needed. 
Questions were asked regarding the affect this would have 
on negotiations. Concerns were voiced on the lost of 
control and monitoring the funds. The Town Manager 
explained that the Town Meeting process would not be 
used until all the monies are gone from this account. He 
would use the money and settle the contract. If additional 
money is needed then a special town meeting would have 
to be called and the required additional amount would then 
be discussed and voted. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. A majority of the Board of 
Selectmen did not support the article. A discussion took 
place. Representatives spoke for and against the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,410.00 with which to meet bills from 
previous years. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Selectman Robert P. Joyce, 
moved that the reading of the article be waived. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. Jeffrey Stallard, member of the Celebration 



257 



Committee explained that the purpose of this article is to 
be able to enforce a safety issue. Along the fourth of July 
parade route, there is an area where the road narrows. This 
is where the crowd is highly packed. Vendors travel up 
and down the area, and when asked to leave they don't. 
Currently with no By-Law, because these vendors are 
licensed by the State they do not have to be licensed by the 
Town, so the Town cannot restrict them, its known as fair 
trade. He asked for support of the article. A number of 
Representatives asked questions. The Finance Committee 
did not recommend the article. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. A discussion took place. The 
matter of safety vs trade was the topic. Karen Ready 
moved to amend the article under section one, d. Winter 
Prelude. She felt that this event should be included in the 
list. The Finance Committee supported the amendment. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the amendment. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 
Barry Balan moved to eliminate section two in its entirety 
and renumber the sections left beginning with number 2. 
The Finance Committee did not recommend the motion. 
The Board of Selectmen did not have a recommendation. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. More discussion took place. William 
Griffin moved to amend the article by adding at the 
beginning of the sentence under section one: For the 
purpose of public safety, no person etc etc. The Finance 
Committee supported the article to amend. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hand, motion carried. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands on the main 
motion as amended, motion carried. The article reads as 
follows: 



258 



Jeffrey Stallard moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-laws Article VII 
MISCELLANEOUS by adding the following: 

Section 13 Restricted Vendor Areas 

1 . For the purpose of public safety, no person shall 
offer for sale or sell any articles on the public ways 
or Town Owned Property designated on plans 
approved by the Board of Selectmen, during the 
following periods: 

a. The Annual Independence Day Celebration. 

b. Veterans memorial services 

c. The Annual Winterfest 

d. Winter Prelude 

e. Other events approved by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

2. The Board of Selectmen shall review each special 
event seeking to fall under this By-Law with the 
sponsor (s) to determine whether a restricted area 
shall be designated for the event. Should a 
restricted area be needed, the plan of the proposed 
area shall be submitted to the Board of Selectmen 
for approval a minimum of one month prior to the 
event. 

3. This By-Law shall not prohibit hawkers, peddlers, 
or vendors form selling their products on the public 
ways of the Town during any period not designated 
above or in any area outside the area designated on 
the plans referred to above. 



259 



Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
the Moderator adjourned the meeting. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 9:10 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



260 



WARRANT FOR 

THE FALL SESSION OF 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 16, 1995 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the Town Meeting 
representatives of said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior 
Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford on Monday, the 
sixteenth of October, at 7:30 p.m. o'clock in the evening 
then and there to act upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents in the Town Clerk's Office. 



261 



ANNUAL FALL TOWN MEETING 
October 16, 1995 

The Town by-law states that the Annual Fall 
meeting be held on the third Monday in October. The 
Annual Fall Town Meeting was posted for Monday 
October 16th, to begin at 7:30 PM, at the Senior Center on 
Groton Road. A Special Town Election was posted to be 
held on Tuesday October 17th. A few representatives were 
present and questioned why no attendance will be taken. 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh stated that there was no 
quorum present, and asked for a motion to adjourn. Robert 
Joyce moved to adjourn the meeting to 7:30 PM on 
Thursday October 19, 1995, at the Senior Center on 
Groton Road. The first order of business will be article 
one. The meeting adjourned at 7:35 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



262 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
OCTOBER 17, 1995 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meeting their several polling places, 
VIZ: 

Precinct 1 : 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 
Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 
Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 



263 



On Tuesday, the 17th day of October, 1995 being the 
third Tuesday in said month at 12 noon until 8:00 p.m. for 
the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

One Selectman for Unexpired 18 months; 

and to vote on the following question: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to exempt from 
the provisions of Proposition two and one-half, so-called, 
the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order 
to design, construct and originally equip an addition to 
the Adam's Library? 

The polls will be open from 12 noon until 8:00 p.m. 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



264 



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265 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL FALL MEETING 
October 19, 1995 

The Adjourned Annual Fall Meeting was called to 
order at the Senior Center on Groton Road, at 7:35 PM, by 
the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh. The Moderator 
recognized the presence of a quorum, there were 158 Town 
Meeting Representatives present. 

The Moderator went over the town meeting 
procedures and pointed out the fire exits. He then asked 
for the Town Meeting Representatives to allow Robert A. 
Goober, who would be assisting the Sewer Commission 
with their articles, to speak from time to time during the 
articles. Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
then welcomed newly elected Selectman Thomas Welch to 
the meeting. 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to waive the 
reading of the Constables posting of the warrant. Motion 
carried, unanimously. Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved 
to waive the reading of the entire warrant. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, gave a presentation to the Body about the on 
going sewer project, the future areas to be sewered, the 
amount of money that has been spent so far. In some cases 
identical properties a few streets apart from each other 
have unequal value, because one has sewage and the other 
has a septic system. Under the current project that started 



266 



in 1989, 68% of the Town will be completely sewered. 
The Sewer Commission will ask the Town next year to 
extend the project to the remaining 32 percent or 3,678 
households. First by submitting a question at the spring 
election to allow the Town to raise taxes beyond the limits 
of Prop 2 1/2. Then by submitting an article on the 
warrant at the Annual Spring Town Meeting. The 
estimated cost will be $49 million dollars. He explained 
that Massachusetts has a new septic system regulation 
called Title 5. This has caused many burdens and 
expenses for citizens. Particularly to anyone trying to sell 
their home. The restrictions are so strict that there has been 
a 35% failure rate since March. The average repair cost is 
$12,000. Currently the cost to sewer a home is $7,500. If 
the Town decides to complete the project he felt that some 
of the costs could be covered by state and federal grants. 
If the Town doesn't receive any grants then the most it 
could cost is $49 million or $13,500 per household. 
However, if 75% funding was to be granted, then the cost 
would be $3,400 per household. If the Town does vote to 
complete the project, then the state has agreed to waive 
any Title 5 requirements. No other community has been 
offered this waiver. He thanked the Body for their 
attention. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, gave a 
presentation explaining the Fiscal condition of the Town. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 John P. Emerson Jr., 
Chairman of the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under 
Part VIII Transitional Provisions, Section 8-5 (1) Time of 
Taking Effect, by deleting the following: 



267 



(1) The Sewer Commission shall cease to exist and be 
dissolved on January 1, 2005 and all duties, 
powers, functions and assets shall be assigned to 
the department of public works or its successor 
agency. 

and add the following as Part VIII, Section 8-5(1) 

(1) The Sewer Commission shall cease to exist and be 
dissolved upon completion of the sewer project at 
which time all duties, powers, functions and assets 
shall be assigned to the department of public works 
or its successor agency. 

John P. Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission explained that this would allow the Sewer 
Commission to continue being the controlling body until 
the completion of the sewer project. This action had been 
previously voted on in the October of 1994 fall meeting. It 
did not go on the April of 1995 Town Ballot as a question, 
which is required by law. Once voted tonight a ballot 
question will be submitted to the voters in April of 1996. 
He asked for support of the article. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 John P. Emerson Jr., 
Chairman of the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Chelmsford Sewer Commission to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise any fee, 
easement or other interest in land necessary for the purpose 
of constructing and maintaining sewers, pumping stations, 
and all other appurtenances thereto, such land being 
described and shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of 



268 



Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, Massachusetts Rainbow 
Avenue Lateral Sewers dated October 1995. Prepared for 
the Chelmsford Sewer Commission by Richard F. 
Kaminski & Associates. Inc". a copy of which is on file in 
the office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein 
by reference. 

John P. Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission, explained that this action is needed in order 
to proceed forward with the sewer project in the North 
Road and Rainbow Avenue area. 

John Wilder requested the names of the property 
owners involved. Robert Goober, who represented Weston 
and Sampson, the engineering firm contracted to do the 
Sewer project, read the following names: 
S. Corey, F. Rourke, E. & M. Seneta, W. & V. Poulis, S.& 
L. Prutzer, S.& S. Hartfield, V.& D. Vallano, M.& M 
DeMartino, J. & E. Turcotte, D. Soha, J. & M. Milisci, J. 
Kordash, D. Wood and C.W. Morgan, Trustee. 

Hearing no further discussion the Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee's recommendation. John 
Morrison, Chairman of the Finance Committee said that 
the Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hand, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Peter V. Lawlor 
explained that this article is to be withdrawn at this time. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. It read as follows: 

Should the Town vote subject to enactment of 
enabling legislation to borrow a sum of money to assist 



269 



Chelmsford homeowners to install or upgrade Title 5 
septic systems on their property. To authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the General Court for an act to 
authorize the Town to borrow a sum of money for this 
purpose and impose upon the benefited homeowners 
assessments and personal liability for repayment of the 
debt incurred for their benefit? 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, 
management and control of the following described parcel 
of land to the Board of Selectmen to be held for the 
purpose of conveyance and to authorized the Board of 
Selectman to convey in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 3 OB, for consideration to be 
determined, all right title and interest, if any, held by the 
Town in a certain parcel of land on Old Westford Road, 
shown as Lot 5 on Assessors Map 28, containing 40,000 
square feet more or less; and more fully described in a 
deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Book 6433, Page 339. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
is a routine article in the case of selling Town owned land. 
The land will go out for competitive bid and all the abuters 
will be notified and the land will be awarded to the highest 
bidder. John Wilder questioned if the land was wet and is 
that the reason it is being sold? The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 John B. Sousa Jr, Cemetery 
Superintendent moved that the Town vote to accept the 
following Regulations for Cemeteries adopted by the 



270 



Board of Cemetery Commissioners for governance of all 
public cemeteries in the Town of Chelmsford pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 1 14, Section 23: 

REGULATIONS FOR CEMETERIES 

Town of Chelmsford 

Board of Cemetery Commissioners 

The following regulations have been adopted by 
the Board of Cemetery Commissioners for the governance 
of all public cemeteries in the Town of Chelmsford, 
control of which is entrusted to the said Board of Cemetery 
Commissioners. 

I OWNERSHIP 

1 . The right granted to the owner of any lot or grave 
is a sole and exclusive right of burial and the 
erection of monuments or markers subject to the 
terms, conditions, and regulations of the board of 
Cemetery Commissioners as they may exist form 
time to time. The premises in which such rights 
are granted shall be used only for the purpose of a 
place of burial for the dead. 

2. The owners of rights of burial in the cemeteries, or 
their heirs, shall not grant, sell, alienate or convey 
the said exclusive right of burial, to a person or 
person without having obtained the written 
approval and consent of the commissioners, but it 
shall be optional with the commissioners to grant 
or withhold such approval and consent. A 
statement should be filed with the cemetery office 
listing the names and addresses of all heirs and a 
majority of the heirs must designate one of their 



271 



number to be representative. If no such statement 
is filed, the Commissioners, after notice to the 
interested parties, may designate one of the heirs as 
representative. 

3. Any owner of a right of burial who wishes to sell a 
lot, shall so advise the Commissioners who may 
repurchase the lot or unused portion of said lot for 
the same sum that was paid by the owner or for a 
proportional sum for the unused graves. 

4. All burials in said graves or lots shall be under the 
personal charge of the Superintendent of 
Cemeteries. All work within the immediate 
vicinity of a funeral shall be suspended until the 
conclusion of the religious services. 

5. No interments shall be made until the 
superintendent shall have been furnished with a 
permit such as may be required by the laws of the 
Commonwealth, together with an order from the 
owner of the right of burial in the lot, in which the 
interment is to be made, or from a legal 
representative. No interment shall be made until 
the fees provided for in the schedule adopted by the 
Commissioners shall have been paid. 

6. Neither the Town nor the Cemetery Commissioners 
and the officers and employees thereof shall be 
held responsible for any order given, or mistakes 
occurring, due to the lack of precise and proper 
information or instructions from the owner of the 
rights of burial or a legal representative as to the 
particular space, size and locations in a plot where 
an interment or disinterment is desired. 



272 



7. The Cemetery Commissioners reserve the right to 
correct any errors that may be made in making 
interments, disinterments or removals and neither 
they nor the Town nor the respective officers and 
employees thereof shall be held liable on account 
of the failure of any devises to operate normally or 
conditions beyond their control. 

8. Every earth interment shall be made in a concrete 
box or in an outer container of stone, concrete or a 
combination thereof, of sufficient strength and 
durability to constitute a reasonable permanent 
support for the weight above it. 

9. All fees for opening or preparing a grave shall be 
paid at the office of the Cemetery Department. 
There will be an extra charge for Saturday or 
holiday interments and after the hour of four P.M. 
of any working day. 

10. No grave shall be opened for interment by any 
person not in the employ of the Cemetery 
Department. 

II PERPETUAL CARE 

1. The owner of a right of burial must create a 
permanent fund according to the schedule adopted 
by the Commissioners, the income from which is 
be used forever to fill, level, top dress, cut and take 
care of the grass on said lot or grave. Any 
remaining income from the fund is to be used by 
the Commissioners as they deem to be for the best 
interest of the lot or grave. 



273 



Ill MONUMENTS 

1. No monuments shall be erected without the 
approval of the Superintendent and according to 
the specifications adopted by the Commissioners. 

2. Only one central or family memorial shall be 
allowed on a family lot and only in that space 
reserved for it. All flat markers must be set flush 
with the ground. No corner boundary markers are 
permitted on lots. The Cemetery Commissioners 
reserve the right to remove corner posts and 
curbings deemed necessary for the benefit of the 
cemetery. 

3. All foundations for monuments must be installed 
by Cemetery Department employees. A foundation 
for a memorial shall not be built on any lot for 
which there is a claim by the Town or Cemetery 
Commissioners against the owner for any 
indebtedness. 

4. All foundation orders require a signed statement by 
the lot owner and memorial manufacturer and must 
be accompanied by the applicable fee for same. 

5. If any monument, effigy or any structure whatever, 
or any inscription be placed in or upon any lot or 
grave, which shall be determined by 
Commissioners to be offensive or improper, the 
Cemetery Commissioners shall have the right to 
order its removal, and if the owner or legal 
representative fails to remove it, the 
Commissioners shall have the right to enter upon 



274 



such lot or grave and remove the said offensive or 
improper object. 

6. When any memorial is to be removed or any 
inscription made thereon, or to be cleaned or 
repaired, a written request must be made to the 
Superintendent giving the owner's address and also 
giving the name and address of the person who is 
to do the work. 

7. Monument restrictions and sizes are as follows: 





FLAT MAKERS 




Lot Size 


Length 


Width 


Thickness 


Single 


2'±i" 


IT' ±3/4" 


4" Min. 


Double 


y± r 


VT ± 3/4" 


4" Min. 




MONUMENTS 






Length 


Width 


Total Height 


Double 


3T'±7" 


l'6"Max. 


3* ± 2" 


Three/Four 


4*3" ± 1'3" 


l'6"Max. 


3' ± 2" 


Six/Eight 


67" ± 17" 


2'0"Max. 


3' ± 2" 



Exceptions may be made with the approval of the 
Superintendent and Commissioners. 

Note: Monuments are not allowed on single grave lots 



275 



IV WORK ON LOTS 

1. No other person than the owner, except the 
Superintendent or his employees, shall be allowed 
to perform any work on a lot or parcel of ground 
without a permit for the Superintendent, obtained 
upon application, and all persons so employed shall 
be under the control and supervision of the 
Superintendent. 

2. The cemetery grounds must be left in good order 
upon the conclusion of any work on a lot. All work 
must be done during the work hours of the 
cemetery, and cease at the close of the working 
day. 

3. Workmen employed in the construction of vaults, 
the erection of monuments, etc. shall be subject to 
the control and direction of the Superintendent, and 
any workman failing to conform with these 
regulations will not afterwards be permitted to 
work in the grounds. 

4. The Superintendent is responsible for the care of 
the cemeteries and he is authorized to remove all 
persons who violate these regulations, and directed 
to cause violators of the law to be prosecuted. 

V GENERAL CARE 

1. On graves or lots where no monument has been 

erected, under no condition shall the sod be 
allowed to be broken or removed. 



276 



2. No tree within a lot or upon a grave shall be cut 
down or removed without the consent of the 
Cemetery Commissioners. 

3. When owners perform any work on their lots or 
graves, they must remove all refuse material to 
such places as are provided by the Superintendent. 

4. No person shall gather any flowers, either wild or 
cultivated, in a cemetery nor shall he remove, cut, 
break, or mark any tree, shrub or plant, or shall 
mark, deface or injure any monument, building 
rustic seat or other structure within a cemetery. 

5. No person shall rest upon lots which do not belong 
to him, or walk upon or across lots or lawns to gain 
access to their lots or graves, other than by paths or 
avenues so designated. 

6. Children are not allowed in the cemeteries, except 
when accompanied by a parent or some adult 
having them in charge. 

7. Persons carrying refreshments or intoxicating 
beverages, will not be permitted in cemeteries, nor 
persons with firearms, except at military funerals. 
The use of all other implements calculated to annoy 
or destroy birds, squirrels or any other harmless 
animals found thereon is strictly forbidden. 

8. No owner or other person shall be allowed to 
maintain a lot at any other grade, or cause the same 
to be graded in any other manner than that 
established by the Cemetery Commissioners. 



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9. No employee shall receive any fee or gratuity from 
any person except the standard fees prescribed by 
the Cemetery Commissioners and to be paid to the 
Town Treasurer. Any employee violating this rule 
shall be dismissed. 

10. The Cemetery Commissioners shall have the 
authority to grant permission to owners to depart in 
special instances from the provisions of the 
foregoing regulations, in and only in cases where it 
clearly appears that the spirit and intent of the 
regulations will not thereby be violated. 

11. Dogs, pets and recreational activities are 
prohibited. 

VI PLANTING RULES 

1. No urns, window boxes, markers, boxed wreaths, 
fences curbing, hedges, trees or other ornaments or 
memorials of a permanent nature shall be placed or 
planted upon the graves or lots without the 
approval of the Superintendent. 

2. Autumn decorations and plants shall be removed 
by November 11th. Christmas decorations and 
wreaths shall be removed by April 1st. 

3. One flower bed is allowed on each monument lot 
and shall not extend more than 14" from the base 
of the monument. 

4. Flower beds may not be outlined with stones, 
marble chips, curbings, fencing, or edging made of 
metal, wood, or vinyl. 



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5. If any shrub situated in any lot, or upon any grave, 
shall by means of its roots or branches or otherwise 
become detrimental to said lots, or to the adjacent 
lots, avenues or paths, or dangerous or 
inconvenient, the commissioners or the 
Superintendent or his employees shall have the 
right to enter upon said lot or grave and remove 
said tree, shrub or bush or parts thereof as are thus 
detrimental, dangerous or inconvenient. 

6. It is not allowable to outline a plot or grave with 
evergreens, curbings, flowers, etc. 

7. Shrubs may be planted near monuments with the 
permission of the Cemetery Superintendent. 

8. Rose bushes and other thorny plantings are not 
permitted. 

9. Baskets or other containers, not of a permanent 
nature, must be removed by the owners if they wish 
to preserve them, otherwise they shall be removed 
by the Superintendent, when in his judgement the 
plants or flowers have decayed. 

10. Decayed flowers or plants shall be removed by the 
Superintendent when deemed advisable. Artificial 
flowers and decorations are not permitted. 

11. Flowers must not be brought into a cemetery 
except for decoration, and they must not be carried 
out under any pretense whatever, except by 
permission of the Superintendent. 



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12. The Cemetery Department is not responsible for 
any flowers or any other decorations placed on 
graves or lots by the owners. 

VII MISCELLANEOUS 

1. The Cemetery Commissioners may adopt a 
schedule of fees for interments and other services 
and privileges provided to owners, and may make 
such orders and take such actions as are necessary 
to implement these regulations. 

John Sousa explained that these regulations have 
been in affect for the past forty-five years. Due to an 
oversight, they had never been brought forth to the Town 
for an official vote of approval. He said that the Cemetery 
Commissioner's approved of the regulations and asked for 
support. Barbara Ward asked a question about section 6. 
Plantings. Under line item 10. She wanted to know if the 
Cemetery Commissioner's were in fact really going to 
enforce not allowing artificial flowers and decorations? 
John Sousa explained that at this time the rule is there, and 
the Commissioner's allow for discretion. If any object is 
really offensive, then it is removed from the site. The 
Commissioners didn't want to change any of the actual 
regulations until they've been officially accepted. Before 
any new publication is produced some changes will be 
made. The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to accept the following 
mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen 



280 



and shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 
Town Engineer: 

1. Burton Lane 

2. Scotty Hollow Drive 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple, with 
trees thereon, by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of securing traffic safety and road 
improvements; to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contacts 
and agreements thereto. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the 
article. John Wilder questioned if there were any costs 
involved? No there were not. George Merrill questioned 
the length of acceptance Scotty Hollow Drive would be. 
James Pearson, DPW Superintendent, said that only 900 
feet in from Groton Road was the accepted public distance, 
the rest was private. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash the sum of $7,899.00 to pay bills of previous fiscal 
years. 



281 



The Town Manager explained that bills were 
received after the books were closed in June, and they 
must be paid from the free cash. He presented the 
following list: 



Office supplies 


$ 594.19 


City of Lowell Sewage 


3,542.60 


Stablization Fund Fee 


1,174.70 


Legal Bills 


1,389.27 


Police/Fire Retires 


1.197.34 


TOTAL 


$7,898.10 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that this article be withdrawn. The Town Manager 
explained that the petitioner of the article asked to have the 
article withdrawn at this time. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. It read as 
follows: 

Should the Town vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law, Section 2110 Official Zoning map as it pertains to 
certain parcels of land located northerly of Riverneck 
Road, easterly of Carter Drive and Cove Street, and 
southerly of Route 495, and being parcels of land shown 
on Assessors Map 107 Parcel 54, Map 108 Parcels 14 and 
40, a portion of Map 109 Parcel 50, and Map 109 Parcels 
53 and 54, and Map 110 Parcels 13 and 14 by changing the 
designation of those lots from I A to RB. 



282 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, explained that the petitioner of this article was not 
present and had submitted a letter requesting not to 
proceed with the action. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The article read as 
follows: Should the Town vote to authorize or direct the 
Board of Selectmen to convey to Edward Fabbri, for 
consideration to be determined, all right, title and interest 
held by the Town in a certain parcel of land off Second 
Street known as lot 32 on Assessor's Map 130, containing 
4,127 square feet more or less; and more fully described in 
a deed recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
in Book 6933, Page 38. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 1 The Moderator read to the 
body a letter submitted by Nancy Knight, Chairman of the 
Library Trustees dated October 19th: 

"As a result of the defeat of the library exemption article 
on the October 17, 1995 Special Election, The Board of 
Library Trustees has voted to withdraw from consideration 
Article 1 1 from the Warrant for the Fall Session of the 
1995 Annual Town Meeting. Respectfully, Nancy J. 
Knight, Chair Chelmsford Public Library Board of Library 
Trustees" 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that he 
had met also with the Trustees and there are a few items 
that need to be addressed, regardless of the outcome of the 
vote. One being the handicap accessibility issue. The 
Trustees will come back in the future with plans and costs. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to withdraw, motion carried, unanimously. The 
article read as follows: Should the Town vote to raise and 



283 



appropriate, a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
designing, constructing, and originally equipping an 
addition to the Adams Library. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 The Moderator read a 
motion by Selectman Robert Joyce, to amend the article by 
deleting the reference to Assessors' Map 81, Lot 12. 
Selectman Joyce explained that this was the area 
previously known as the Glenview Sand and Gravel site. 
It was the Board's concern that it was too close to an 
residential area. He said that Selectman Lawlor would 
give further explanation. 

Selectman Lawlor said the main purpose of the 
article and the reasoning of the Board of Selectmen is to 
expand the present CX zone to include two more areas in a 
IA zone with an CX overlay. Presently the Town could 
have an establishment opened anywhere and have no 
grounds to prevent it, because the courts could find the 
present zoned areas too restrictive and in violation of first 
amendment rights. The Town must have realistic areas in 
order to be able to enforce control with by-laws of rules 
and regulations. By having actual zoned areas these are 
the only locations where adult entertainment business 
establishments could exist. The IA zone was chosen 
because these areas are primarily zoned for industrial 
purposes. Only certain items are allowed in this zone. 
With the CX overlay, it would require Planning Board 
recommendation, and Town Meeting action in order for 
the actual use to take place. John Wilder wanted to know 
who owned the properties in question? Selectman Lawlor 
said that Map 123 Lot 32 was owned by Joseph J. Balbonir 
Trust and B & L Realty Trust. Lot 33,34,35, are owned by 
Raymond A & Barbara F. Carye Trustees. Lot 37 is 
owned by Appleseed LTD Partnership. Map 242 Lot 1 is 



284 



owned by New Boston Chelmsford LTD Partnership. Lot 
18 MGI Chelmsford Corp. John Wilder then wanted to 
know what exactly is allowed in a CX zone? Selectman 
Lawlor read the zoning by-law to the Body. Adult 
entertainment establishments, adult bookstore, adult 
motion picture theater, adult video stores, etc. Questions 
were asked concerning the sites chosen. 

At this point Selectman Robert Joyce introduced 
the Town's newly appointed Town Counsel, John Giorgio, 
from the Law firm of Kopelman and Paige. John Giorgio 
re-confirmed everything that Selectman Lawlor said. He 
stressed that if the Representatives didn't vote for this 
zoning change it would open a window of opportunity for 
X-rated business to open in the Town. Bill Griffin 
questioned how many acres are involved. The Town 
Manager Bernard Lynch said that there were roughly 
sixteen acres per site. Linda Allen and Rodney Cleaves 
expressed the concerns from the neighborhood residents 
next to the Industrial Ave area. There are many homes 
that directly abut the land in question. In one section are 
no trees or buffers between these homes and the present 
buildings. She felt that the Board of Selectmen didn't take 
the neighborhood into consideration. John Giorgoi 
explained that the Representatives could redefine the zone" 
at a later meeting. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show 
of hands on Selectman Joyce's motion to amend by 
deleting the Glenview Sand and Gravel site. Motion 
carried. The Moderator then asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
supported the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for the 
Planning Board's recommendation. 



285 



Chairman James M. Creegan read the Board's 
recommendation: "The Planning Board held a public 
hearing on October 11, 1995 on the above mentioned 
article, after advertising a legal notice in the Lowell Sun 
on September 20th and 27th, 1995, a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all 
abutting towns and the appropriate agencies, as required in 
the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40 A, Section 5. 
At the meetings of October 11 and October 19, 1995, the 
proponents, residents and the Planning Board discussed the 
merits of this zoning map change. It is the opinion of the 
Planning Board that the warrant article should be approved 
by Town Meeting contingent upon the removal of the Sand 
and Gravel pit which is 30 acres located in Drum Hill off 
Steadman Street. Therefore, in keeping consistent with the 
general intent of the Zoning By-laws in the development 
of the community, the Planning Board voted (4-1) to 
recommend with the above mentioned contingency an 
amendment to the Town of Chelmsford Zoning Map to 
establish additional Adult Entertainment (CX) Zoning 
District as overlay district in certain areas of the Town 
currently zoned Limited Industrial (IA). 

James Creegan said that the Planning Board voted 
to further study this issue by way of forming a 
sub-committee. If need be the Committee will make 
further recommendations to the master plan committee, 
that is being addressed under article 17 of this warrant. 

Dennis Ready spoke against the article. Other 
area's should be considered, such as historic buildings that 
are privately owned. He moved to defer article 12 to a 
committee to act as an ad hoc counsel in drafting articles 
for town meeting pertaining to adult entertainment in 



286 



Chelmsford. The Committee will be appointed by the 
Town Manager. 

The Moderator asked for the Board's 
recommendation. Both the Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were against the motion to defer. 
Selectman Joyce asked for Town Counsel's opinion. John 
Giorgio recommended against deferring. He said that 
tabling would only allow six months delay on the two 
parcels shown tonight. It would not address the actual 
issue because it can be challenged in the meantime. A 
discussion took place. Many Representatives spoke 
against the motion to table and spoke in favor of the 
article. Allen Thomas moved the question to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to table. Motion defeated. Richard Day 
moved to amend the article by deleting the reference to 
Assessor's map 242, Lots 1 and 18, and Assessors Map 
123, lots 34 and 35. He explained that this would remove 
all vacant lots show on the two maps. Selectman Joyce 
said that the article should be passed as presented, the 
more it is amended the weaker it becomes. Selectman 
Susan Gates spoke against the motion to amend, and spoke 
in favor of the article as voted as amended by the Board. 
She felt that it was now the Representatives responsibility 
to act upon this issue tonight without further delay. If this 
isn't addressed and established then a business can open up 
anywhere in Town. Samuel Poulten spoke in favor of the 
motion to amend by deleting the vacant lots. Allen 
Thomas moved the question to stop debate. Motion 
carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. Cheryl 
Warshafsky asked for a roll call. The Moderator said this 
was out of order. A roll call vote can only be done for the 



287 



vote taken on a main motion, not on a motion to amend. 
Michael Sockol moved the question to stop further debate. 
Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the main motion as amended. This left 
the Chair in doubt. The following tellers came forward, 
Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, John 
Maleski and a hand count was taken: Yes 125 No 16 2/3's 
is 94, the motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to amend the 
official zoning map of the Town of Chelmsford to 
establish, as overlay zoning districts, the following areas as 
adult entertainment districts (CX): Assessors' map 123, 
Lots 32, 33,34, 35 and 37; Assessors' map 242, Lots 1 and 
18; and that the uses now permitted in the underlying 
zones shall not be affected by this zoning amendment. 

Allan Thomas moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday October 23rd at 7:30 PM at the Senior Citizen 
Center. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

The Meeting adjourned at 1 1 : 1 5 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



288 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
October 23, 1995 

Moderator Dennis J. McHugh, recognized the 
presence of a quorum and called the meeting to order at 
7:35 PM, at the Senior Center on Groton Road. There 
were 139 Town Meeting Representatives present. He 
made a few public announcements. One being that due to a 
conflict he was going to step down as Moderator for 
Article 13, and the Town Clerk, Mary E. St.Hilaire, would 
be the acting Moderator, for this article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to execute a contract with Ogden-Martin Inc. for 
solid waste disposal for a term not to exceed ten years. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that the 
Town was looking for a long term contract that will 
guarantee a place to bring trash for ten years. Right now 
the Town pays $45.00 a ton, which will definitely increase 
at the end of the contract. This new contract will not only 
guarantee a place for trash to go, it will guarantee a yearly 
cost for each of the ten years of the contract. The only 
way the costs can be increased is if the State or Federal 
government changes the law, or if there is an event of 
force majeure. Even if that happens the total additional 
cost is not to exceed a cumulative total of $30/a ton. If 
that happens then the Town can cancel the contract. John 
Wilder wanted to know about the company. The Town 
Manager said that the Company is a subsidiary of the 
Ogden Corporation, which has been in existence for many 
years. The Ogden Projects Inc., has twenty-six waste to 
energy plants, and various other types of plants, including 
power, water and wastewater and construction. Ogden 



289 



Services business groups include, entertainment, aviation, 
environmental, technology, facility. The plant that would 
handle the Town's trash is located in Haverhill, which 
generates electricity. Richard Day wanted to know what 
the highest fee charged could be? The Town Manager 
said $89.00. He showed a list of the proposed fees which 
would be contracted for the next ten years. This will 
allow for long-term financial planning and budgeting. He 
predicted that the solid waste budget will remain within 
the ceiling of the solid waste prop 2 1/2 override for all ten 
years of the contract. A discussion took place. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Acting 
Town Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Dennis McHugh returned to the podium as the 
Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to accept Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 138, Section 12B regarding the 
prohibition of nudity in any premises licensed to sell 
alcoholic beverages. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, said that the Board 
of Selectmen will have the right to prohibit the selling of 
alcoholic beverages if there is nudity on premises of an 
establishment, if this article is passed. Questions were 
asked concerning the enforcement of this in other zoning 
districts in the Town. This would only apply to the IA 
zones which have the CX overlay zone, which are the 
adult entertainment zones in the Town. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 



290 



Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Michael Sockol moved the 
to waive the reading of the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained at the 
time when petitions were to be filed, the Board of 
Selectmen were in the process of obtaining a new Town 
Counsel. The proponent had submitted the article, but 
didn't do it on the petition format. In all fairness the Town 
Manager felt he should submit the article, he was not 
endorsing it one way or the other. It was to be the 
decision of the Representatives to accept or not accept it. 
He then asked John Coppinger to explain the article. 

John Coppinger read the following statement to the 
Body: "I feel that it is important for us as elected Town 
Reps and a separate part of the Town Government that we 
be organized and informed so that we are able to better 
control our own actions and not allow yourself to be 
managed by either the Moderator, selectmen, Town 
Manager or any one else. To accomplish this we need to 
set up a table of organization to manage our own precinct 
meetings. The election of a precinct Chairman, Assistant 
Chairman and Secretary should be the number one action 
item when we hold our first meeting. Another item of top 
concern that I am constantly hearing from the town people 
and that is that they don't mind giving up their personal 
right to vote, but they want to know in hard copy just how 
we are using this valuable privilege. If we are using their 
vote for items that they agree with they want to be able to 
know and cheer for us. But at the same time, if they feel 
we are not voting their views or the best interest of the 



291 



town, as they see them. They want to know this 
information so that the next Town election they can let us 
know their feelings when they vote for their Town Reps. I 
am sure that everyone here will agree that this is a 
reasonable request and the only thing we have to do is set 
up the easiest and less time consuming procedure that will 
make it happen. It is my opinion that the proposal I am 
presenting should not take any more that 5 minutes to 
complete and We would only do polling on the final vote 
on a Warrant Article where a roll call vote is requested 
and voted for by the Town Reps. With these few brief 
remarks I hope you will better understand my reasons for 
submitting this warrant article to amend the Charter to 
correct this accountability issue that I have been told is so 
important to ALL the Town voters that we represent." 

A number of Town Meeting Representatives asked 
questions. Michael Sockol and Elizabeth Marshall 
questioned the need for having to sit together by precinct. 
They felt the Town needs to maintain diversity. Voting 
blocks may result if precincts stay together. Dean 
Carmaris wanted to know what the present tellers 
qualifications were. The Moderator explained that the 
present tellers are non-Town Meeting Representatives. 
This way there could be no controversy or any possible 
conflict. The same four people are used for every 
meeting. Sue Olsson asked if the Town CLerk, Mary 
St.Hilaire had been consulted about these possible 
changes? Mary St.Hilaire said that John Coppinger had 
met with her and she offered a few suggestions. However, 
she felt that the final decision was up to the 
Representatives concerning how they wanted to be 
monitored regarding their voting. Wendy Marcks of the 
School Committee questioned how would any 
Representative who is sitting with his or her committee 



292 



cast a vote, if not sitting with their precinct. Evelyn 
Thoren questioned the monitoring of attendance at the 
precinct meetings. Many of the Representatives must or 
do attend other committee meetings. Would this be an 
official requirement or volunteer? Strictly volunteer. 
Leonard Doolan question what type of manipulation has 
taken place? Bob Hawking said that he supported the spirit 
of the article but questioned if the proponent would be 
willing to withdraw it at this time and bring it back after 
further research. John Coppinger said that he would be 
willing to withdraw. The Moderator said that the article 
could only be withdrawn during debate. A few more 
questions were asked. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee was against the article. The Board of 
Selectmen did not recommend the article. The Moderator 
inquired if the proponent was in fact going to withdraw his 
article. John Coppinger said he decided not to withdraw 
the article. He wanted to have the Representatives vote 
one way or the other. Bernard Ready spoke against the 
article. He felt that the Representatives had already 
addressed accountability/record keeping issue by the 
Procedural Committee last year. The Committee made a 
report which contained suggestions and the 
Representatives voted it down then and urged them to do 
so again. Bradford Emerson moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, which 
left the Chair in doubt, a 2/3's vote was needed. He asked 
for the tellers to come forward and conduct a hand count. 
The following tellers were present: Dorothy Frawley, 
Lucy Simonian, Patricia Plank, and John Maleski. The 
result of the hand count: Yes 89 No 43 2/3's 88 the motion 
carried. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
main motion, motion defeated. The defeated article read 
as follows: 



293 



John Coppinger moved that the Town vote to amend its 
General Bylaws by inserting a new section Article II, to 
read as follows: 

Section 5 Town Meeting Representatives 

5.1 Within 30 days after the Annual Town Election, 
Town meeting Representatives in each precinct 
will meet, and elect a Precinct Chairman, Assistant 
Chairman, and Secretary for a term of one year. 
The Town Meeting Representatives will then 
confer on Town business and set a date for their 
next meeting. 

5.2 Each precinct will meet a minimum of four times a 
year for discussion of Town business and any 
concerns constituents may have. Based upon these 
meetings, Town Meeting Representatives may 
submit petitions for consideration by the Town 
Meeting. All meeting will be subject to provisions 
of the Open Meeting Law. 

5.3 All Town Meeting Representatives shall be seated 
by precinct and voting on each Warrant Article 
will be conducted by the Precinct Chairman polling 
each Town Representative. Each Precinct 
Chairman shall be sworn in by the Town 
Moderator as a teller. The Secretary will record 
the vote. After the polling is completed, the 
Chairman will report the total vote by the precinct 
to the Town Moderator. 

5.4 A report of each member's recorded vote will be 
turned over by the Precinct Secretary to the Town 
Clerk at the end of each day's meeting. This voting 



294 



record will be filed in the Town Clerk's office for 
inspection by any interested citizen of the Town. 

5.5 Because it is almost impossible for most Town 
Meeting Representatives to find the time to attend 
all of the Town Board Meetings, interested 
members may be appointed at Precinct Meetings to 
attend from time to time Town Board meetings and 
report back to their Precinct Meetings on any items 
of interest. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, explained that $150,000.00 of this money is from 
the savings of the Solid Waste override voted a few years 
back. This represents $12.00 per household. A discussion 
took place. Clare Jeannotte wanted to table the article 
until the conclusion of article 21, which has the 
expenditures of more free cash. The Finance Committee 
and the Board of Selectmen were both in favor of tabling 
the article. George Merrill spoke against the article. He 
felt that the money should be returned directly to the 
taxpayers. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to table, which left the Chair in doubt. The 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 78 
No 51 motion carried to table. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Bernard Lynch, Town 
Manager moved that the Town vote to appropriate from 
free cash the sum of $50,000. for the purpose of updating 
the Town of Chelmsford Master Plan. 

James Creegan, Chairman of the Planning Board 
explained the article, and the purpose of the Committee 
which was formed. The Committee is to review and to 



295 



update or replace the current Master Plan. This is a state 
law that the town is required to do every ten years. 

There were fourteen members of the Committee 
besides himself, Anthony Zagzoug, Building Inspector; 
James Harrington, Town Counsel; Thomas Firth, Jr 
Planning Board; James Pearson, Town Engineer; Wendy 
Marcks, School Committee; Paul McCarthy, Board of 
Health; Thomas Moran, Sewer Commission; Kim 
MacKenzie, Planning Board; David McLachlan, 
Conservation Commission; Robert Joyce, Board of 
Selectmen; Karen Wharton, Board of Appeals; Patricia 
Saber, Representative At Large; and Rayann Miethe, 
Recording Secretary. One of the most major flaws that 
the committee found was the present master plan did not 
take into consideration any buildable land that maybe 
subdivided even though it already had a structure on it, 
when citing the total amount of buildable land left in 
Town. The Committee felt that the goals/topics which 
need to be addressed are those of Housing, Land Use, 
Environment, Traffic, Public Utilities, Economic 
Development. The Committee felt that a professional 
municipal planner is needed to help the Committee address 
these areas. Dennis Ready asked if there will be a vision 
statement? Yes it will be included in this new master plan. 
John Wilder question why $50,000. is needed? The 
amount requested is the maximum what has been paid by 
surrounding towns. It is not necessary the amount that the 
Town will pay. The Committee has gone out on bid and 
hopes to have a planner by December 1st. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. David McLachlan 
of the Conservation Committee who was also a member of 
the Master Plan Committee asked for support of the 



296 



article. Richard Day and Dennis Ready both spoke in 
favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash the sum of $100,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing 
equipment for the operation of the municipal golf course. 

The Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that 
this is needed for the investment for the Town. If the 
equipment can be purchased for a lower price it will be. 
Presently there are sixteen proponents interested in 
managing the golf course. Jeffrey Stallard wanted to 
know what type of equipment would be purchased? 
Tractors, backhoes, mowers, golf carts. David McLachlan 
wanted to know when the final plan will be shown? The 
Manager explained that bids will be due in November, 
then it will be determined what the full cost will be. 
Jeffrey Stallard wanted to know why couldn't the present 
Town owned equipment be used. The Manager explained 
that it will mostly be specialized equipment in size, 
nothing that the Town already uses. Henrick Johnson 
wanted to know why this couldn't wait until April. The 
Town Manager explained that everything has to be in 
place and ready for the season which starts in the Spring. 
Bob Hawking wanted to know what the fixed cost would 
be to make improvements to the course? This would be 
assessed professionally by whoever will be managing the 
grounds and the decision will be made by them on the 
needs and time frame involved. More discussion took 
place. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommend the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 



297 



UNDER ARTICLE 19 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash the sum of $1,000,000.00 to defray all necessary cost, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of the 
Apple Country Club and for paying any damages which 
may be awarded as a result of any such taking. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch, explained that the 
Town already authorized the purchasing of this land by 
borrowing under Article 12 of the May 4, 1995 Special 
Town Meeting. However, by paying for this acquisition 
with free cash, it would save the Town $330,000.00 in 
interest by not having to float a bond for ten years. Also 
the Town would be restricted when borrowing. The Town 
would only be allowed to have two years of outside 
management. The Town wants to have an outside concern 
manage the property full time, which can be done because 
there will be no debt. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. George Merrill spoke against 
the article. He felt that the Town collected two million to 
much from the taxpayers, and all the money should go 
back to them. More discussion took place. Dennis Ready 
moved the question. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the article, which left the 
Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and an hand 
count was taken: Yes 120 No 14 2/3 's was 89, the motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash $379,500.00 to fund negotiated collective bargaining 
agreements. 



298 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch gave a presentation 
that listed the following amounts: 

$370,000.00 School Department 

2,500.00 Cemetery Department 

7.000.00 Highway Department 

$379,500.00 TOTAL 

He went on to further explain that this is a one time 
negotiated settlement amount by these three bargaining 
units. These unions forfeited certain items in return for 
this one time pay off. This will not effect the tax base 
because it is coming from free cash. Clare Jeannotte asked 
what would happen if this article was defeated? The 
Town Manager explained that re-negotiations would have 
to start again. Glenn Thoren asked what would have 
happened if there was no free cash available? The 
Manager explained that a different stricture in negotiating 
the contract would have taken place. Robert Hall wanted 
to know how much savings in the School Budget this 
would present. Wendy Marcks, Chairman of the School 
Committee explained that $75,000 would be saved the first 
year of the contract and $172,000.00 would be saved the 
second year of the contract, for a total savings of 
$250,000.00. A Discussion took place. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article now that the figures 
were available. The Board of Selectmen recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash the sum of $431,097.00 to be added to the 
Stabilization Fund. 



299 



The Town Manager explained that he wants to 
rebuild the stabilization fund up to 5% of the budget. It 
makes the Town look like a well plan community. Which 
looks good for bond rating. With a good rating the Town 
can borrow for 1% less when it comes time to borrow for 
sewage and other projects. During the difficult times of 
1991-1992 no reserve money was available. John Wilder 
questioned why this money wasn't set aside last April. 
This is money that was made available after the budget 
was passed. Estimates are made and projected figures are 
passed. There is no way to determine the actual amount of 
monies collected from real estate and excise taxes until it 
has been done. The Finance Committee supported the 
article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried. The Moderator explained that the Body was to 
return to article 16 which had been tabled. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free 
cash the sum of $200,000.00 for the reduction of the tax 
rate. 

The Town Manager said that he had already 
explained the article previously and asked for support. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to amend the Fiscal 
Year 1996 operating budget under Article 2 of the April 
24, 1995 Annual Town Meeting. 



300 





Change 


Revised 


1 . Gen'l Govern. Salary 


+$ 4,924 


$ 1,032,557 


2. Gen'l Govern. Expense 


+ 7,000 


392,298 


6. Public Education 


+516,084 


28,219,409 


7. Nashoba Assessment 


- 14,455 


496,617 


8. Public Safety Salary 


+ 48,933 


5,575,589 


12. Public Works Salary 


+ 1,138 


1,136,636 


13. Public Works Expense 


- 17,000 


2,570,595 


19. Cemetery Salary 


+ 934 


170,070 


23. Comm. Service Salary 


+ 1,481 


353,346 


25. Library Salary 


+ 25,679 


667,118 



DEBT and INTEREST 

29. Principal - 79,316 4,163,510 

30. Interest - 25,396 1,864,409 



The Town Manager explained the changes shown. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Selectman Robert P.Joyce, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire an easement for public or municipal 
parking purposes on a portion of the property at 40 Vinal 
Square shown on Assessors Map 7 as Lot 10, on such 
terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may 
determine, or in the alternative, to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter in a lease for said parcel for a period in 
excess of three (3) years. 



301 



The Town Manager explained a lot of road work is 
being done presently within the square to improve the 
area. This article was needed in order to improve the 
parking conditions in Vinal Square. Jeffrey Stallard 
questioned if there was going to be a fence along the tree 
area located in the back part of the lot? Even though it 
will be lighted, the possibility of a fence should be looked 
into. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. 
The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Henrick Johnson moved to 
waive the reading of this article. Motion carried, 
unanimously by a show of hands. 

Chairman of the School Committee, Wendy 
Marcks, explained that this money would go directly to 
programs not under the supervision of the School 
Committee. Anthony Volpe, member of the School 
Committee said that there are fifty communities in 
Massachusetts who already have this program in motion. 
This would be a chance for the public to support the 
school system if they so choose, over and above what they 
pay in real estate taxes. Michael Sockol questioned who 
would have the appointing powers to appoint the 
committee. Anthony Volpe said that it would be the Town 
Manager. Kit Harbison questioned the amount of money 
involved needed to start. It would be the cost of the lock 
box, one time printing fee to adjust the tax bill, and 
administration cost. Barbara Ward questioned what has 
happened to pass funding programs? Judith Hass of the 
Chelmsford Education Foundation said that their 
foundation was unsuccessful and dissolved. The Finance 



302 



Committee did not support the article. They felt that other 
departments would want the same privileged, and it would 
not be a good precedent to set. The Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. A discussion took place. Questions 
were asked concerning the flexibility of the banks 
allowing for these extra funds when people have escrow 
accounts for their taxes. It was felt that most people 
wouldn't want to give any more than what they already do. 
Why go into the expense of setting up an account and 
administering it, only to have it be closed up. Susan Gates 
moved to amend the article by adding to section E. 
number four (4) The Chelmsford Education Fund shall 
disburse all funds and dissolve at the end of FY 1998 
unless renewed by a vote of Town Meeting. She 
explained that this would give the program a fair chance. 
If it didn't prove worth while then it could be dissolved. 
The Finance Committee did not support the motion to 
amend. The Board of Selectmen supported the motion. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend. Motion defeated. More discussion took place. 
John Wilder spoke in favor of the article. The Finance 
Committee members were polled for their vote of the 
article. All the members said they were against the article. 
More discussion took place. James Young moved the 
question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion defeated. 
Jeffrey Stallard moved to have a roll call conducted. The 
Moderator asked the tellers to come forward and take a 
hand count: 17 were in favor of a roll call vote. The 
By-law states that 40 representatives must be in favor. 
Roll call motion defeated. The defeated article read as 
follows: 



303 



Chairman of the School Committee, Wendy 
Marcks, moved that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 60, Section 3C, 
authorizing the establishment of the Chelmsford Education 
Fund, and to amend the General by-laws by adding a new 
section 13 to Article VII, to read as follows: 

Section 13, Chelmsford Education Fund 

A. PURPOSE 

The Town of Chelmsford Education Fund is 
established in accordance with the provisions of 
M.G.L. Chap. 60, Section 3C as amended by the 
Acts of 1993 to provide supplemental educational 
funding for local educational needs. 

B. DEFINITIONS 

1. Local educational needs shall be defined as the 
needs of the schools and students which are under 
the jurisdiction of the Local Education Agency 
(LEA) which is the Chelmsford Public Schools. 

2. Supplemental educational funding shall be defined 
as that which adds to or enhances the educational 
opportunities provided by the Local Educational 
Agency and funded by the Town of Chelmsford. 
Supplemental funding cannot a.) take the place of 
funds requested in the Chelmsford School 
Committee's annual budget request which support 
the essential curriculum and programs of the 
Chelmsford Public Schools; b.) create new ongoing 
programs which cannot be supported in the future 
by the Chelmsford Public Schools or c.) provide 



304 



for the continuation of programs which the 
Chelmsford Public Schools no longer support. 

THE CHELMSFORD EDUCATION FUND 
COMMITTEE 

1 . There shall be established a Chelmsford Education 
Fund Committee to administer the Chelmsford 
Educational Fund and to authorize the expenditure 
of its funds. 

2. Members of the Chelmsford Educational Fund 
Committee shall be the Superintendent of Schools 
or his designee and four residents of the Town, one 
of whom shall be a member of the Chelmsford 
School Committee (recommended by the 
Chairman), one of whom shall be the parent of a 
child enrolled in the Chelmsford Public Schools, 
one of whom shall be a member of the business 
community, and one at large member. 

3. Appointment to three year terms will be made in 
accordance with the statute. Upon initial formation 
of the Committee, terms of members will be 
arranged so that the terms of as nearly an equal 
number of members as is possible shall expire each 
year. 

D. MEETINGS 

1. The Chelmsford Education Fund Committee shall 

meet quarterly and at other times are deemed 
necessary and appropriate for the conduct of 
Committee business. 



305 



2. A quorum for purposes of transacting business 
shall consist of four members. Decisions shall be 
based upon the vote of a majority of the members 
present. 

3. The Town Treasurer shall provide the Committee 
with quarterly financial reports on the status of the 
Chelmsford Education Fund. 

E. PROCEDURES 

1 . Written proposals requesting supplemental funding 
from the Chelmsford Education Fund shall be 
submitted to the Chelmsford Education Fund 
Committee at least two weeks before a meeting and 
shall be presented according to the format specified 
by the Committee. 

2. Application for such funds may be made by the 
Chelmsford School Committee through the 
superintendent of Schools, by a School Committee 
(as established under M.G.L. Chap.71, Section 
59C) and by members of the professional staff 
employed by the Chelmsford Public Schools. 

3. All requests for supplemental funding must support 
the mission and beliefs of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools and be in accordance with Chelmsford 
School Committee policy. 

Dennis Ready moved to adjourned the Town 
Meeting seeing that there was no further business at hand. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



306 



The Meeting adjourned at 1 1 :00 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



307 




OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

SO BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD. MA 01S24-3103 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

-GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

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DATE; 



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AMOUNT OP TIME AVAILABLE: 



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PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK: 



BUSMESS EXPERIENCE: 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL T W A — We 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TOW* EXPIRED 



REMARKS: 



FORM AVAILABLE IN TOW MANAGER'S OFFICE 



309 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to Town Committees 309 

Appointed Town Officials 7 

Balance Sheet 13 

Board of Appeals 137 

Board of Health 27 

Board of Registrars 26 

Board of Selectmen 15 

Celebrations Committee 139 

Cemetery Commission 46 

Central Mass. Mosquito Control District 33 

Commission on Disabilities 140 

Community Service Council 142 

Conservation Commission 144 

Council on Aging 146 

Cultural Council 148 

Department of Public Works 

- Engineering 36 

- Highway Division 39 

- Parks Division 41 

- Public Buildings Division 42 

- Sewer Division 44 

Dog Officer 73 

Elected Officials 5 

Emergency Management 151 

Finance Committee 152 

Finance Department 

- Accounting 49 

- Assessors 50 

- Data Processing 51 

- Treasurer 52 

Fire Department 54 

General Information 1 

Historic District Commission 1 54 

Historical Commission 156 

Holiday Decorating Committee 158 

Housing Authority 1 60 



INDEX 

Page 

Inspections Department 74 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 128 

Personnel Board 1 62 

Planning Board 1 63 

Police Department 58 

Police Auxiliary 71 

Public Libraries 75 

Recreation Commission 1 66 

Sewer Commission 1 69 

School Committee 81 

- Principal - High School 85 

- Principal - McCarthy Middle School 88 

- Student/Community Services 90 

- Guidance Department 91 

- Data Processing 92 

- English Department - 6-8 94 

- English Department -9-12 96 

- Fine Arts Department 97 

- Foreign Language Department - 7-12 99 

- Mathematics Department - K-8 101 

- Mathematics Department -9-12 1 03 

- Reading Department- K- 12 105 

- Science Department - 5-8 108 

- Science Department - 9- 1 2q 110 

- Social Studies Department - 5-8 113 

- Social Studies Department - 9-12 114 

- Health & Physical Education 116 

- Director of Education Technology 118 

- Athletics 121 

- Practical Arts - 9-12 122 

- Special Education 1 24 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 1 76 

Town Clerk 25 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Meetings and Elections 

-Warrant for Annual Town Election- April 4, 1 995 ... 181 

-Results of Annual Town Election- April 4, 1 995 1 84 

-Annual Town Meeting Minutes- April 24, 1995 1 86 

-Warrant for Special Town Meeting-May 4, 1995 209 

-Special Town Meeting Minutes-May 4, 1995 210 

-Adjourned Annual Town Meeting-May 8, 1995 236 

-Warrant for Fall Annual Town Meet.-Oct. 16, 1995 . 261 

-Annual Fall Town Meet. Minutes-October 16, 1995 . 262 

-Warrant for Special Town Election-October 17, 1995 263 

-Results of Special Town Election-October 1 7, 1 995 . 265 

-Adjourned Annual Fall Twn Meet. Min.-Oct. 19, 1995 266 

-Adjourned Annual Town Meeting-October 23, 1995 289 

Town Directory 2 

Town Manager 19 

Town Meeting Representative Members 9 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 1 78 

Veterans' Services 1 77 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1480 00778 9404 



For Reference 



Not to be taken 



from this library 



. -- 



"Disabled individuals requiring auxiliary aides to fully 
benefit from the Town of Chelmsford's programs should 
contact the Personnel Coordinator at 250-5201. It is 
necessary to give the request at least one week in 
advance. "